Explore the outdoors in Blair County, Pennsylvania

first_img One of the state’s most unique parks is located in Hollidaysburg, Blair County. Canoe Creek State Park was chosen by the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) and its Bureau of Parks as one of “Twenty Must-See Pennsylvania State Parks”. When you make the turn onto Canoe Creek Road leading right into the park you’ll quickly feel like you’re on an island of nature. The 961-acre state park is tucked right up into the Pennsylvania Mountains. There are no entrancefees or day use fees to visit a state park in Pennsylvania. You and your familyare invited to hike the trails, enjoy the beach or picnic at Canoe Creekwithout paying for the time you spend there. Outdoor adventures can offer more than abreath of fresh air. Spending time outdoors is good for you, educational andfun. You can find a variety of recreational activities all in one spot when youvisit a Pennsylvania State Park.center_img In addition to hiking trails, Canoe CreekState Park features a 155-acre lake where you can fish year round as well as a sandbeach that is open for swimming during the summer months. The park is openevery day of the year, sunrise to sunset. There are modern cabins located on ahill overlooking the lake. Or you can stay in one of a number of hotels locatedless than 5 miles from the park. To Explore these Big Adventures and more in Blair County, Pennsylvania visit explorealtoona.com or call 1-800-842-5866 to request a Visitors Guide filled with information about the destination. Canoe Creek State Park offers 12 miles of trails. They can take you through forests, wetlands and along the lakeshore. Visitors to the park will tell you their favorite trail is the Limestone Loop. This 1.2 mile trail is rated as easy and follows the old railroad grade to the Blair Limestone Company Kilns. “As you’re exploring along this trail, it’s really awesome when you enter the area where the kilns stand. They have a profound presence in the park”, says Jennifer Fleck, Marketing Manager at Explore Altoona. Geological formations in the park are rich in limestone. As a result the Petersburg spur of the Pennsylvania Railroad traveled through what is now Canoe Creek State Park to connect the lime kilns with the mainline railroad during the early 1900s. The limestone was extracted and used for many purposes, including supplying a raw material for the once thriving iron and steel industry of Pennsylvania. Once mined, the limestone was taken to a kiln and heated. The kiln structures have remained as one of the park’s main features. Like many of the park’s trails, it’s a great trail for sighting woodland birds and wildflowers. Canoe Creek State Park is on the path followed by numerous species of migratory birds including waterfowl, bald eagles and ospreys. The wetlands provide habitat for birds like the bluebird, oriole, red-winged blackbird and the brown thrasher.last_img read more

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Women’s hockey: No. 1 Badgers take on Bemidji State without Pankowski in WCHA conference matchup

first_imgFor the first time in a month, the University of Wisconsin women’s hockey team will be skating on their home ice against the Bemidji State University Beavers.The Badgers (9-0-1, 7-0-1 WCHA) have spent more than half the month of October on the road, with challenging matchups in almost every game. Even though this weekend’s battle is not expected to be quite as tough as others, Wisconsin will finally get the support of their home crowd.Women’s hockey: No. 1 Badgers continue undefeated start with sweep of MankatoThe University of Wisconsin women’s hockey team will come back to LaBahn Arena this week, still unbeaten and still the Read…Bemidji State (4-5-1, 2-5-1 WCHA) might not boast a fantastic record this season, but that doesn’t mean the Beavers won’t pose a threat to the Badger defense anchored by goaltender Ann-Renée Desbiens. Bemidji has handed loses to teams such as Ohio State University, Syracuse University and even No. 2 University of Minnesota.Taking down impressive teams such as these means that the Beavers have earned more than enough reason for Badgers to fear an upset. As if there wasn’t enough on their plate with the NCAA rule changes this year, the Badgers might find themselves short-handed as they try to fend off a talented team.UW’s defense will certainly have a challenging weekend ahead of them, even without the threat of special teams being used. This means that the Badger defense will not only have to do their best to prevent penalties but also be ready to jump into a penalty kill situation at any point.“We’ve had to use our [penalty kill unit] a lot this year already,” senior defensemen Jenny Ryan said. “It’s just being extra careful to make sure you’re not doing the things you know [the referee] is going to call.”No. 1 ranked Wisconsin must also deal with a modified line this weekend. The Badgers will lose junior forward Annie Pankowski for the weekend since she is competing with team USA in the Four Nations Cup. While this poses yet another obstacle for UW, junior forward Emily Clark believes that this team is ready to step up to the challenge.“[Bemidji] is always hard to play against,” Clark said. “They work hard, and they clog up the middle. I think it’s just going to be a tough weekend, especially with [line mate Pankowski] at [the Four Nations Cup] and a shorter bench, but I think we’re excited for Saturday night.”The Badgers hit the ice at 2 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. Sunday, with live statistics presented online via UWAthletics for both matches.last_img read more

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