2010 South Australian State Cup

first_imgIt is the first time in over five years that an annual State Cup has been held for Touch Football in South Australia. Touch Football South Australia Business Operations Manager, Tim Wyld, believes it is an exciting time for the sport. “The reintroduction of the State Cup is a big boost for Touch Footy locally. It not only gives social participants a chance to represent their competition, but improves the technical components and pathways of the sport in a big way,” Wyld said. The competition will be fierce on the field with an intriguing blend of both metropolitan and country club teams battling it out to be crowned State Champions.The state’s largest Touch Football competition, City Touch, are raging favourites to take out the crown, with a star studded line up featuring many state players, however they will face stiff competition from the ever threatening Adelaide University Touch Club in both the Men’s and Women’s divisions.The battle to determine country champions is even more interesting with perennial powerhouses Mallee slight favourites ahead of an emerging Mount Gambier outfit keen to impress.Players will also been keen to impress throughout the weekend, with state team selections for the 2011 National Touch League occurring at the event.Players to watch include City Touch’s Kelly Rowe who recently was awarded the Most Valuable Player for the South Australian 18’s Girls team at the National Youth Championships, and her state teammate Sally Gazzard from Mount Gambier who was awarded the South Australian 18’s most improved player.In the Men’s Division, national Alliance Squad Member Michael Frost will be dangerous as will Chris Sainsbury who took out the Most Valuable Player award for the CMI Toyota State League Series earlier in the year.Regardless of this weekend’s results, this event is a win for Touch Football locally and hopefully the start of annual tradition.The State Cup commences at 10.00am on Saturday, 30 October at the City Touch fields on Greenhill Road Eastwood, with the Grand Finals occurring from 1.00pm on Sunday, 31 October. As well as the State Cup, Touch Football South Australia will also be holding its Annual Awards Dinner on Saturday, 30 October. The Awards Dinner is the defining evening where Volunteers, Coaches, Referees, Selectors and Players are presented with their awards in front of their peers.This year’s list is exceptional with many of our grass roots volunteers recognised for their outstanding efforts in developing the sport and providing a platform for the sport to launch into the future.The nominees for the 2010 TFSA Awards are:Volunteer of the YearDamien CarlsonMark JonesGerard TreloarAdministrator of the YearGreg FrostGerard TreloarKildare Rieck ScholarshipAnton Van RensburgMark JonesMadelaine McGintySharlean McNamaraTara NaigeFor more information, please visit Touch Football South Australia’s website and the South Australian State Cup website:www.touchsa.com.au www.sastatecup.mytouchfooty.comlast_img read more

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Report: Phil Jackson Will Be At Tonight’s Ohio State Game, Presumably To Scout D’Angelo Russell

first_imgThe Lakers logo on the Staples Center jumbotron.LOS ANGELES, CA – OCTOBER 28: A moment of silence is observed in honor of Philip “Flip” Saunders’ passing before the game between the Los Angeles Lakers and the Minnesota Timberwolves at Staples Center on October 28, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and condition of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)Update: Phil Jackson is in the building. In attendance tonight – One of the greatest coaches of all time…alongside Phil Jackson  #GoBucks pic.twitter.com/QfvIDzSYea— OSU BASKETBALL (@OhioStateHoops) February 26, 2015New York Knicks President Phil Jackson is at the Schottenstein Center to watch the Buckeyes and D’Angelo Russell. pic.twitter.com/CnhSXGTvhr— Lantern TV (@LanternTV) February 26, 2015Earlier: The New York Knicks have the worst record (10-46) in the NBA and are one of several franchises in tank mode as they attempt to secure the best possible odds for the 2015 NBA Draft lottery. If the Knicks do end up with the No. 1 pick in the upcoming draft, the common opinion is that they will select Duke freshman center Jahlil Okafor, but there are other possible candidates. One prospect who might be worthy of the top pick is Ohio State playmaking freshman guard D’Angelo Russell. The 6-foot-5 Russell is having a monster season in Columbus, and Knicks team president Phil Jackson is reportedly going to watch him play tonight against Nebraska. Word from the Schott that some dude named Phil Jackson will be in the house…Gee…wonder who he’s scouting?— Matt McCoy (@MattMcCoyWTVN) February 26, 2015 Jackson has to cover all of his bases. The Knicks need a lot of help, and can’t afford to bungle their lottery selection, no matter where they will pick. Either Russell or Okafor would be a win for a franchise in dire need of them.last_img read more

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Ministry Seeking to Boost Sorrel Production

first_imgThe much-loved sorrel drink has long been a favourite of Jamaicans during the Christmas period. As appetites grow for the taste of this delicious indigenous Jamaican product, so has the need for increased production of the sorrel plant, the sepals of which are used to make the drink. The Government has been working to improve efficiency in harvesting the crop, which will not only help to increase yields but aid in reducing labour costs, which is a major factor impeding productivity. Speaking recently at the opening ceremony for a sorrel harvesting training programme, Agriculture and Fisheries Minister, Hon. Roger Clarke, noted that it takes two persons approximately 15 days to harvest one acre of sorrel. This is especially challenging as the Government is also eyeing export markets for the product, which has value-added derivatives. “Sorrel not only provides the drink that Jamaicans love so dearly, but there are other value-added products such as chutney, squashes, jam, cordials, flavoured water and even ice-cream that have made a great hit in the local market and with the Jamaican Diaspora. These products would be much more competitive even on the world market if we could reduce the cost of labour,” he said. Twenty Rural Agricultural Development Authority (RADA) extension officers from across the island took part in the two-day training, where they were equipped with knowledge on production techniques to be transferred to farmers. Experts from the University of Chapingo in Mexico instructed the officers on the correct use of the sorrel harvesting machine, designed and manufactured by the university, to reduce harvesting time and cost.  They also received instruction in colour stabilisation in sorrel and secondary products. According to Specialist in Regional Integration at the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture(IICA) Alfredo Valerio, the machine is able to produce up to 40 kilograms per hour of fresh product. He explained that the machine takes the freshly cut branches and strips the calyx (sepals) from the seed pod. This, he said “takes most of the labour out of the equation.” “So, although harvesting is done manually, the machine helps stripping the…flower, keeping it fresh. The machine is able to do more work more rapidly, and production would increase,” he said. Acting Principal Director, Field Services/Operations, RADA, Winston Simpson expressed confidence that the employment of the sorrel harvesting machine would serve to increase productivity. “Once we can reduce the costs by mechanising the reaping, using these machines, then it will definitely impact on the industry and we could triple our production, because our cost of production would definitely be reduced,” he told JIS News. He lamented that 60 per cent of the cost of production for sorrel is labour and this labour intensity tends to drive away the farmers. “Farmers are paying up to $40 a pound just to strip sorrel – just to reap it,” he said. Reaping entails taking the buds from the tree and deseeding them to get the petals, which are normally used to make the end products. Mr. Simpson noted that the country also has the potential to achieve greater yields given that it already produces several varieties of sorrel on a wide scale, though mainly for domestic purposes. These are the Manchester Black, the Clarendon Black, and two varieties of the Bashment, which are reaped three times per year, yielding a tonne per acre. He informed that last year, a little over 1,100 tonnes of sorrel was reaped from 700 hectares of land, noting that mechanisation would yield even greater results. To further boost production, Mr. Simpson said RADA is also encouraging young farmers in particular, to cultivate the product, utilizing marginal lands. Whether enjoyed with a dash of ginger or a shot of rum, sorrel continues to be a drink of choice for many, and with the promise of increased production through the use of technology, Jamaicans and foreigners alike can rest assured of an ample supply of the product to savour for years to come.last_img read more

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US judge returns foster mothers passport days after child abandonment charge dropped

first_imgHouston: The Indian-American foster mother of Sherin Mathews has got her passport back, nearly a week after charges were dropped against her in connection with the tragic death of her 3-year-old daughter, whose body was discovered in a culvert in suburban Dallas in 2017. Sini Mathews was charged with child endangerment after she left her adoptive daughter Sherin alone at home while she and her husband Wesley Mathews went out for dinner with their 4-four-year old biological daughter on the night before the toddler was reported missing from their house in Richardson, Texas. Also Read – Imran Khan arrives in China, to meet Prez Xi JinpingSini had been jailed on a child abandonment charge, but the charge was dismissed after the district attorney said there was not enough evidence to move forward and released her from the Dallas County Jail. On Thursday, a Dallas judge ordered authorities to return Sini’s passport, WBAP, an AM News/Talk radio station in Dallas reported. Defence attorney Heath Harris said the judge had little choice but to return the passport which was taken when Sini was arrested. He said Sini had no plans to go anywhere, but can do so if she chooses so. Also Read – US blacklists 28 Chinese entities over abuses in Xinjiang”I am blessed,” Sini, a nurse, said after the charges against her were dropped and told the media that she was looking forward to meeting her biological daughter. “I want to thank the DA’s office for dismissing the case and I am looking forward to being reunited with my daughter,” Sini said. She had lost parental rights to her biological daughter who has been adopted by her relatives in Houston. Lawyers are now reviewing options to possibly return her to her mother, Sini, the WBAP report said. Sini’s husband Wesley is still in Dallas County Jail for capital murder linked to Sherin’s death. He will face trial in May this year and is presently being held on a USD 1.1 million bond. Sini and Wesley, who hail from Kerala, adopted Sherin from an orphanage in Bihar in July 2016. After Sherin disappeared, Wesley had first claimed that he had punished her by making her stand outside their home at 3 am for not drinking her milk. After Sherin’s body was found in a culvert a kilometre from their home in October, 2017, Wesley then changed his version to he had tried to feed her the milk and that she choked on it. Wesley was indicted for capital murder by a grand jury and for tampering with evidence. Wesley, if convicted, could face the death penalty or an automatic sentence of life without parole.last_img read more

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Release of Modi biopic delayed

first_imgMumbai: The release of “PM Narendra Modi”, a biopic on the prime minister, has been pushed indefinitely, its producer Sandip Singh said on Thursday, a day before the film was scheduled to be screened in theatres across the country.Sources in the Central Board of Film Certification (CBFC) said the film is yet to get a clearance. The film was initially set to release on April 12, but producers had advanced it by a week, claiming “public demand”. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c details”This is to confirm, our film ‘PM Narendra Modi’ is not releasing on 5th April. Will update soon,” Singh posted on Twitter on Thursday. Though he did not clarify further, censor board sources said the process of getting CBFC certification is still underway. “The film has not been granted certification. It is still under process,” a source from the censor board said. The film, fronted by Vivek Oberoi and directed by “Mary Kom” maker Omung Kumar, was in the news with various political parties saying that releasing it less than a week before the general elections begin is a violation of the model code of conduct. Also Read – Tourists to be allowed in J&K from ThursdayThe Congress made a formal complaint to the Election Commission over the release of the film. Sources in the poll panel said on Wednesday that it is unlikely to prevent the release of the film and may leave it to the CBFC to take a call on the issue. Opposition parties, including the Congress, said the film would give undue advantage to the BJP in electioneering, and its release should be deferred till the elections are over. The project is also facing legal hurdles with a Congress leader filing a PIL in the Supreme Court, seeking a stay on its release. The court will hear the plea on Monday. The biopic ran into trouble over credits as well. Lyricists Javed Akhtar and Sameer said they were credited without contributing to the project. The producer, however, countered their claims, saying their old songs were reworked, so they gave credit where due.last_img read more

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Ohio States Big Ten Champion rowers speed past competition

The Ohio State rowing team secured the its third Big Ten Championship on Sunday in Indianapolis, earning the seniors their first championship rings. “It was our goal from the first practice this year,” senior MacKenzie Pecor said. The team previously won Big Ten Championships in 2002 and 2006, and Pecor said she’s excited about the opportunity to graduate with a championship. “It is honestly so awesome. Last year was the first class from OSU that graduated without ever winning a championship ring, and we did not want to be the second class to do the same thing,” Pecor said. “You row for four years; you want to win at least once.” Senior Jill Mohr agreed. “It was really a dream come true,” Mohr said. “It’s something that we’ve been looking forward to and something we’ve been working toward since I was a freshman.” Coach Andy Teitelbaum said he was proud to watch his players earn a championship for the school. “It’s just gratifying to see the kids hard work pay off with a championship,” Teitelbaum said. “It was really nice to see a group that lived their talk so well to be rewarded.” The team competed against all six other Big Ten schools that field a rowing team: Michigan, Michigan State, Iowa, Indiana, Wisconsin and Minnesota. The Big Ten title assures it a spot in the national championships scheduled for May 27–29 in Gold River, Calif. Pecor said she expects a change in training to prepare for the national championship but that she does not know how it will differ. “It’s probably going to be a little bit of different training, but we haven’t really discussed it,” she said. “We’re kind of still on a high from the Big Ten.” Teitelbaum, who has coached the Buckeyes since the program’s inception in 1995, said it’s important to continue to progress and stay in shape leading up to the national championships. This year will be the team’s 12th consecutive national championship appearance. Mohr said the team will have to put in a lot of work to succeed. “Our chances as a team are looking really strong going into the national championships,” Mohr said. “We have a lot to prove on the national level and that’s what we’ve been working toward.” read more

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Ohio State mens hockey coach Steve Rohlik reflects on 1st year

OSU hockey coach Steve Rohlik (back) talks to his team during a game against Michigan March 2 at Nationwide Arena. OSU lost, 4-3.Credit: Ben Jackson / For The LanternFor being such long endeavors, it’s odd that sports seasons are supposedly defined by their end results. It makes more sense to take a more holistic approach and look at the big picture — at the sum of all those little moments that go unnoticed.An event that was noticed was the 2014 Big Ten Hockey Tournament Championship in St. Paul, Minn. The first season of Big Ten hockey came down to one final game between Ohio State and Wisconsin, where the Buckeyes led 4-2 with less than seven minutes left March 22.The man behind OSU’s bench was Steve Rohlik. An associate head coach for three years with the Buckeyes, the 2013-14 season was Rohlik’s first in the top job. He had led his team through an 0-3 start and a goaltending reshuffle to bring the team within striking distance of its first NCAA Tournament appearance in five years.His seemingly calm demeanor didn’t reveal the tension of the encounter, nor his own personal details that made the situation more compelling — this was not only a game in his hometown, but it was also against his alma mater. The script almost writes itself.But, without warning, that script disappeared. The line between success and failure — one the Buckeyes had toed all season long in their 18-14-5 campaign — became clear. The Badgers scored twice in 28 seconds during the third period to tie the game, and less than eight minutes into the overtime period, Wisconsin was the Big Ten champion.“I couldn’t have asked much more from our guys. They laid it on the line,” Rohlik said last week. “Ultimately I think we were 6:52 short of doing something pretty darn special for this university, for the alumni here, and for this program.”That wasn’t the whole story, though. Instead, it was simply the end of the journey for a team and a coach that stressed the small things, and few could’ve imagined the Buckeyes would finish where they did after the upheaval of the previous spring.Before Rohlik stepped into his new role, Mark Osiecki was fired just over three weeks after the end of the 2012-13 season because of what athletic director Gene Smith called in a press release “a difference of opinion over the management of the program that could not be resolved.”It was Osiecki, Rohlik’s teammate at the University of Wisconsin, who brought him to Columbus as an associate head coach. Rohlik was named coach on an interim basis the day after Osiecki was let go, and then about a week later, was confirmed as the ninth head coach in program history.“I’m truly honored, humbled and very blessed,” Rohlik said at his introductory press conference April 24, 2013. “When I sat down with the administration, and they told me the support they had moving into the Big Ten, I knew this was the place I wanted to be.”Despite being an assistant coach for 16 years, Rohlik displayed leadership qualities at a young age. Captain at both Hill-Murray High School in St. Paul, Minn., and the University of Wisconsin, he had loads of experience in leading hockey players.“From a young age, I was a captain of every team I’ve ever been on. In high school, in every sport I was a captain, my buddies called me ‘the captain.’” Rohlik said. “It was just in my blood. I love to put my neck out there, I love to try to do things the right way, and I love to give it 110 percent and do whatever it takes to help the team win.”Just like leadership, hockey was also in Rohlik’s blood. Growing up in the “land of 10,000 lakes,” he said there was always a pond to skate on, and Rohlik described the sport as “a way of life.”The dream for most kids was to play in the Minnesota state championship game. Rohlik played in two.From there, he crossed the state line and attended the University of Wisconsin, captaining the Badgers in his junior and senior seasons, with his final campaign culminating in the 1990 NCAA Championship.“I might’ve been the guy with the ‘C’ on his sweater, but we had so many great leaders, and all the hard work kind of accumulated to our senior year,” Rohlik said. “To win the (Western Collegiate Hockey Association), to win the WCHA playoffs, and then to win the NCAA Tournament … you can’t write a book any better than that year.”Rohlik had a short stint as a professional before returning to his alma mater, Hill-Murray, as coach at the age of 23. Growing up, Rohlik’s father served the school in administrative position, so he said his dream was to play at Hill-Murray, making his appointment as coach even more meaningful.Five seasons in St. Paul were followed by Division I assistant coaching jobs at Nebraska-Omaha and Minnesota-Duluth. Then in 2010, Rohlik got the call from Osiecki, and in just three years he’d become the coach.“I think I’ve tried to take everything over my experiences as a player for so many years and as a coach for so many years. I just try to compile all those experiences,” Rohlik said. “Throughout all those years, you continue to ask yourself, ‘what would you do in that situation?’ I try to put myself in that spot, and ultimately when you get called upon (to be head coach), you try to surround yourself with good people.”One of those people is associate head coach Brett Larson, a man Rohlik got to know at Minnesota-Duluth, and who Rohlik brought to OSU upon his appointment last year. Larson said Rohlik’s passion coupled his with genuine nature makes him a natural fit for a coach.“The players can see how much he cares, how passionate he is. He wants to push everything to the next level,” Larson said. “It’s a great part of our culture, and you always say that the head coach leads the culture of a program. Being so passionate and so genuine are two things that make the players really want to play hard for him.”The switch in coaching might have been tricky, but junior forward Tanner Fritz — who played under Rohlik as an assistant for two years — said the familiarity was actually beneficial.“When he was the assistant coach, he was always the guy in the room after practice talking to the guys. He still does that — he’s a great player coach,” Fritz said. “He’s very involved in the team. I think he’s tight with every one of us. It’s good to have a coach that’s approachable and can talk to you outside of hockey.”Besides his management skills and personability, Rohlik wants to instill in his players that passion Larson and so many others see clearly in him. Judging by what players like Fritz have to say about it, he seems to have succeeded.“His passion for the game is — bar none — one of the best I’ve ever seen. The guy loves the game, he loves being at the rink,” Fritz said. “(The players) feed off that energy. We’re hard-working and we play with a lot of passion, and that comes from the coaching staff.”That might not have come through at first, however. Three consecutive losses to start the season, an injury to freshman goalie Matt Tomkins and another goalie, then-sophomore Collin Olson, leaving the program in November threatened to derail the entire season.But things changed with the addition of freshman goalie Christian Frey in net and the competitiveness of the Big Ten conference. Each game seemed to bring out the best in the Buckeyes as they finished fourth, behind three top-20 squads.Freshman forward Nick Schilkey, who was named to the Big Ten All-Freshman Team, said the coaching philosophy of Rohlik and his staff was a big factor in righting the ship.“He focuses on a lot of details. We focused all year on sticking together and sticking to the gameplan the coaches had set in place,” Schilkey said. “Over time, we grew into that gameplan and it showed during the second half of the year.”Those details came together in many instances, including the upset of then-No. 1 Minnesota in the Big Ten Tournament semifinal. Even if the season could be considered a success though, Rohlik knows there’s more to come from this team and this program.“Were we satisfied at the end? Absolutely not. Were we satisfied with where we were at in the league? Absolutely not,” Rohlik said. “There’s certainly always room for improvement, and we know we’ve got a long way to go.”And though he’s building a program, Rohlik sees his job as much more than that.He cites the examples of junior forward Ryan Dzingel and senior forward Alex Lippincott as proof of what the sport’s biggest impact can be. Dzingel just signed a professional contract with the Ottawa Senators of the NHL, while Lippincott recently got his first job as graduation approaches.“You see the power of what Ohio State can (do), be it moving on with the hockey or moving on because of the academic side of things,” Rohlik said. “I think that makes it pretty special for us to be involved with.”Now, with one season under his belt, Rohlik is aiming to make things even more special around the OSU hockey program.If he continues to get some of those little details right, it’d be hard to overestimate how far he can take it. read more

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Track and Field Multiple Buckeyes set personal records at Meyo Invitational

Ohio State’s Cole Gorski celebrates in mid-air at the Simmons-Harvey Quad in Ann Arbor, Michigan, on Jan. 21, 2018. Credit: Ethan Clewell | Lantern ReporterMembers of both Ohio State’s men’s and women’s track teams set individual records in South Bend, Indiana, during the Meyo Invitational. The meet, which took place Friday and Saturday, consisted of 37 teams, professional athletes and unattached competitors. Ohio State did not send its full team, opting not to send throwers, jumpers and some sprinters.Men’s RecapOhio State senior Cole Gorski re-set his personal high in pole vault, clearing 5.45 meters Friday night. Gorski’s previous record of 5.40 meters was set at the Buckeye Classic, the first meet of the season.  Gorski finished second behind Nate Richartz, a recent Notre Dame graduate, who jumped 5.55 meters. Richartz was an All-American in indoor track last year.Junior Coty Cobb finished third in the event behind Gorski and Richartz with a vault of 5.15 meters.Sophomore Alexander Lomong took first place in the men’s 800-meter run with a race of 1:50. Lomong also joined freshman Paul Bete, sophomore Ryan Harrington and junior Luke Landis on the first-place team that set a season-high in the men’s distance medley relay with a time of 9:50.Women’s recapOhio State freshman Anavia Battle finished first in the women’s 60-meter dash with a time of 7:46. She ran the 200-meter dash in 23:79, also taking first. Ohio State owned the 200-meter dash. Senior Maggie Barrie finished third (24.43), senior Beatrice Hannan came in fourth (24.49) and sophomore Taylor DeLoach placed sixth (24.71).Barrie also had a second-place finish in the 400-meter dash with a time of 53.51.Senior Chantel Ray placed second in the 60-meter hurdles (8.32).In the 3000-meter run, senior Christine Frederick smashed her prior personal record by 11 seconds with a third-place finish at 9:24.Senior Madison Roberts also set a personal record Saturday in indoor pole vault, reaching 4.02 meters. She finished third in the event.Next weekend the Buckeyes will split up. Part of the team will head to Nashville, Tennessee, for the Vanderbilt meet and other Buckeyes will travel to Iowa City, Iowa, for the Iowa State meet. read more

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KNWR Three Skilak Area Campgrounds Closed Following Bear Incident

first_imgFacebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Kenai National Wildlife Refuge has temporarily closed three area campgrounds to tent camping for public safety. For additional information, contact the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge office during regular business hours at (907) 262-7021. The three campgrounds are; Lower Ohmer, Upper Skilak, and Engineer Lake. Camping in hard- sided recreational vehicles is still permitted and campgrounds remain open to day-use. The closest alternative campgrounds for tent camping are Hidden Lake and Lower Skilak. The refuge on Saturday, July 21, received reports of a black bear damaging a camper’s tent in the Refuge’s Lower Ohmer Campground and scratching the single occupant.last_img

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