Chelsea hopes boosted as Hudson-Odoi cools on Bayern

first_imgCallum Hudson-Odoi is set to make a decision on his future in the coming days, with Chelsea growing increasingly confident he will commit his future to the Stamford Bridge outfit.With Bayern Munich offering £35 million ($45.3m) to take the teenager to the Allianz Arena and with first-team opportunities hard to come by, Hudson-Odoi had been pushing for a move to the Bundesliga champions.But Goal now understands that after a run of games in the first team in early 2019 and talk of a contract in west London that would be a better illustration of his true value, he is considering remaining with his boyhood club. Article continues below Editors’ Picks ‘There is no creativity’ – Can Solskjaer get Man Utd scoring freely again? ‘Everyone legged it on to the pitch!’ – How Foden went from Man City superfan to future superstar Emery out of jail – for now – as brilliant Pepe papers over Arsenal’s cracks What is Manchester United’s ownership situation and how would Kevin Glazer’s sale of shares affect the club? The Blues are willing to offer Hudson-Odoi a deal worth £70,000-a-week to tempt him to stay in west London despite him only having made 13 senior appearances.Bayern now face a fight themselves to convince a player who, despite not handing in an official transfer request, saw his next move as joining them and following in the footsteps of fellow Under-17 World Cup winner Jadon Sancho in swapping the Premier League for the German top-flight.The Bavarians have even offered the 18-year-old the No.10 shirt that Arjen Robben will vacate at the end of the season, and with Franck Ribery also set to depart Bayern, Hudson-Odoi was promised a prominent role in Niko Kovac’s rebuilding job in Munich.Callum Hudson-Odoi Chelsea 2018-19Ahead of Bayern’s first bid for the wideman in late December he had played just 215 minutes under Chelsea boss Maurizio Sarri despite an encouraging pre-season that ended with him being offered a new five-year contract.That lack of game time saw him turn down the offer of committing his future to the club, but since Bayern’s interest he has become more of a regular under Sarri.He has already doubled his game time for the season in the last month, with two league appearances and a start in the Carabao Cup semi-final first leg against Tottenham under his belt.The teenager featured off the bench in Saturday’s win over Newcastle, when the Stamford Bridge faithful greeted him with a rendition of ‘Hudson-Odoi, we want you to stay’.As a player who joined the club at the age of eight, such a show of faith from supporters could yet play a part in him deciding against a departure to the continent and remaining at Chelsea.last_img read more

Read more

Church of England sees fall in planned donations for first time in

“Their commitment has grown individually by 27 per cent or roughly four per cent a year, enabling the overall sum to rise by 10 per cent.“But in 2016 for the first time the total coming out of planned giving declined,” he said. The debate over the Archbishops’ Council’s budget for 2019, which sets out the national church’s spending priorities, also heard from members who were concerned that millennials were not donating to local churches.Julie Dziegiel, the treasurer of a parish in the diocese of Oxford, said: “We need to address the issue of giving by our millennial generation, the future of the church, but they are saddled with student debt and looking at being unable to buy a house.”Mr Spence said the church was introducing initiatives such as contactless collection and text giving to appeal to millennials.He said contactless collection at services “can be very useful for churches that have significant numbers of visitors or when people come for weddings or funerals.“They so often don’t have cash in their pockets, so they can be deployed then, and these are the sorts of things we need to do to have a more enterprising future.”Annika Mathews, a member of the Church of England youth council, said young people were likely to move from church to church as they studied and moved for jobs, and so found it difficult to commit to regular giving. “I have been to about four different churches in the past few years, from moving around from year to year.“It would be helpful for young people to have some online ways of giving, maybe some monthly debits to the church, as we – and I speak for myself at least – don’t tend to carry change all the time to churches,” she said. The Church of England has seen a fall in planned donations for first time in 50 years as it says millennials are not taking up the mantle of previous generations.Money given through direct debits and standing orders has fallen for the first time since records began in 1964, it was revealed on Monday.John Spence, chair of the Archbishops’ Council Finance Committee, told its governing body, the General Synod, that in 2016 income coming from planned giving fell by 0.4 per cent.Figures for 2015 show that a total of £337.5m was given to the church this way, suggesting that there was a fall of around £1.35m in 2016.The donations formed around a third of the money collected by parishes in 2015, which Mr Spence said rose by 1.8 per cent overall because of other sources of funds.He warned that young people were not replacing older churchgoers in donating money to the church, which was leading to a dent in income.“An 81 year old is eight times more likely to go to church than an 18 year old.“And that’s having its impact on finance. The numbers of people in our planned giving schemes declined by 13 per cent since 2010. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Read more