Paul McCartney Shares 1971 Home Demo For John Lennon-Inspired Wings Track [Listen]

first_imgToday, Paul McCartney shared the home-recorded demo of “Dear Friend” from Wings‘ Wild Life. Inspired by Beatles bandmate John Lennon, the previously-unreleased demo features a solo McCartney on piano and vocals. The demo will be featured on the upcoming reissue of the 1971 record, which will be paired with the reissue of 1973’s Red Rose Speedway, set to drop on December 7th, 2018.With the release of “Dear Friend”, McCartney told Rolling Stone that the song is “sort of me talking to John after we’d had all the sort of disputes about The Beatles break up.” He continues, “I find it very emotional when I listen to it now. I have to sort of choke it back. I remember when I heard the song recently, listening to the roughs [remastering works-in-progress] in the car. And I thought, ‘Oh God’. That lyric: ‘Really truly, young and newly wed’. Listening to that was like, ‘Oh my God, it’s true!’ I’m trying to say to John, ‘Look, you know, it’s all cool. Have a glass of wine. Let’s be cool.’”He added, “Luckily we did get it back together, which was like a great source of joy because it would have been terrible if he’d been killed as things were at that point and I’d never got to straighten it out with him. This was me reaching out. So, I think it’s very powerful in some very simple way. But it was certainly heartfelt.”Paul McCartney’s reissues for Wings’ Wild Life and Red Rose Speedway are due out on December 7th and will feature rough mixes, home recordings, b-sides, single edits, and other unreleased material, along with rare footage of acoustic home videos, rehearsals, and more. For more information on the upcoming Wings release, head here.You can listen to the 1971 home demo for “Dear Friend” below, as well as the 2018 remastered version.Paul McCartney – “Dear Friend”<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>last_img read more

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Deputies make 2nd arrest in deadly dirt bike crash investigation

first_imgThe sheriff’s office charged 50-year-old Eric VanFossen of Endicott with manslaughter in the 2nd degree, a felony. 48-year-old John Hughes was charged with manslaughter Tuesday night. (WBNG) — The Broome County Sheriff’s Office says it has made a second arrest in an investigation into a dirt bike crash that left one person dead and another charged with manslaughter. Authorities determined VanFossen participated in the events which lead to 24-year-old Cameron Fortner crashing into a van parked on Airport Road. Earlier Tuesday evening, the sheriff’s office says it issued Fortner numerous traffic tickets for performing “burnouts” on the road. Authorities say the investigation is ongoing and anyone with information is asked to contact the Broome County Sheriff’s Office.last_img read more

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Badgers prep for Hoosiers’ ace southpaw

first_imgJunior Karla Powell and the Wisconsin Badgers have won two consecutive games in a season that has wildly exceeded expectations.[/media-credit]The Wisconsin softball team swept South Dakota State Wednesday, but the Badgers now face one of their toughest tests of the season. Traveling to Bloomington, Ind., for a weekend series against the Hoosiers, Wisconsin will have an opportunity to test its mettle against one of the best teams in the Big Ten.When Wisconsin (22-15, 2-4) faces Indiana (22-15, 6-2), the Badgers will face one of the best pitchers the conference has to offer. Hoosier southpaw Morgan Melloh (20-14) can do it all, as the senior leads the Big Ten in innings pitched (215), strikeouts (325) and is second in wins (20). Melloh also boasts a 1.89 ERA, providing the Badger hitters with a mountainous task for the weekend series.It’s a challenge head coach Yvette Healy likened to an earlier road series against Penn State and its two pitching aces, Lisa Akamine and Jackie Hill.“Melloh is really phenomenal,” Healy said. “We’re going to have to get creative offensively to see what we can do. Against Penn State, we moved around in the box a little bit and kept them off balance. We had a ton of base runners in that series, and they had phenomenal pitchers, as well.”Junior Karla Powell voiced the same need for creativity for the upcoming games.“As a team, we’re going to try different things in the box; we’ll definitely need to see the ball well this weekend,” Powell said. “From an individual standpoint, I’ll just stay within my self and play my game.”Another way the Badgers may sport a different look against Indiana is at first base. Senior Dana Rasmussen has recently found herself in the Badgers’ starting lineup, replacing the injured Michelle Mueller at first base against South Dakota State. Rasmussen, a homegrown player who played for Madison East, is getting used to this new position.“I’ve never really played first base; it’s the one position I haven’t ever excelled at,” Rasmussen said. “On Tuesday, I told Coach Healy if she ever needed anyone to play first base to let me know. She was like ‘OK. By the way, you’re playing first today.’”While the Badgers will face an obstacle on the mound, they will see a considerably smaller one offensively. Indiana ranks second-to-last in team batting average (.252) but still sports a few capable threats in its lineup.Hoosier senior Sara Olson sports a terrific .335 batting average as well as seven home runs and 27 RBIs. Providing the Hoosiers a spark at the leadoff position and a compliment to Olson is sophomore Breanna Saucedo, commanding a .331 average and 43 hits already on the season.Facing an Indiana team that allows only 2.3 runs per contest, the Badgers will look to neutralize Olson and Saucedo to keep the Hoosier offense in the doldrums.“Olson was great in Indiana’s win against Michigan,” Healy said. “We have to be careful around her and hopefully get in situations where we don’t have to give in to her. Hopefully we can go toe to toe with the rest of the Indiana team and be careful with their big hitters.”Indiana, currently one game behind Michigan for first place in the Big Ten and as winners of 13 of its last 16, is the only conference team to beat the Wolverines this season. If the Badgers are looking for a quality opponent to measure their progress against this season, the Hoosiers fit the description.“It’s a huge series this weekend – if you lose both games, no one would be surprised,” Healy said. “But if we can go out and make a statement and split with them, it’d be a huge win for us, a big RPI win; they’re 30 in the rankings.”“We’re doing really well; we have one of the best records we’ve had in a long time,” Powell said. “We discussed that last night after the game. If we keep splitting our series or taking both games against teams that aren’t expecting us to, its going to help us, not only in the standings, but help us down the road for an NCAA bid.”The Badgers will most likely send their ace pitcher, freshman Cassandra Darrah (12-5), to the mound to counter Melloh. While the Badgers have come back multiple times throughout the season, Healy and the Badgers hope to propel themselves out of the gates early and never look back.“We’ve had nice chances and been ahead in games we’ve lost,” Healy said. “I just want to see the girls close and play hard. To win a game at Indiana, you’re not going to win just playing your normal game. We’ll have to make some great diving catches, stolen bases and some key hits. They have to have that mentality about them of doing something special.”last_img read more

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Yorkshire skipper hails the ‘golden oldies’ of English golf

first_img11 Oct 2019 Yorkshire skipper hails the ‘golden oldies’ of English golf Tags: Dorset, Lincolnshire, Senior Men’s County Finals, Surrey, Sussex, Yorkshire Yorkshire’s John Grimbleby has highlighted the strength in depth of the game at senior county level after guiding his team to a thrilling title.Grimbleby captained the eight-man Yorkshire side which edged out a battling Sussex side in the Senior Men’s County Finals held this week at Effingham GC in Surrey.For the second year running it was a tense finale to a hard-fought competition with the championship going down to the last two games left on the course.Andy King holed the winning putt for Yorkshire to break Sussex hearts once again – for three years in succession Rick Thomas’ side have finished runners up by the narrowest of margins.King was unbeaten in his games over the three days of round robin competition also featuring teams from Dorset and Lincolnshire.At 65, Steve Mason won four of his five games for Yorkshire proving that although the side had two proven internationals in Richard Norton and Rich Jones they were certainly far from reliant on their England caps.Grimbleby (pictured above with Mason) was not only full of praise for his team but also the standard of play on show from all four counties and sang the praises of those players featuring regularly on the seniors’ circuit“It’s a tough format to end a long season for many of these players who have been involved in a lot of county and international events,” said Grimbleby, honorary secretary at Howley Hall GC.“But when you see the level of performance from my players – and all of the teams, to be truthful – it shows you just how strong the game is at senior level in England.“The good thing about the success of championships such as this one is that will simply encourage more seniors to push to get involved.“As well as the players on show at Effingham this week there are a lot of really good players at county level and more and more of them are remaining competitive for longer.“This can only be good for the seniors’ game at club and county level.”Yorkshire knew that only a victory in the match with Sussex would do as they looked to follow up a 2017 success at Goswick GC with a second seniors title.And when King and then Alan Wright earned half points in the final two matches to guarantee a 5-4 win the bubbly was uncorked.Grimbleby missed out on skippering Yorkshire to victory in 2017 as his wife was recuperating from knee surgery.Now he’s got a taste for winning he’s keen to play a role in helping Yorkshire defend their title in Torquay next season.“I had thought about stepping aside from the captaincy, but not now,” said Grimbleby with a chuckle.“These are a great bunch of boys to work with and the whole week is a great celebration of all that’s good about seniors golf.“I’d love to be involved again next season.” Photograph credit: Leaderboard For details of final scoring from Senior Men’s County Finals click herelast_img read more

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Andrews powers Leafs past Border Bruins 4-2

first_imgAfter a scoreless second period, the Leafs scored twice during a three minute span in the third to secure the victory.Andrews, on the power play, and Kyle Chernenkoff, gave Nelson a 4-1 advantage.Trey Mason beat Patrick Ostermann in the Nelson nets for the game’s final goal.Nelson out shot the Bruins 33-23 in the contest.The Leafs continue a three-game-in-three-night stint tonight in Fernie against the Ghostriders before returning home Saturday to face the defending KIJHL champion Kimberley Dynamiters at 7 p.m. in the NDCC Arena.Meanwhile the Bruins host Castlegar Sunday at 2 p.m. in the Grand Forks Arena.BLUELINES: Cleary Ambrose, signed at the roster deadline, was in the lineup for the Leafs. . . . Netminder Josh Williams, 18, also joining Nelson at the deadline from the Bonnyville Pontiacs of the AJHL, was not dressed. Kootenay Ice goalie Kurt Doyle was the second goalie dressed for Nelson. .  . .The Leafs welcomes more than 80 international students to the game. Blair Andrews scored twice and added an assist to spark the Nelson Leafs to a 4-2 Kootenay International Junior Hockey League victory over the Grand Forks Border Bruins Thursday night at the NDCC Arena.The victory moves the Leafs into a third-place tie in points with the Bruins, who have lost three straight games. Both teams have 35 points but Nelson has one more victory than the Bruins.Andrews opened the scoring in the first period on an innocent looking play. With the Leafs securing possession in the Bruins zone, Andrews slid a weak backhand that somehow got past Anthony Gilliart in the Grand Forks net.Chad Grambo tied the game four minutes later. But Kolten Nelson, scoring his third of the season, gave the Leafs the one-goal advantage heading into the first-period break.last_img read more

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5 Great Tools for Packrats and Clutterbugs

first_imgWhile the rest of the world is digitizing and consolidating their belongings, some of us just can’t stop being the pack rats that we are. While the Kindle offers a good daytime reading experience, it’s tough to justify taking it into the bath or falling asleep with it nestled against your cheek. My home is filled with books I no longer need but love to lend out. Whether your home is filled with books, camping gear, vinyls or video games, if you’re a collector below are some tools to help you manage your stuff: 1. 5ftShelf: According to the site’s intro Harvard University’s president once claimed that, “…a liberal education could be achieved by reading a collection of books that would total no more than 5ft in width.” In addition to your list of quintessential books, 5ft Shelf offers collectors a chance to showcase their favorite albums and movies. While the Ultimate Shelf (popular section) largely consists of classic works, a few contemporary works including the Twilight novel are also listed. Related Posts Tags:#start#startups dana oshiro 2. Delicious Monster: Delicious Monster allows users to scan their CDs, DVDs, video games and books using a webcam UPC reader. From here users are shown a photo-realistic shelf where all of their real-life products are displayed. 3. MyThings: MyThings also offers users a chance to index their physical objects and keep track of receipts and warranties in one place. One of the interesting components of MyThings is that in the event of a break-in, your MyThings database can be immediately sent to Trace.com – a tool that tracks lost and stolen property. 4. Neighborgoods: ReadWriteWeb covered Neighborgoods’ launch in early October. This service allows users to interact in a hyper-local manner by indexing their goods for loan to their neighbors. Neighbors lends out lawnmowers, power washers and ladders to others in their area. The system will keep a running record of all your goods. 5. BookMooch: Bookmooch is a book exchange site where users list the books they’d like to give away and send them out once other members make requests. For every book you send, you are entitled to a book from another member. This is a great way to get rid of your unwanted books. The service also offers the option to donate books to charity. Photo Credits: Jane Rahman Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…last_img read more

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iPad: $1 Billion Later, What Do You Think of It Now?

first_imgmarshall kirkpatrick Tags:#Analysis#Apple#mobile#web The iPad has passed $1 billion in sales, according to simple multiplication of the company’s 2 million announced-sales of the product after a mere two months of availability. Earlier this month, Yankee Group analyst Carl Howe predicted that the iPad would become the fastest consumer product in history to hit the $1 billion mark. While that’s a tough call to make definitively, it is undeniable that the iPad has surpassed mere hype and made at least a commercial splash. Some analysts believe it is changing the nature of personal computing, too. What do you think?Here are some of the most interesting opinions I’ve come across lately. “The iPad is a new kind of PC. It ushers in a new era of Curated Computing — a mode of computing in which choice is constrained to deliver more relevant, less complex experiences. Curated Computing is necessary to empower alternative form factors, such as touchscreen tablets, wearable and ambient devices, game consoles, and connected TVs. The iPad’s Curated Computing experience makes the tablet form factor viable for the first time since it was introduced commercially more than two decades ago.” – Forrester’s Sarah Rotman Epps, Apple’s iPad is a New Kind of PC. (Brings to mind Chris Messina’s Death of the URL.)“In my initial review, I focused on capabilities. And tablets are stuck between the power and utility of the notebook and the size and features of a smartphone. But they also create a middle place in terms of usability. And that is what I missed in my first day with the iPad. It feels less like a computer than any computing device I’ve owned. It’s easy on me in a way that the other devices are not. So I’m now convinced that tablets will have an important place in our homes and our lives.”– Tech investor Fred Wilson, I’ve Changed My Mind About the iPad. Wilson has also said that he prefers reading content in mobile Safari over content-centric apps. Take that, curated web. Wilson’s appreciation of the iPad’s usability contradicts with usability expert Jakob Nielsen’s assessment :“iPad apps are inconsistent and have low feature discoverability, with frequent user errors due to accidental gestures. An overly strong print metaphor and weird interaction styles cause further usability problems.”Personally, I love mine. I wish there were more apps, but I really enjoy using Facebook, YouTube, Twitterific and a number of other apps on it. It feels casual, efficient, enjoyable. It helps me get my laundry folded and my dishes done. I like it, a lot. My wife says it doesn’t feel crazy, novel and magical anymore – now it feels indispensable and integrated into our lives. “It’s like finding a lover,” she says. “At first everything they do is exciting, but over time a good lover becomes more of a real person. Some of the initial fascination is gone, but it becomes a super important part of your life. And like a good lover, in time it becomes difficult to imagine going to bed without it each night.” I’m not entirely sure how I feel about that, but I appreciate her letting me quote her saying it in this post. So far at least, I do not feel jealous of the iPad.What’s your take on the iPad? What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfacescenter_img Related Posts Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more

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Anglo-Asian pop group Monsoon puts Indian music on to a 12-inch discomix

first_imgSheila Chandra: Popular blend of East and WestAs the 1982 Festival Of India, in London moves towards the half-way mark, a new sound has emerged which may well epitomise the newly strengthened relations between Britain and India. It is the soothing strains of an Anglo-Asian pop group called Monsoon, the,Sheila Chandra: Popular blend of East and WestAs the 1982 Festival Of India, in London moves towards the half-way mark, a new sound has emerged which may well epitomise the newly strengthened relations between Britain and India. It is the soothing strains of an Anglo-Asian pop group called Monsoon, the first band to put Indian music on to a 12-inch discomix.The group made their debut, last year, at India’s Independence Day celebrations in London, and were formally presented to the public this year at the newly-opened exhibition ‘Britain and India’ at the Commonwealth Institute. By March they were inching up the British pop charts determined to make it to the Top Ten, which they did.Sheila Chandra, the shapely 17-year-old Indian girl, who provides the vocals for the group’s hit-song Ever so Lonely, drapes herself in a clinging sari. While singing, her hands form the traditional Indian dance gestures, an unusual sight for Britain’s pop music lovers. Exuding a rare kind of Indianness, Chandra, a product of an Indian father and a half-Indian and half-British mother, sports a sensuous tear-drop bindi and long snaky tresses tied in a guru knot to the left of her head.Popular Blend: There is no doubt that her new kind of music has become very popular. Says the tall, charming Chandra about her music: “It’s a blend of two cultures. It’s a new sound. We are trying to draw the two cultures closer together and our blend provides a common denominator – with the dance beat there’s something everyone can relate to.”advertisementChandra, presently studying for her A-Levels, went to London’s Italia Conti drama school at the age of 15 and studied dancing, acting and the compulsory lessons, which ironically led her to Monsoon. But Chandra’s success does not entirely rest on her training. The man behind the group’s spiral up the charts is dancing, acting and the compulsoty a large, cheerful Yorkshireman, Steve Coe, who discovered Chandra and is also producer and lyricist for the groupl Coe stumbled into Indian music by chance. Said he: “I had an Indian girlfriend and we both used to listen to Hindi film songs on the car cassette radio. The old Mohammed Rafi numbers of the late ’60s really fascinated me. I thought this is good. It’s got style and it’s experimental.” Chance again took him to a recording studio where he heard a demo tape made by Chandra. “I was looking for something new and her voice attracted me,” he recalls. The result was Monsoon comprising of five members, two of them Indian: Dari Mankoo, the sitarist and of course Chandra, the lead vocalist.Monsoon make music reminiscent of the prelude to a 1950s’ Bombay melody. The sound is recognisably pop but Coe’s arrangement uses sitar, piano, guitar, tabla and percussion all synchronised with Chandra’s slightly understated voice. The combination of voice and instrument taking forward a melody is new to western music Coe believes Monsoon could be a ‘pivot group’. “It could turn people towards the East to find new sounds.”Meanwhile Chandra is convinced that success will not spoil her. Says she: “I think success has given me confidence but I don’t think I have changed. I still live at home with my mother and father.” She is still escorted to shows by her mother, who is also a singer. Chandra believes that Monsoon will have a wide appeal for both Western and Asian audiences. “I don’t think we’ll ever run out of ideas,” said a confident Chandra.last_img read more

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Man drunk and speeding before crash that killed BC Mountie Crown

first_imgCOLWOOD, B.C. – A man who sped his truck through a red light and rammed a RCMP cruiser, killing the officer inside, had a blood-alcohol level more than three times the legal limit, the Crown said Wednesday.Crown attorney Tim Stokes told Kenneth Fenton’s sentencing hearing the man’s truck was estimated to be going as fast as 90 kilometres an hour in a 50-kilometre zone when it entered the intersection and slammed into Const. Sarah Beckett’s vehicle in April 2016.Stokes told the court, Fenton, 29, had been drinking beer and was distraught over the recent suicide of a friend. He refused to provide a breath or blood sample, but police obtained a warrant within an hour of the crash to analyze blood taken from Fenton while he was at the hospital, the court heard.Fenton’s blood-alcohol reading was .287 milligrams of alcohol in 100 millilitres of blood, Stokes said. The legal blood-alcohol limit is .08.The Crown is seeking a sentence of between three and five years in prison. Defence lawyer Dale Marshall said an appropriate sentence would be three years in prison.Stokes said the court must consider Fenton’s level of impairment and vehicle speed in the sentence.“He was quite oblivious to the fact he was entering an intersection where the light was red,” he said.Marshall said Fenton pleaded guilty almost immediately and will address the court to express his remorse.Fenton’s sentencing hearing was expected to be completed Wednesday, but it was adjourned late Wednesday until July 6 to set another date to for the hearing to continue.At the time of the crash, Fenton’s truck was being followed by another RCMP vehicle after that officer noticed the tail lights were out, Stokes said.He described the crash as an explosion of glass and smoke to a full courtroom in Colwood, B.C., as people sitting in the gallery held tissues and wiped away tears.Stokes said the truck hit Beckett’s vehicle on the driver side and an autopsy determined Beckett’s death was caused by blunt force trauma.He said a witness at the accident scene reported hearing Fenton say “one stupid decision.”Fenton pleaded guilty last month to charges of impaired driving and dangerous driving causing the death of Beckett, a mother of two boys who had recently returned to the West Shore RCMP detachment from maternity leave.Beckett’s husband, Brad Aschenbrenner, read his victim impact statement to the court.His hands shook and his voice was low and cracked at times when he told the court about losing the love of his life and the mother of their young sons, Lucas and Emmett.The hardest thing after his wife’s death was telling six-year-old Lucas “mommy wasn’t coming home,” Aschenbrenner said.His youngest son was two years old when his mother died and “will have no memory of her at all,” he added.He said the family tries to celebrate Christmas, Halloween and Thanksgiving, but “there’s always the undercurrent of sadness and loss.”He has not been able to work, and suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and anxiety, he said.Aschenbrenner said he left his family in Idaho to come to Canada to be with Beckett. He is scheduled to get his Canadian citizenship at a ceremony on Friday.In a written victim impact statement submitted to the court, Beckett’s mother, Gurcharn Beckett said she is haunted by her daughter’s cruel and sudden death.“I wonder did she see death rushing at her? Did she have a moment?”last_img read more

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