One man dead following N2 crash near Carrickmacross

first_img Community Enhancement Programme open for applications Pinterest By News Highland – November 29, 2017 Previous articleBrexit agreement could be closer, but May denies a deal has been doneNext articleDaisy Ridley worked the bar at the Irish wrap party for ‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi’ News Highland One man dead following N2 crash near Carrickmacross Homepage BannerNews RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th A man in his 70s has died in a crash on the N2 in County Monaghan.He was the driver of a car that was in collision with a lorry on the outskirts of Carrickmacross just before 5pm.The driver was pronounced dead at the scene, while the driver of the lorry was taken to hospital.His injuries are not thought to be life threatening.The road is currently closed to traffic in both directions and diversions are in place. Google+ Google+ Facebookcenter_img Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows WhatsApp Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Pinterest WhatsApp Facebook Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Twitter Twitterlast_img read more

Read more

Coronavirus hits Puerto Rico, still in turmoil from Hurricane Maria

first_imgiStock(PUERTO RICO) — As the novel coronavirus continues to have an impact on the lives of millions of Americans across the nation, residents of Puerto Rico are already feeling the toll of a crisis within a crisis.In the last three years, the U.S. territory has gone through a deadly hurricane, an unprecedented financial crisis, hundreds of earthquakes and government scandals.Now, with a virus that has already taken the lives of at least 42 people and left over 780 individuals infected, residents of the island are fighting the COVID-19 pandemic with a shaky infrastructure.“I’m worried of the stability of the government,” Enid Zurita said.Zurita and her family are among the 20,000 households in Puerto Rico that don’t have a stable roof, nearly three years after Hurricane María.Ever since Maria hit on the morning of Sept. 20, 2017, the 43-year-old Zurita, her husband and her two daughters have been living with Zurita’s mother.Being away from the place she calls home was something she was looking forward to changing soon. After waiting and waiting for the government to respond, the family decided to seek help in places not related to the federal or local governments.Techos Pa’ Mi Gente, a not-for-profit organization, took Zurita’s case and offered to repair the family’s home in Caguas, 20 miles south of San Juan.Everything was starting to fall into place, but the week Techos Pa’ Mi Gente was scheduled to start repairs, the governor of Puerto Rico, Wanda Vázquez, imposed a stay-at-home order to fight the COVID-19 outbreak on the island. The rebuilding has been delayed until the pandemic ends.“Until when will we have to wait?” Zurita said, in a tone that indicated her frustration.Community leader Omayra Ríos says that lately in Puerto Rico when it rains it pours. She has been working for 20 years with the low-income community of Shanghai in San Juan. One of her main worries is the stability and well-being of its residents in this pandemic. “The future is very uncertain,” Ríos said. Families in this community are among the 43% of Puerto Ricans who live under the poverty level.“How are they going to pay bills?” Ríos asked. Just like in the states, jobless claims in the U.S. territory have spiked. According to Puerto Rico’s General Union of Workers, at least 300,000 people have filed for unemployment benefits during the coronavirus crisis.Although the territory will receive funds from the $2.2 trillion stimulus package approved by the U.S. Congress, there is worry among economists about when Puerto Rico will have access to the aid.Jose Caraballo-Cueto, economist and professor at the University of Puerto Rico, says, “It’s going to take some time” before the island starts receiving funds approved under the CARES Act. Some estimates made by economists in Puerto Rico say the economic losses related to the pandemic could reach up to $10 billion.Caraballo-Cueto said that because the island’s financial heath was already compromised, the economic hit will be significant.“The economy is going to drop,” he said.Puerto Rico has been fighting a recession for over a decade with more than $120 billion in debt, battling multiple crisis at the same time.“It’s been one thing after another,” Zurita said. “In addition, the ground hasn’t stop shaking,” she added.On Jan. 7, the island registered a 6.4-magnitude earthquake that led to hundreds of aftershocks that are still being felt by residents on the island.To fight the huge threat this new health crisis represents for the island’s future, the local government has imposed extreme measures. Non-essential businesses in Puerto Rico have been closed since March 16 and people are only allowed to go out to get medical attention or buy supplies. Residents have been under a strict curfew for more than three weeks, following an executive order signed by Gov. Wanda Vázquez.On April 1, new measures were added to the executive order to fight what the local medical task force considered the toughest week. Some of these measures included controlling the amount of people in the streets by designating specific dates in which individuals were able to use their vehicles to go out and get supplies.This week Joel A. Pizá Batiz, executive director of Puerto Rico’s Port Authority, made a request to the Federal Aviation Administration to allow the government to prohibit the entrance of commercial flights from current and potential “hot spots” in the U.S.The letter says the vulnerability of the island’s Health Department is the reason behind this special request.The FAA told ABC News the agency is reviewing the request made by the government.On Saturday, Vázquez announced that she will extend the stay-at-home order until May 3. She also said that the positive response of Puerto Ricans to the strict measures helped in the island’s spread curve. She adjusted the executive order by canceling the vehicle restrictions and moving the curfew from 7 p.m. to 5 a.m. to 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. The curfew will go into effect on Monday.As the threat of the coronavirus continues to grow, Puerto Rico’s government is once again facing scrutiny. A questionable purchase order to buy COVID-19 test kits, lacking approval from the Food and Drug Administration, was approved by Gov. Vázquez’s administration. In a press conference offered on Wednesday night, Vázquez said the order had been canceled upon a noncompliance to the deal.“In this administration no one is allowed to act incorrectly,” Vázquez said, responding to the critics related to the agreement. She defended the deal saying “the process was completed just like other documents” in the government.Vázquez added that if there is proof that someone did commit wrongdoing, an investigation should be ordered.Although the island’s stability seems to be at threat once again, Puerto Ricans are positive they will get through this new crisis.“We are fighters,” Zurita said. “COVID-19 is not stopping us.” Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read more

Mount Sinai South Nassau’s Chief Cardiologist Talks Innovations in Heart Medicine

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Dr. Lawrence Kanner, the chief of cardiology at Mount Sinai South Nassau in Oceanside, is leading the hospital’s cardiac unit into a new era as it embarks on a journey to perform open-heart surgery for the first time.In a partnership with Mount Sinai Heart, which was ranked No. 6 nationally for cardiology and heart surgery by U.S. News & World Report, work is slated to begin in the spring on a new four-story addition that will include nine new operating suites specifically designed for open-heart surgery, pending health department approval.This conversation has been edited for length and clarity.What inspired you to focus your medical practice on the heart? The thing about cardiology is — especially procedural cardiology — is that not only can you get the immediate gratification of fixing something but you also frequently have long-term relationships. I don’t know why anyone would do anything else. I get the best of both worlds. I get to fix things and make people feel better right away. Can you tell me about the advancements in preventing, detecting, and treating heart disease that you’ve seen? In the last 15 to 20 years, statins, the anticholesterol drugs, have had a huge effect on how we manage coronary disease. They have been demonstrated to show plaque regression so you can actually have blockages and then go on high doses of statin therapy, like Lipitor or Crestor, so that you can actually reverse coronary disease with medicines. In terms of intervention, much of the research has gone toward stents. They came out with drugs that were coated with a drug that inhibited the progression of scar tissue. The number of open-heart surgeries for bypass that are being done really tanked after that because many patients can be managed in the cath lab. In my area, defibrillators have made a huge difference. Twenty-five years ago patients died when they were outside of a heart attack. Many of those patients went on to have a sudden death afterwards. Now we have very well-established guidelines on how to approach a patient who has a weak heart muscle after a heart attack, and many of these patients get seen years after their defibrillator is put in.What issues have you faced in ushering some of these advancements into practice? Sometimes there’s intolerance toward medications or patients’ ability to afford medications sometimes comes into play. In terms of device implantation for defibrillators, there are patients who are not good candidates based on the fact they have not been optimized on their medication. And there are still many people in the community who aren’t seeing doctors regularly.What can the public do to mitigate their risk? The only thing that a person can’t do is change their genes. If you have early disease in your family, that’s one thing that can’t be changed. Smoking is No. 1. There’s nothing good that smoking does. Good control of diabetes is another one. Very aggressive control of sugar. Weight reduction, when appropriate. And making sure when you hit those adult years, 40 years-plus, that you’re seeing your primary care physician regularly. How has the coronavirus pandemic impacted your work? We have a general feeling for how many heart attacks we see on a monthly basis and it kind of dropped off somewhat during Covid. And it’s not because Covid was protecting against getting a heart attack. Those people did not seek care. Is there anything on the horizon that has you excited about how we treat patients next? The main thrust in our area now has been the management of atrial fibrillation. AFib is the most common heart rhythm disorder in the country and has certain morbidities associated with it. And one of the main growth areas has been ablation of aFib where we electrically isolate the areas of the heart that are causing atrial fibrillation. Anything else you want to add? We’re going to be developing an open-heart program here at Mount Sinai South Nassau. In 2006 we were the first hospitals to do an angioplasty in a hospital that didn’t have cardiac surgery on-site. We were the first hospital in New York State to do that. The program then grew and we developed a very successful cardiology program. We don’t do open-heart surgery here yet. That is one of the technologies we’re going to be growing over the next several years under Mount Sinai Heart.Sign up for Long Island Press’ email newsletters here. Sign up for home delivery of Long Island Press here. Sign up for discounts by becoming a Long Island Press community partner here.last_img read more

Read more