Varane Madrid must learn how to grind out results

first_imgDefender Raphael Varane admits Real Madrid must learn how to grind out wins if they want to have a good campaign.The Frenchman was speaking following a week experienced a week of mixed results after edging narrow victories over Huesca and Rayo Vallecano but suffered a massive home loss to CSKA Moscow in the Champions League.“To make this a good season we have to know how to suffer,” Varane told Football Espana via BeIn Sports after his side edged to a 1-0 victory over Rayo Vallecano.Sergio Ramos, Real MadridZidane reveals Sergio Ramos injury concern for Real Madrid Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Zinedine Zidane has put Sergio Ramos’ availability for Real Madrid’s trip to Sevilla next weekend in doubt after withdrawing him against Levante.“We had the opportunity to kill the game in the first half and we did not, but we worked well to win three important points.“We are going to the Club World Cup with a lot of enthusiasm, we are going to give our best.”Solari’s men will continue their quest for a fourth Champions League crown in a row when they confront Ajax in the last 16 next year.last_img read more

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Dark matter hiding in stars may cause observable oscillations

first_imgIn previous research on dark matter stars, it has often been assumed that stars accreting dark matter will continue to grow until they become so dense that they collapse into black holes. However, in the new study the physicists’ simulations showed that these stars actually appear to be stable and do not become black holes. Their stability arises from a self-regulatory mechanism called “gravitational cooling” in which the stars eject mass to slow down and stop their growth before they approach the critical Chandrasekhar limit, the point at which they collapse into black holes. As the scientists explain, the finding that dark matter stars are stable makes a surprising contribution to the research in this area.”Although it was known for some time that dark matter can be accreted by stars and form dark matter cores at their center, those studies were all phenomenological,” Brito said. “In addition, basically all these studies suggested that, if enough dark matter is accreted by a star, it will eventually trigger gravitational collapse and a black hole would form, eventually eating all the star.”We set about checking these claims, using a rigorous fully relativistic framework, i.e., solving the full Einstein’s equations. This is important if we want to understand how the dark matter core behaves for large densities. Well, it turns out that our results show that black hole formation can, in principle, be avoided by ejecting excessive mass: the dark matter core starts ‘repelling’ itself when it is too massive and compact, and is unable to grow past a certain threshold. This is, as far as we know, something that was ignored in previous works. “The above results are quite generic. Because any self-gravitating massive bosonic field can form compact structures, any such putative dark matter component would lead to the kind of effects we discuss in our paper. In this sense it proposes another way to search for these kinds of particles that can be complementary to observations coming from cosmology, for example. Given the lack of information that we have about the nature of dark matter, we think that it might be worth the effort to further develop this subject.”The scientists hope that the results here may help guide future research by suggesting where to look for dark matter and what methods to use to detect it.”We don’t know much about dark matter,” Brito said. “The only thing we do know is that all kinds of matter (be it regular matter or dark, invisible matter) fall in the same way in gravitational fields. This is Einstein’s equivalence principle in action. Thus, dark matter also falls in the usual way. It seems therefore appropriate to look for effects of dark matter in regions where gravity is strong, like neutron stars, black holes, etc. We are now trying to understand how dark matter behaves generically in regions of strong gravity.”At this precise moment, we are working on a long version of this letter. We want to understand in depth how the dark matter core grows for different kind of scenarios, and how viscosity in the star’s material affects the development of the accretion process.” (Phys.org)—Dark matter has never been seen directly, but scientists know that something massive is out there due to its gravitational effects on visible matter. One explanation for how such a large amount of mass appears to be right in front of our eyes yet completely invisible by conventional means is that the dark matter is hiding in the centers of stars. This sequence shows snapshots of a star’s density when two dark matter cores collide, where the x-axis is the plane of collision (only half the space is shown, but the remaining space can be obtained by symmetry). Although the final configuration is more compact and massive than the original, the star does not collapse into a black hole because it ejects some of its mass, slowing down its growth so that it remains stable. Credit: Brito, et al. ©2015 American Physical Society Dark matter guides growth of supermassive black holes In a new study, physicists have investigated the possibility that large amounts of hidden mass inside stars might be composed of extremely lightweight hypothetical particles called axions, which are a primary dark matter candidate. The scientists, Richard Brito at the University of Lisbon in Portugal; Vitor Cardoso at the University of Lisbon and the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada; and Hirotada Okawa at Kyoto University and Waseda University, both in Japan, have published their paper on dark matter in stars in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.”Our work studies how dark matter piles up inside stars if the dark matter is composed of massive bosonic particles (axions are an example of such particles),” Brito told Phys.org. “Our results show that dark matter accretion by stars does not lead to gravitational collapse; instead it may give rise to characteristic vibrations in stars.” The researchers theoretically showed that, if numerous axions were to pile up inside normal stars, then the dark matter core would oscillate. The oscillating core would in turn cause the star’s fluid to oscillate in tune with it at a specific frequency related to the star’s mass, or at multiples of this frequency. For a typical axion mass, the oscillating stars would emit microwave radiation and might have observable effects.”What oscillates is the fluid density and its pressure, but it’s probably correct as well to say that the entire star is oscillating,” Brito explained. “These are like sound waves propagating through the fluid, with a very specific frequency. Oscillations of this kind could, for example, lead to variations in the luminosity or in the temperature of the star, and these are quantities that we can measure directly.”In fact, there is already a whole branch of physics called asteroseismology, which studies the internal structure of stars by observing their oscillation modes. This is very much like the way scientists study the internal structure of the Earth by looking at seismic waves. It is possible that the oscillations of a star driven by a dark matter core could also be observed using similar methods. Given the very specific frequencies at which these stars would vibrate, this could be a smoking gun for the presence of dark matter. Asteroseismology is still in its infancy but it will, almost certainly, become a very precise way of observing stars in the future.” © 2015 Phys.org More information: Richard Brito, Vitor Cardoso, and Hirotada Okawa. “Accretion of dark matter by stars.” Physical Review Letters. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.111301, Also at arXiv:1508.04773 [gr-qc] Citation: Dark matter hiding in stars may cause observable oscillations (2015, September 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-09-dark-stars-oscillations.html Explore further Journal information: Physical Review Letters This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Homeless babies at risk of poor health

first_imgBabies born to homeless women are more likely to have poor health and development outcomes, says a study.The findings showed that babies who experienced both pre- and post-natal homelessness and those who experienced homelessness for longer than six months were at a highest risk of negative health outcomes. “These findings back up what we already knew about how the stress of homelessness affects children’s heath,” said Megan Sandel, paediatrician at Children’s HealthWatch, from the Boston Medical Centre (BMC) in the US. “But this helps us determine which children are at greatest risk, and makes the argument that policymakers and providers need to intervene to change the trajectory of a child’s development,” Sandel added.The study, published in Pediatrics, shows that the earlier and the longer a child experiences homelessness may have a larger cumulative toll of poor health and development outcomes.last_img read more

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4 Ways Technology Is Changing the Events Industry

first_img Register Now » The events industry is growing all around the world. According to Meeting Professionals International, events contribute $115 billion to the United States gross domestic product (GDP), with subsequent billions funneled to both state and federal tax revenue.The event industry isn’t just growing in the U.S., though — it’s also getting bigger in nations like the U.K., India and Japan.With that growth comes a need for technology that meets the consumers’ expectations and makes event production easier, and an influx of startups, entrepreneurs and venture capitalists are working together to develop solutions for the events industry.While this new technology makes a difference for eventgoers around the world, it is important to note how it changes the industry. Here are four of the most important updates:1. Tickets go mobileMobile is taking every industry by storm, and the events industry is no exception. The first wave of mobile innovation has come with ticket buying systems.“Ticketing is increasingly about establishing a higher touch point with your fans — it is about being made available to everyone, everywhere.” explains Neetu Bhatia, founder and CEO of Kyazoonga, a global online ticketing agency. Mobile ticketing also allows vendors to do a lot more. Bhatia explains, “Clients can access and manage the ticketing back-end in a much simpler fashion than the older terminal based systems – now anyone with a mobile smartphone can become a ticketing point-of-sale.”Consumers want have fully integrated mobile experiences during events, as well — research shows that usage rates for mobile apps at some events can be as high as 94 percent. As a result, venues, promoters and planners need to partner with providers who can take their experiences mobile. The good news is that customer adoption is usually quick: Research from Guidebook found that 88 percent of event professionals agreed the use of event apps improved attendee engagement.2. Cost reduction, revenue generation A study from Enterprise Event Marketing found that the use of event technology can create a 20 percent increase in event attendance while reducing related costs by up to 30 percent. Even so, numerous studies also indicate that one of the biggest reasons events professionals don’t integrate new technologies is due to costs.Companies and vendors will need to work harder to compete in an increasingly cost-sensitive industry.“We consider ourselves net revenue generators on a client’s profit and loss.” Bhatia shares, “We do that by using predictive analytics to enable and drive purchase decisions and algorithms to enhance the in-seat experience with real-time notifications to motivate future purchases.”In the past, providers have tried to be low-cost solutions, but the future of the industry may require them to be no-cost or provide additional value.3. Attendee dataBig data is king in most industries, but its potential remains unrealized in the events industry.Event tech expert Mike Piddock shares, “Event tech that gathers data, both during live events and presentations, and dipping into social media profiles to understand event communities, will be a must have rather than a nice to have.” Technologies like scannable QR codes, much like the ones used for online ticketing, can help event professionals collect data from attendees that are actively scanning different objects at a live event.Near Field Communication (NFC) and other location-based tracking used by companies like Google also serve to deepen consumer insights from live events. Google already tracks and publishes data about high-traffic times at entertainment locations, and can easily zero in on more specific data about what kind of searches originate from a live event. Similarly, NFC-enabled phones could help event organizers track where users most frequently purchased concessions or merchandise, giving rise to the potential of split testing live marketing tactics.4. Still-emerging trendsThough not yet mainstream, it’s important to note the trends that may have an impact on the industry in later years. The most likely development in the near term is cashless events. Mobile payments like Apple Pay and social payment platforms like Venmo are making the use of cash at events a thing of the past. This could significantly reduce costs for venues that have to deal with everything that comes along with cash management.Another shift may come in the use of VR technology. Virtual attendance has the potential to provide low-cost options for people who otherwise wouldn’t be willing to spend money on tickets. Additionally, those people could have a view from the best seats in the house without damaging ticket sales in those areas.The industry is rapidly investing in new technologies, but factors like cost and concerns surrounding the way tech integration may impact event experience continue to prevent some professionals from trying new solutions.Bhatia shared, “The shift to mobile, emphasis on complete experiences over transactions, and in-venue cloud-based systems rather than terminal driven access are just some of the key trends that will shape the events industry.”For businesses working to gain bids with major events providers, the focus should remain on being a cost-effective partner while providing solutions that increase attendee engagement.For event organizers, the key will be assessing what technologies have the best return on investment, both in revenue generation and attendee satisfaction. Those that capitalize on the right technologies stand to gain a significant competitive advantage in the evolving event landscape. 5 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. March 24, 2017last_img read more

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