News story: The race is on! Showcase your success stories at the National Apprenticeship Awards 2019

first_imgApprenticeships and Skills Minister, Anne Milton concluded: Intermediate Level (level 2) Advanced Level (level 3) Higher or Degree Level (level 4 or higher) Last year’s Higher or Degree Level winner was Jordan Coulton, a Paralegal undertaking the Level 6 Chartered Legal Executive Apprenticeship with Weightman’s LLP. Jordan was not only Weightmans’ first apprentice but also the first higher Legal apprentice in the country.Commenting on the benefits of entering the awards in 2019, Jordan said: Calling all employers who fire up their business with apprenticeships, inspirational apprentices who blaze their own trail, rising stars with the drive to succeed and individuals who champion apprenticeships with passion: the National Apprenticeship Awards 2019 are now open for applications – until Friday 24 May.The National Apprenticeship Awards 2019 are a brilliant opportunity to highlight business and individual success in apprenticeships. Apprentice employers, apprentices and apprenticeship champions from all industries are invited to enter. The awards are open to everyone, across all workplaces, from Agriculture, the Arts to Science and Mathematics.This year, the Apprenticeship Champion category has been transformed, with the application process starting with a nomination, aimed at those who know someone who champions apprenticeships with passion. After writing a short reference, the nominee will complete the application.The award categories open to apprentices and individuals include:Apprentice of the Year categories: The National Apprenticeships Awards is a fantastic opportunity to recognise and celebrate apprentices, their employers and the many apprenticeship programmes and their champions across the country. Apprenticeships change lives of people of all ages and apprentices help businesses grow and thrive. I am thrilled that we are now seeing more and more employers large and small offering people of all ages and backgrounds the chance to start their apprenticeship journey and get on the path to a rewarding job and career. If you know an amazing employer, apprentice or someone who is a passionate supporter of apprenticeships then please enter them and help celebrate this year’s successes. I wish everyone the best of luck and look forward to the award ceremony later this year! Apprenticeship Champion of the YearRecognises individuals who go ‘above and beyond’ to champion apprenticeships. And, new for 2019 – the initial nomination is now made by a colleague or contact who recognises an individual’s ‘champion’ credentials.The Rising Star AwardNominated by their employer, this award recognises apprentices that have made impressive progress in their career to date, and have the potential to go even further. The selection of the national winner will include a public vote.The award categories open to employers include:Employer of the Year categories: SME Employer of the Year (for organisations with 1 to 249 employees) Large Employer of the Year (for organisations with 250 to 4,999 employees) Macro Employer of the Year (for organisations with 5,000+ employees) A series of free to attend webinars to explain the awards process in more detail, including hints and tips on completing your application. There are two versions of webinars available, one for individuals and one for employers and each will last approximately 30 minutes. To find out more about the awards and to register to attend a webinar, visit the App Awards website.National Apprenticeship Awards 2018You can watch the National Apprenticeship Awards 2018 national ceremony highlights, follow @Apprenticeships on Twitter and the National Apprenticeship Service page on LinkedIn to keep up to date with all the latest awards information. We were absolutely delighted to win SME Employer of the year award; getting recognition at the highest level for our commitment to apprenticeships. We see apprenticeships as a positive way of tackling the technical skills gap, and a real addition to the established graduate route into the profession, with the added benefit of gaining valuable work experience along the way. By entering the awards, employers and apprentices will be joining the best in the industry, showcasing your talents and learning from others. Just by taking part it sets you apart from the rest. The Recruitment Excellence AwardThe winner will be selected from Employer of the Year award entries, and will be awarded to an organisation that has recruited a diverse and high quality apprenticeship workforce.Troup, Bywaters + Anders (T, B + A) won the SME Employer of the Year in 2018 and want to encourage employers, of all sizes, to enter the National Apprenticeship Awards.Terry Canty, Partner at TB+A said: I would urge other apprentice’s who have made a valid contribution to their company and the wider apprenticeship movement to make an application for this year’s awards. I never realised how much of an impact actually winning would have – I have widened connections both within and outside Weightmans LLP as well as being recognised by my peers and colleagues alike. It will take 1 hour of your time and could change your life, do it!last_img read more

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Centrosome amplification may contribute to initiation of cancers research suggests

first_imgMay 8 2018Cells begin to accumulate centrosomes-;organelles that play a vital role during cell division-;before they transform into cancer cells, according to a new study of patients with Barrett’s esophagus condition, which is associated with esophageal cancer. The research, which will be published May 8 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that similar cases of centrosome amplification may contribute to the initiation and progression of a variety of human cancers.Centrosomes play crucial roles in a wide range of cellular processes by organizing the cell’s microtubule cytoskeleton. Cells usually contain just a single centrosome that they carefully duplicate once per cell cycle so that, when the cell divides, they can organize microtubules into a bipolar spindle that allows each daughter cell to inherit an equal number of chromosomes and a single centrosome of its own. Cells with too many centrosomes usually fail to divide properly and die.Cancer cells often contain excessive numbers of centrosomes, however, and usually survive cell division despite their propensity to form abnormal spindles and missegregate chromosomes. Indeed, the genomic instability created by excess centrosomes may help cancer cells to become more malignant.”Centrosome amplification is found in human tumors but not in normal cells, so it is an appealing feature to explore for diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy,” explains Carla Lopes, from the Instituto Português de Oncologia and Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência in Portugal. “Despite being a cancer hallmark, however, the timing, mechanisms, and impact of centrosome deregulation in human cancer are poorly understood.”Lopes and colleagues, including co-first author Marta Mesquita and co-senior authors Mónica Bettencourt-Dias and Paula Chaves, investigated the role of centrosome amplification in tumorigenesis by examining samples from patients with the premalignant condition Barrett’s esophagus, in which chronic acid reflux causes the epithelial cells lining the esophagus to be replaced by cells usually found only in the stomach and intestine. In a small percentage of patients, these “metaplastic” cells become dysplastic and proliferate abnormally, eventually giving rise to esophageal adenocarcinoma.Related StoriesTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerEmbrace your natural skin tone to prevent skin cancer, say expertsPatients with Barrett’s esophagus therefore undergo regular biopsy screenings, and any dysplastic tissue is removed. This allowed Lopes, Mesquita, and colleagues to investigate how centrosome numbers change at different stages of the disease.”We established a method to identify centrosomes at the single-cell level in clinical samples and found that centrosome number abnormalities arise early in Barrett’s esophagus progression,” Mesquita says.The researchers never saw excess centrosomes in normal esophageal tissue. Nor did they see centrosome amplification in Barrett’s esophagus patients that hadn’t progressed to later stages of the disease. But extra centrosomes could occasionally be seen in the premalignant, metaplastic cells of patients that developed dysplasia or adenocarcinoma. The incidence of centrosome amplification increased dramatically during dysplasia, and cells with excess centrosomes persisted throughout adenocarcinoma and metastasis.The increase in centrosome amplification at the onset of dysplasia coincided with the loss or mutation of the tumor suppressor p53. The most mutated gene in human cancers, p53 is thought to kill cells with too many centrosomes. Lopes, Mesquita, and colleagues found that p53 was activated in metaplastic cells with extra centrosomes and that removing p53 from these cells increased the levels of centrosome amplification.This suggests that centrosome amplification arises in some cells during metaplasia and that p53 prevents these cells from propagating until it is lost during the transition to dysplasia. Cells with extra centrosomes can then survive and proliferate, giving rise to cells with abnormal numbers of chromosomes that can become malignant cancer cells.”Given the widespread occurrence of p53 mutations and centrosome amplification in human tumors, our findings on the timing and ordering of these events in Barrett’s esophagus tumorigenesis are likely applicable to other cancers as well,” Lopes says.​ Source:http://www.rupress.org/last_img read more

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