Oblatoo search engine offers 1p for charity for every search

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Oblatoo is offering a downloadable toolbar to help make it easier for users to use its search engine.It includes a current list of income for each charity. The Teenage Cancer Trust is currently far in the lead of other charities, generating 40% of the total income, worth £279.91.The site was set up by Nottingham University graduate Tim Fouracre and Andrew Dodson who, according to student publication ‘Impact magazine’, “realised that the Internet search engine is a powerful money-spinning machine that could be redirected to suit better purposes.” Oblatoo search engine offers 1p for charity for every search  35 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.center_img Oblatoo is a new search engine which is offering to donate 1p for every search it generates using Google search results.Oblatoo, derived from the word “oblation”, meaning a charitable offering or gift, has been set up as a not-for-profit company. Launched in January 2006 and improved last month when it teamed up with Google to provide its search results, Oblatoo aims to generate £1 million for charities, although at this early stage it has generated just over £700.Charities signed up to benefit include Shelter, Teenage Cancer Trust, Oxfam, Christian Aid, UNICEF and Water Aid. Advertisement Tagged with: Digital Howard Lake | 18 September 2006 | Newslast_img read more

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