Academic Professional AC

first_imgEEO Statement About the University of Georgia The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, its many units, and theUniversity of Georgia are committed to increasing the diversity ofits faculty and students and sustaining a work and learningenvironment that is inclusive. The University of Georgia ( UGA ), a land-grant and sea-grantuniversity with statewide commitments and responsibilities is thestate’s oldest, most comprehensive, and most diversifiedinstitution of higher education ( http://www.uga.edu/ ). UGA is currentlyranked among the top 20 public universities in U.S. News &World Report. The University’s main campus is located in Athens,approximately 65 miles northeast of Atlanta, with extended campusesin Atlanta, Griffin, Gwinnett, and Tifton. UGA was founded in 1785by the Georgia General Assembly as the first state-charteredUniversity in the country. UGA employs approximately 1,800full-time instructional faculty and more than 7,600 full-timestaff. The University’s enrollment exceeds 36,000 studentsincluding over 27,500 undergraduates and over 8,500 graduate andprofessional students. Academic programs reside in 17 schools andcolleges, as well as a medical partnership with Augusta Universityhoused on the UGA Health Sciences Campus in Athens. Advertised Salary Anticipated Start Date08/01/2021 Tenure StatusNon-Tenure Track Benefits EligibilityBenefits Eligible College/Unit/Department websitewww.plantbio.uga.edu/ Job Posting Date01/07/2021 Job Closing Date Employment TypeEmployee The University of Georgia Department of Plant Biology(https://plantbio.uga.edu/) invites applications for a PlantBiology Undergraduate Teaching Specialist. The successful applicantwill be expected to develop a clear and creative vision for themanagement of an introductory plant biology laboratoryinstructional program. The appointment will be at the rank ofAcademic Professional Associate or Academic Professional, which arefull-time, non-tenure track faculty positions. Special Instructions to Applicants Classification TitleAcademic Professional AC Open until filledYes Posting Details DepartmentFranklin College Plant Biology Department Location of VacancyAthens Area Preferred Knowledge, Skills, Abilities and/or Competencies Terminal degree in a disciplinary area appropriate for the position(as defined in the job posting) Candidates should submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, teachingportfolio including a concise statement of accomplishments inteaching and evidence of excellence in teaching, diversitystatement, and a brief description of any relevant administrativeexperience. Application materials must be submitted online(https://www.ugajobsearch.com/postings/180472). Candidates shouldalso arrange for the submission of a minimum of 3 letters ofrecommendation to: [email protected] Correspondenceshould be addressed to the search committee chair, Prof. PeggyBrickman ([email protected]). Review of applications will beginFebruary 6, 2021, but applications will be accepted until theposition is filled. Additional Requirements Duties/ResponsibilitiesPosting Specific QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*).Applicant DocumentsRequired DocumentsResume/CVCover LetterTeaching Portfolio/PhilosophyOptional DocumentsOther Documents #1Other Documents #2 Working TitleAcademic Professional AC Position Details Posting NumberF0800Pcenter_img Minimum Qualifications Underutilization Be advised a credit check will be required for all positions withfinancial responsibilities. For additional information about thecredit check criteria, visit the UGA Credit Background Check website. Is driving a responsibility of this position?No Does this position have Security Access (e.g., public safety,IT security, personnel records, patient records, or access tochemicals and medications)Yes Physical Demands Is this a Position of Trust?Yes The University of Georgia is an Equal Opportunity/AffirmativeAction employer. All qualified applicants will receiveconsideration for employment without regard to race, color,religion, sex, national origin, ethnicity, age, geneticinformation, disability, gender identity, sexual orientation orprotected veteran status. Persons needing accommodations orassistance with the accessibility of materials related to thissearch are encouraged to contact Central HR ([email protected]). Credit and P-Card policy About the College/Unit/Department Posting TypeExternal One year of previous experience in biology education or anequivalent postdoctoral position is highly desirable, as isadministrative experience in an instructional setting. Effective End Date (for Limited-Term postings) Applicants are sought who demonstrate a commitment to excellence ininstruction. Retirement Plan For requirements for each rank, see the UGA Guidelines forAppointment and Promotion of Academic Professionals(https://t.uga.edu/6BD).A Ph.D. (or equivalent) in biology, science education, or a relatedfield is required at the time of appointment. Position Summary Does this position require a P-Card?No Is having a P-Card an essential function of this position?No Faculty RankOpen Rank Does this position have direct interaction or care of childrenunder the age of 18 or direct patient care?No Does this position have operation, access, or control offinancial resources?Yes Relevant/Preferred Education, Experience, Licensure, and/orCertification Contract TypeAcademic (9 mo.) FLSAlast_img read more

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Centrosome amplification may contribute to initiation of cancers research suggests

first_imgMay 8 2018Cells begin to accumulate centrosomes-;organelles that play a vital role during cell division-;before they transform into cancer cells, according to a new study of patients with Barrett’s esophagus condition, which is associated with esophageal cancer. The research, which will be published May 8 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that similar cases of centrosome amplification may contribute to the initiation and progression of a variety of human cancers.Centrosomes play crucial roles in a wide range of cellular processes by organizing the cell’s microtubule cytoskeleton. Cells usually contain just a single centrosome that they carefully duplicate once per cell cycle so that, when the cell divides, they can organize microtubules into a bipolar spindle that allows each daughter cell to inherit an equal number of chromosomes and a single centrosome of its own. Cells with too many centrosomes usually fail to divide properly and die.Cancer cells often contain excessive numbers of centrosomes, however, and usually survive cell division despite their propensity to form abnormal spindles and missegregate chromosomes. Indeed, the genomic instability created by excess centrosomes may help cancer cells to become more malignant.”Centrosome amplification is found in human tumors but not in normal cells, so it is an appealing feature to explore for diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy,” explains Carla Lopes, from the Instituto Português de Oncologia and Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência in Portugal. “Despite being a cancer hallmark, however, the timing, mechanisms, and impact of centrosome deregulation in human cancer are poorly understood.”Lopes and colleagues, including co-first author Marta Mesquita and co-senior authors Mónica Bettencourt-Dias and Paula Chaves, investigated the role of centrosome amplification in tumorigenesis by examining samples from patients with the premalignant condition Barrett’s esophagus, in which chronic acid reflux causes the epithelial cells lining the esophagus to be replaced by cells usually found only in the stomach and intestine. In a small percentage of patients, these “metaplastic” cells become dysplastic and proliferate abnormally, eventually giving rise to esophageal adenocarcinoma.Related StoriesTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerEmbrace your natural skin tone to prevent skin cancer, say expertsPatients with Barrett’s esophagus therefore undergo regular biopsy screenings, and any dysplastic tissue is removed. This allowed Lopes, Mesquita, and colleagues to investigate how centrosome numbers change at different stages of the disease.”We established a method to identify centrosomes at the single-cell level in clinical samples and found that centrosome number abnormalities arise early in Barrett’s esophagus progression,” Mesquita says.The researchers never saw excess centrosomes in normal esophageal tissue. Nor did they see centrosome amplification in Barrett’s esophagus patients that hadn’t progressed to later stages of the disease. But extra centrosomes could occasionally be seen in the premalignant, metaplastic cells of patients that developed dysplasia or adenocarcinoma. The incidence of centrosome amplification increased dramatically during dysplasia, and cells with excess centrosomes persisted throughout adenocarcinoma and metastasis.The increase in centrosome amplification at the onset of dysplasia coincided with the loss or mutation of the tumor suppressor p53. The most mutated gene in human cancers, p53 is thought to kill cells with too many centrosomes. Lopes, Mesquita, and colleagues found that p53 was activated in metaplastic cells with extra centrosomes and that removing p53 from these cells increased the levels of centrosome amplification.This suggests that centrosome amplification arises in some cells during metaplasia and that p53 prevents these cells from propagating until it is lost during the transition to dysplasia. Cells with extra centrosomes can then survive and proliferate, giving rise to cells with abnormal numbers of chromosomes that can become malignant cancer cells.”Given the widespread occurrence of p53 mutations and centrosome amplification in human tumors, our findings on the timing and ordering of these events in Barrett’s esophagus tumorigenesis are likely applicable to other cancers as well,” Lopes says.​ Source:http://www.rupress.org/last_img read more

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