Houston Firefighters Union President to Debate Mayor Turner on Pay Parity

first_img Share @FirefightersHOU has withdrawn from the scheduled debate on Proposition B after the Harris County Democratic Party failed to set ground rules that would have checked Mayor Sylvester Turner’s influence over the event. Please see attached news release. pic.twitter.com/FJKbynI4Gy— Houston Firefighters (@FirefightersHOU) October 3, 2018 Patrick M. ‘Marty’ Lancton, president of the Houston Professional Fire Fighters Association.The Houston Professional Fire Fighters Association (HPFFA) announced Wednesday afternoon it has agreed to participate in a debate with Mayor Sylvester Turner about pay parity between the local police and fire departments.On Wednesday morning, the HPFFA had announced that its president, Patrick M. ‘Marty’ Lancton, would not participate in the debate, which is scheduled for Saturday, due to disagreements with the Harris County Democratic Party (HCDP) which is organizing the event.The HPFFA said in a statement obtained by News 88.7 that “the Harris County Democratic Party failed to set ground rules that would have checked Mayor Sylvester Turner’s influence over the event.”center_img The statement detailed that the Harris County Democratic Party “rejected a HPFFA request to directly address precinct chairs so they could vote on whether the county Democratic Party should support firefighters and Proposition B.”However, a statement sent around 4:30 p.m. announced that “after working through a variety of miscommunications” the HPFFA had agreed to take part in the debate about Proposition B.Lancton thanked the HCDP for “further clarifying the ground rules of the Prop B debate.” “Fairness of the debate and the inclusion of the precinct chairs in this process are priorities for us. The precinct chairs deserve to be as involved as possible in the debate,” the HPFFA president added.The debate will take place this Saturday, October 6, from 10 to 11 a.m. and will be live-streamed by the HCDP.last_img read more

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AFRO Exclusive with Taraji P Henson

first_imgBy Micha Green, AFRO Washington, D.C. Editor, mgreen@afro.comIn the Black community, mental health is often treated as the elephant in the room that no one really wants to talk about.Between “praying the pain away,” worrying about “airing dirty laundry,” and thinking therapy is for “privileged people,” many in communities of color keep mental and emotional health challenges inside, as opposed to seeking help for their illnesses. Not getting professional help for mental health issues can lead to further physical health issues including high blood pressure, muscle pain, addiction and death.Taraji P. Henson sat down with AFRO Washington, D.C. Editor to discuss her organization, the Boris Lawrence Henson Foundation, and her conference, “Can We Talk?,” which took place in Washington, D.C. June 7-9. (Photo by Jabray Franklin AFRO Intern)For these reasons actress and advocate Taraji P. Henson, hopes to break the stigma and silence around mental health with her organization, the Boris Lawrence Henson Foundation, and her conference, “Can We Talk?,” which took place June 7-9 in her hometown, Washington, D.C.In an exclusive AFRO interview, Henson took some time out from the conference to share the importance of her foundation, and why Black people need to talk about mental health.“Because it’s taboo in many ways.  We don’t really talk about it,” Henson told the AFRO.The Boris Lawrence Henson Foundation is named after the actress’ father, who was instrumental in influencing her to go after her artistic endeavors.“My dad was very paramount about me becoming an actress. He sewed great seeds into me.  He told me I was going to be one of the greatest actresses alive when I was little. He always spoke great things into me, so I had no choice but to dream big because those are the seeds he planted,” she said.Notwithstanding her personal career, the D.M.V. native also shared that she named the foundation in honor of her father, after realizing, once he passed, the importance he had in her life by actually talking about mental health.“He was an open book- open road map to his life… He told his truth, he walked in his truth no matter what, and that’s a bold place to live.  A lot of us are really afraid to live in our truth. And that’s what he taught me,” she said. “He was very open and honest about his mental issues.  You never go to war and come back the same. So, I just felt like this was a way to honor his legacy and the things he instilled in me,” the actress and mental health advocate added.Henson noted the domino effect that has taken place in the Black community by not talking about mental health.“That’s why there’s a shortage of African Americans in the field of  mental health, because we don’t talk about it at home. Our children don’t even know, this is a field they can even flourish in.  They’ll say, ‘I want to be a doctor, I want to be a dentist,’ no one ever says, ‘I want to be a psychiatrist, I want to be psychologist, I want to be a therapist, a mental health therapist,’” she told the AFRO. “I think once we have open dialogue about it, people will be more comfortable about being vulnerable.”In opening up about mental health, Henson feels, true change can happen.“We’ve always been taught to keep our problems close to us, but that’s not how you change lives.  You change lives by telling your story, telling your truth, however ugly it may be. No one wants to hear how easy you had it, you can’t change a life like that,” Henson told the AFRO. While the conference is now over, there are still ways to get involved with the foundation, by visiting the website http://www.borislhensonfoundation.org.For those interested in donating to the Boris Lawrence Henson Foundation, the actress has specific instructions. “If you feel like you want to help in any way- any donation is a good donation- you can text, ‘Can We Talk’ to 41444.”last_img read more

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