Black Eyed Peas Taboo To Rock The World For Charity

first_imgOn Saturday, September 29th, Black Eyed Peas’ Taboo will bring his high energy performance to Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, CA to support music education at the inaugural Rock Their World Celebration, a fundraiser and celebration of national nonprofit Little Kids Rock’s decade of service, restoring and revitalizing music education for disadvantaged public schools nationwide.He’ll join “Red Rocker” Sammy Hagar, and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame musician and Adopt the Arts founder Matt Sorum (Guns N’ Roses, Velvet Revolver), as well as local Little Kids Rock students at this musical fundraiser.More information on this event and Taboo’s participation is available here.Taboo has been a vocal supporter of Little Kids Rock, a leading nonprofit provider of free musical instruments and music classes to underprivileged children. Started by a single Bay Area teacher in California in 2002, it has since grown to attract the support of over 1,200 public school teachers who have proactively banded together to provide free, Little Kids Rock music classes to children in their schools. Over 200,000 public school children in 24 cities in 12 states have since benefited from the program.Taboo first got involved with Little Kids Rock more than a year ago when he surprised students at their end-of-year concert by hopping onstage with them to perform the Black Eyed Peas hit, I Gotta Feelin’. “I am all about the youth,” Taboo said. “I am all about the next big thing. Our kids are the next big thing and I will do anything I can do to support them. That’s why I support Little Kids Rock.” The kids inspired him so much that he brought them to a recording studio to record an original song with him.“Our students are so fortunate to have the support of Taboo, who is an inspiring performer, but also an engaged and committed philanthropist,” says Little Kids Rock Founder and Executive Director, David Wish.last_img read more

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Last Cabinet Meeting Drones too expensive says Independent Candidate

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, TCI, December 6, 2016 – Tomorrow December 7 is the final meeting of Cabinet until after the 2016 General Elections and in the previous sitting; much was discussed including testing for drone surveillance.‘The War Room’ host and independent candidate running at large, Jasmin Walkin said the cost of introducing drones is underestimated by the Premier.“These are numbers that I’ve found on several websites regarding surveillance and border control drones. Those drones can cause from twenty-five hundred to thirty-five hundred per flight, what do I mean by that, that’s not the cost of the purchasing of the drones, that is the operational cost per hour. An average of a few thousand dollars per flight hour, and we’re asking for 24 hours surveillance. The daily operational cost of one drone, could be seventy-two thousand dollars, by twelve hours per day, we’re looking at thirty-six thousand dollars. The total cost of one operational surveillance drone, will be twenty-six million, two hundred and eighty thousand dollars.”Tonight, most of the independent candidates appear on Digicel Network Ch2 in a national debate moderated by Kenrick Walters and Sabrina Parker. #MagneticMediaNews Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppcenter_img Related Items:last_img read more

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San Diego proposing ordinance to regulate Segway tour companies

first_img October 17, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – San Diego plans to crack down on local Segway tour operators following a $1.7 million injury settlement in June and another lawsuit filed last spring claiming a protruding sidewalk caused the death of a Segway rider two years ago, it was reported Wednesday.An ordinance proposed by city officials would require Segway tour companies to apply for special permits, follow safety procedures and obtain commercial liability insurance of at least $2 million per case and $4 million per year, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported.The ordinance discussed aims to shrink the number of injury crashes and limit the city’s vulnerability to large payouts when injuries occur.In the case that led to the $1.7 million settlement, the tour company that rented out the Segway didn’t contribute to the payout because it didn’t have liability insurance and the company’s owner had limited assets, according to the Union-Tribune.Segways, which were invented in 2002, are two-wheeled motorized vehicles that carry one person standing upright. Segway is the name of the leading company in the industry.In order to make sure the city’s new law would also apply to competitors, it refers to the vehicles as “electronic assistive personal mobility devices,” the Union-Tribune reported.The new law would not apply to the electric scooters that have become increasingly popular in San Diego this year, according to the Union-Tribune. City officials are exploring separate legislation for those devices.The ordinance would require Segway tour companies to obtain a special permit requiring them to have adequate insurance and follow new safety procedures.Those safety procedures would include prohibiting Segway use by intoxicated people, requiring users under 18 to be accompanied by an adult, requiring tour guides to have a driver’s license and conducting on-site training for all riders before tours, the Union-Tribune reported. Companies would have to pay a $48 annual fee for a permit.The new legislation was prompted by a $1.7 million payout by the city to a woman who suffered a shattered pelvis in a Segway crash on a La Jolla street three years ago.The settlement includes $1.5 million for Regina Capobianco, who was injured when she drove a Segway over a large area of damaged street on Camino de la Costa at Winamar Avenue in July 2015, and $200,000 for her husband, Christopher Capobianco, because her injuries damaged their marriage, according to the Union-Tribune.A few months before the city settled that case in June, the family of Jeff Hassett filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the city blaming a protruding section of sidewalk in Old Town for his eventual death.The suit, filed by Hassett’s four siblings, claims Hassett struck a 3- inch to 4-inch concrete stub in the sidewalk, created by a light pole removal on Taylor Street near Congress Street, while riding a Segway in March 2016, the Union-Tribune reported. Hassett suffered broken ribs, a toe injury that required amputation and damage to an internal heart defibrillator.The heart issue and an infection eventually caused his death in May 2016, according to the Union-Tribune. The budget committee will continue to research the issue and will resume discussion at their next meeting scheduled for November 14, 2018. Updated: 11:55 AM Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwittercenter_img KUSI Newsroom San Diego proposing ordinance to regulate Segway tour companies Posted: October 17, 2018last_img read more

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