Not yet done

first_imgA rowdy Ohiri Field had to wait a nail-biting 30:18 for Harvard to score the first goal of its second-round soccer match in the NCAA tournament against the Monmouth Hawks. But once the Crimson got on the board Sunday (Nov. 22), they couldn’t be stopped.Second-team, All-Ivy defender Richard Smith ’13 rebounded the ball in a crowded penalty box after two Crimson shots hit the crossbar. He found an opening and booted the ball into the back of the net to start the scoring. Harvard followed with two more goals in the second half to hand Monmouth (18-2-2) just its second loss of the season, 3-0.In a game marred by rough physical play, three players on each team were issued yellow cards, and the Crimson finished the game with a season-high 24 fouls. Worried that the game might get out of hand, at one point second-year head coach Jamie Clark strongly urged his team to keep on the ball and stay focused.“The fouls were 15-9 in the first half, and that’s more fouls than we usually commit in a full game,” said Clark. “I just didn’t want the game to get away from us. We’ve seen 1-0 leads evaporate before, and you just have to make sure you’re really tight.”In the second half, senior co-captain and 2009 Ivy Player of the Year Andre Akpan ’10 gave Harvard a 2-0 lead in the 67th minute, when the fleet forward split two defenders and fired the ball past the Monmouth goalkeeper for his 12th goal of the season and 47th of his career, tying Chris Ohiri’s ’64 all-time record.Akpan’s tally was followed by a goal from senior midfielder Adam Rousmaniere in the 85th minute, putting a final exclamation point on the win. Off a free kick, Rousmaniere bent the ball around three Monmouth defenders and past the Hawks goalkeeper.“From the beginning, we knew it was going to be a little chippy; we knew it was going to be a battle,” said Akpan. “We’ve tried to make a point of coming out strong every game, and that’s what we did. But they did too. So it was kind of two teams butting heads from the beginning.”“I think it was a great game,” said Clark. “For the most part it was a 1-0 game. A few moments of brilliance separated the game, and I thought that was the only difference between the two teams.”When asked what it might mean to become the Crimson’s all-time goal-scorer next week in his final collegiate game on Ohiri Field, Akpan said humbly, “It would be huge; it would mean the world. But I’d rather we score 10 goals and I score zero, and we win this game and get to the Elite Eight. Hopefully, I can continue to score goals in my life, but this is my last chance to make it far in the tournament. That’s what I’m really looking for.”The 10th-seeded Crimson (14-3-1) will continue their stirring run by hosting the Maryland Terrapins on Sunday (Nov. 29).last_img read more

Read more

Syracuse-Middle Tennessee State game time set for 6:10 p.m. on Sunday

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on March 18, 2016 at 10:43 pm Contact Jesse: [email protected] | @dougherty_jesse Related Stories 10 fun facts about Middle Tennessee StateSyracuse basketball opponent preview: What to know about Middle Tennessee StateTime Machine: 15th-seeded Richmond upsets 2nd-seeded Syracuse, 73-69No. 15 seed Middle Tennessee State shocks No. 2 seed Michigan State, will face Syracuse on SundaySyracuse puts 2014 NCAA Tournament loss to Dayton in past with 70-51 win over Flyerscenter_img Tenth-seeded Syracuse and 15th-seeded Middle Tennessee State will tip off at 6:10 p.m. on Sunday, the NCAA announced Friday night. The game will be televised on TNT and be played at the Scottrade Center in St. Louis, the site of the each team’s Round of 64 matchup.In those games, the Orange beat 10th-seeded Dayton 70-51 and MTSU pulled off a colossal 90-81 upset of second-seeded Michigan State. The winner of the game will advance to the Sweet 16 in Chicago to play the winner of Utah and Gonzaga next weekend, where games will be played on Friday and Saturday.Both SU and the Blue Raiders will speak with the media and have closed practices on Saturday, and you can follow all of The Daily Orange’s coverage of that here. Commentslast_img read more

Read more

ACC delays competitions for fall Olympic sports until Sept. 1

first_imgThe Daily Orange is a nonprofit newsroom that receives no funding from Syracuse University. Consider donating today to support our mission.The Atlantic Coast Conference has delayed all fall games and exhibitions for Olympic sports until Sept. 1, affecting the Orange’s cross country, soccer, field hockey and volleyball teams.The delay comes less than a day after the Ivy League announced it would cancel all fall sports.“The decision allows each campus to further focus on ensuring return-to-competition protocols are in place to facilitate the re-socialization process,” the ACC said in a press release.Practices for the affected sports can continue during the month of August, and schools will continue their offseason, voluntary workout protocols “in anticipation of a fall season,” according to the release.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse’s six teams played last August in 14 games or exhibitions, including four Olympic sports. Men’s soccer, women’s soccer and field hockey all had their season-openers before September, and how the ACC’s delay through Sept. 1 will affect those teams in 2020 remains unclear. Football is currently the only sport with a schedule released for this season.Syracuse announced June 2 that players would start returning to campus on June 8 for voluntary offseason workouts. The workouts began with about 65 football players — separated in pods of 10 and isolated until a negative COVID-19 test result was received — and expanded by about 20 in phase two. Other sports, such as men’s and women’s basketball, have also begun returning players to campus.Back in March, the Ivy League was the first to cancel both its men’s and women’s basketball postseason tournaments, as well as all spring sports. Over the next two days, all other conferences did the same, sending athletes home for online classes the rest of the semester.Four months later, athletic departments are crawling through the opening stages of voluntary workouts and attempting to prevent COVID-19 outbreaks on campus. Still, dozens of schools have encountered positive tests, forcing some, including North Carolina and Ohio State, to pause the workouts.The ACC’s decision, which was made “understanding that there may be future changes,” has allowed Syracuse and other conference schools extra flexibility for their preseason timelines — avoiding, at this point, a drastic alteration to the fall sports timeline. Published on July 9, 2020 at 1:11 pm Contact Andrew: [email protected] | @CraneAndrew Commentscenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Read more