Philyaw helps Norco girls pull away in fourth quarter

first_imgSAN DIEGO – With the game on the line in the fourth quarter, Norco knew where to turn. And Kasey Philyaw delivered. Philyaw scored 10 of her 13 points during a four-minute stretch in the fourth quarter – including six in a row after San Diego Mt. Carmel had tied the game – as Norco pulled away for a 52-43 victory in a CIFDivision II first-round state playoff game. “Kasey’s been big for us all year in the fourth quarter,” Norco coach Rick Thompson said. “She struggles through three. The thing for us as coaches is to continue to have faith in her.” That faith was rewarded as Philyaw came through while Brittani Philbrook (four points, seven assists, five blocks and three steals) was plagued by foul trouble and Ciera Windham (14 points, nine rebounds, four steals and two blocks) was neutralized by the big front line of Mt. Carmel (23-8). Philbrook fouled out with 1:52 to play. “I know the team needs the spark and I take it upon myself to be that for the team,” Philyaw said. Norco’s Tyler Howard scored a game-high 16 points, shooting 7-of-15 from the floor. With the victory, the third-seeded Cougars (28-3) advance to meet Ayala on Saturday. The winner of that game plays in the Southern California Regional championship game at 2 p.m. March 17 at UCLA’s Pauley Pavilion. After Mt. Carmel, the CIF-San Diego Section Division II champion and No. 6 seed in the Southern California Regional, rallied from a 13-point second-quarter deficit to tied the game at 39-39 in the fourth quarter, Philyaw took charge. She nailed a 3-pointer from deep in the left corner, then came back to hit a running bank shot from the left side, was fouled, and knocked down the free throw to put the Cougars up 45-39. center_img Mt. Carmel outrebounded Norco 50-32 largely because of the play of Cara and Jenna Breite, a pair of 6-footers. Cara finished with 11 points and 11 rebounds. Jenna had four points and 11 rebounds. But Norco’s defense, which has allowed more than 60 points just once in six postseason games, was again solid. The Cougars forced 27 turnovers, while committing just 11, and held the Sun Devils to 35 percent shooting from the floor (17-of-48). “We just couldn’t convert late when we should have,” said Mt. Carmel coach Robin Blalock, who has led Mt. Carmel to four section championships in the last eight seasons. “They knocked down some key shots and we threw the ball away at critical points.” DIVISION V Mesa Grande 44, Escondido Calvin Christian 42 Carla Bartlett had 20 points and seven assists and Tamara Bowles made a tie-breaking 3-pointer with less than 40 seconds left to lead the Cardinals (23-6) to the win over the San Diego Section champions. After Bowles’ shot, Bartlett came up with a key rebound and was fouled. She made one of two free throws to put the Cardinals up 44-40 with nine seconds left. Calvin Christian made a layup and Mesa Grande was able to kill the time remaining on the clock. Mesa Grande, the third seed, will play at Mission Prep, the second seed, which defeated Rio Hondo Prep 54-33. Megan Williams added eight points and eight rebounds for the Cardinals. BOYS DIVISION IV Ontario Christian 69, Bakersfield Garces 68 Senior forward Justus Jones scored a layup on an assist from junior guard Bobby Nigg with 14 seconds left and the visiting Knights held on in their CIF-State Division IV first-round boys basketball game. “It’s real exciting for us,” Knights coach Scott Brummel said. “The gym was packed. It was one of those games where it was a game of runs. We had the lead at nine in the third quarter, and they came back in the fourth quarter to lead by three and four points.” After Jones’ basket, the six-seeded Knights switched to a man-to-man defense in order to stop Garces’ Stephon Carter, who finished with 42 points, including 15 in the final quarter. Garces, a third seed, drove to the basket and missed. The ball was tipped back toward Carter, but the Knights tied him up as time expired. “I like the fact that we’ve played such good defense,” Brummel said. “We played a 3-2 zone (tonight) and it’s been pretty effective all year. They figured it out and with Carter in the post, they did a good job.” Jones finished with 26 points and 21 rebounds, while Nigg scored 10 points. Ontario Christian (25-5) will play at San Diego Horizon at 7p.m. Saturday. Horizon defeated Desert of Edwards AFB 67-26. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Man arrested after several cars damaged in late night incident in Dunfanaghy

first_imgA man has been arrested after he crashed into at least three parked cars in Dunfanaghy last night (Sun). The incident occurred on Main Street, Dunfanaghy close to Arnold’s Hotel between 11:30pm and 12am on Sunday.Following the incident, in which several cars were severely damaged, the man was stopped by Gardaí who had been called to the scene.  He is due to appear before Letterkenny District Court today (Mon).It is understood that no one was hurt in the late-night incident. We’ll bring you more as we get it…  Man arrested after several cars damaged in late night incident in Dunfanaghy was last modified: October 2nd, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Live updates: Warriors vs. Pacers, Thursday at 7:30 p.m.

first_imgGet live news and analysis Thursday at 7:30 p.m. when the Warriors open a three-game homestand by hosting the tough-minded Indiana Pacers.The Warriors (48-22) will have their regular starting lineup intact as center DeMarcus Cousins makes his return after sitting out the past two games with an ankle injury. Warriors fans will also welcome back Andrew Bogut, who makes his first appearance at Oracle since signing with the team.Golden State is coming off a 3-1 road trip that culminated …last_img

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Watchdog Group EFF Sues Government Regarding Social Media Surveillance Tactics

first_imgConsumer watchdog group, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, has initiated a lawsuit against multiple U.S. government agencies for failing to disclose their policies regarding the use of social media for surveillance. According to the filing, the government has been making use of social media sites like Facebook, MySpace, YouTube and Twitter to aid in various investigations where the alleged crimes range from the relatively minor infringement of underage drinking, to more serious endeavors, such as the coordination of protesters during the G-20 summit. However, when requests were made under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) for details about governmental policies, several agencies failed to respond with information regarding what data is collected, under what circumstances and who has access to it.About the SuitThe EFF is working with the Samuelson Law, Technology, and Public Policy Clinic at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law on this lawsuit. The clinic filed the original FOIA requests on EFF’s behalf and later filed the suit when government agencies refused to respond. Named in suit are the Department of Defense, the Central Intelligence Agency, the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of the Treasury, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, and the Department of Justice, which includes the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Drug Enforcement Agency, and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives, among others. The filing mentions several recent media articles where criminals have been apprehended due to government surveillance of social networking sites, including the case of Maxi Sopo, whose Facebook status updates led to his arrest on bank fraud charges. Another example involved programmer Aaron Swartz, who helped an open-government activist with the collection of millions of public and free court records. His activities led to a full-scale FBI investigation, as detailed here in this Wired article. Twitter’s name also came up when, as mentioned above, the service was used to notify G-20 summit protesters of police movements. Although this suit may lead some to believe the EFF is against the practice of utilizing social networking sites for investigative purposes, that is not the case. The filing notes that government use is “often for laudable reasons” – they just want the scope clarified so as to prevent abuse. Social Media Investigations are the New WiretapNo longer solely used by tech-savvy individuals, social networks have seen explosive growth over recent years. Sites which at one time catered only to the young – such as Facebook which began as college-only network – now include demographic groups that range from pre-teens all the way up to grandparents. As more mainstream users join sites such as these, there is a growing need for privacy awareness. Specifically, internet users have the right to know who can access their data as well as when and how it can be used. Initiatives like Facebook’s recent privacy updates are intended to help users maintain some control over that data, but that may not be enough. As graduate student Christopher Soghoian recently revealed on his blog, government agencies routinely request information from the operators of social networks when investigating criminal activities in order to access data users have hidden from public view. In fact, most companies even have documented policies regarding the procedures for requesting this data. For example, Facebook’s Subpoena and Search Warrant Guide is here, and MySpace’s Law Enforcement Guide is here. In this new technological age we live in, using social media to gather data and track criminals is commonplace. It’s the new wiretap. And while groups like EFF acknowledge that social network surveillance is often used for commendable purposes, people deserve to know what their rights are in this area. Hopefully, this suit will shed some light on that. A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit Tags:#news#NYT#social networks#web Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videoscenter_img Related Posts Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification sarah perezlast_img read more

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The Facebook Privacy Debate: What You Need to Know

first_imgA Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit Facebook changed the world by helping 350 million people publish their thoughts, feelings, comments, photos, videos and shared links much more easily than ever before. It’s the King of social networking.The network grew with a big promise of privacy at the center of what it offered: your information was by default visible only to people you approved as friends. In December that changed, in a fundamental way. We offer below a summary of the changes that were made and key highlights from the debate that’s raging around the world about privacy, public information and Facebook. Given the role that Facebook plays in so many of our lives, this is high-stakes stuff.What changed in December: Facebook users are no longer allowed to restrict access to their profile photos and the list of pages they have subscribed to updates from. The list of any Facebook user’s friends were made irrevocably public but after a very negative reaction from users, users were given a way to hide those lists from human view and leave them visible only to machine access. User updates (“What’s on your mind?”), shared photos, videos and links used to be private (visible only to approved friends) by default. If you’d never tweaked your privacy settings, then in December they were shifted by default to public (visible to the entire web) unless you decided when prompted to switch them back to private.Those aren’t simple changes to understand and there has been a lot of confusion about them. Many people do not like the way this is going. Here are some of the highlights of that debate.Facebook’s Arguments in Favor of a Shift Towards Public InformationIn July we asked Facebook executives point-blank on a press call about some of the initial changes in privacy settings: are you pushing people towards sharing more information publicly on the site. Two out of three of those we asked said yes, they were. Why? The answers have been inconsistent and not very compelling.Facebook Product Manager Leah Pearlman told us that making more user data publicly visible would help users identify which people were their friends when search results showed multiple people with the same name. Facebook Director of Communications Brandee Barker told us that more public information would help users connect with new people who share common interests. Chief Privacy Officer Chris Kelly told us the July changes weren’t about decreased privacy, but about increased control for users over their privacy.When December’s changes went down, we had a long conversation with Barry Schnitt, Director of Corporate Communications and Public Policy at Facebook. Schnitt told us that the shift towards more public information was big; just like “it was a big change in 2006 when Facebook became more than just people from colleges.” “Facebook is changing,” he said, “and so is the world changing and we are going to innovate to meet user requests.” Schnitt said it was clear the world was changing away from a focus on privacy and cited as evidence the rise in blogging, Twitter and MySpace, comments posted on newspaper websites and the popularity of Reality TV. Schnitt also acknowledged that page views and advertising were part of the motivation.Then in January Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg said publicly that if he were to create Facebook today, the privacy settings would have been from the start just what they are today. He said that notions of privacy are evolving and that the company changed its policies to reflect that. He cited the rise of blogging as his evidence of that change.Finally, the company has said for some time that more public information will lead to greater familiarity, understanding and empathy between people: that a change towards a public Facebook is good for world peace. This actually might be the most compelling argument of all and it’s not that compelling because of the matter of user trust.The Arguments Against Facebook’s ChangeTwo years ago Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg told us that Facebook users couldn’t be permitted to take their data from Facebook to other sites they wanted to use it on because privacy control “is the vector around which Facebook operates.” The company has changed its stance regarding privacy dramatically since then.Many people believe that Facebook is getting ready to file for an Initial Public Offering – to start selling stock in the company to the public. It’s widely suspected that this shift toward more public information is intended to increase website traffic and advertising: the more pages you can look at, unhindered by privacy settings, the more ads Facebook will be able to show you. The more ads Facebook can show you, the more its stock will be worth in the IPO.We’ve argued that the ways Facebook is justifying these shifts just aren’t believable. Last week we made these three arguments:Even if society is changing to move away from privacy – that doesn’t justify taking away the option to keep many things private. As Microsoft researcher danah boyd wrote this weekend: People still care about privacy because they care about control. Sure, many teens repeatedly tell me ‘public by default, private when necessary’ but this doesn’t suggest that privacy is declining; it suggests that publicity has value and, more importantly, that folks are very conscious about when something is private and want it to remain so. When the default is private, you have to think about making something public. When the default is public, you become very aware of privacy. And thus, I would suspect, people are more conscious of privacy now than ever.As Nick O’Neill wrote on his own blog AllFacebook: When Facebook decided that they would start making these decisions on behalf of users, they crossed the line. Facebook doesn’t need to update their system to ‘reflect what the current social norms are’. Instead, Facebook should give users complete control of their privacy and as a result, user settings in aggregate will effectively ‘reflect what the current social norms are’. Simplifying a system which gives users complete control of their privacy isn’t easy but the value of such a system is priceless and for Facebook it’s necessary.Privacy isn’t just about keeping things secret, it’s about respecting the context of communication and not pushing peoples’ communication out of the context it was intended for. Thus, the fact that “nothing is secret on the internet” is beside the point. As University of Massachusetts-Amherst Legal Studies student Chris Peterson writes in a research paper Saving Face: The Privacy Architecture of Facebook (PDF), people today feel their privacy has been violated if what they say to one group of people gets shared with another group in different circumstances. By pushing personal information out of the restricted access of “friends only” – that’s what Facebook is doing.There are many people who need to maintain control over their personal information, to restrict access to it to trusted friends, as a matter of personal safety. As online identity technical consultant Kaliya Hamlin wrote here last month, Facebook’s push away from privacy represents a violation of its contract with users. Scientists have been able to determine peoples’ sexual preferences by analyzing their friends lists. People with religious or political preferences that are unpopular where they live or work and people who are escaping abusive relationships used to be able to keep their private information (like interests in the form of Fan pages) between trusted friends on Facebook but can no longer.Here’s how danah boyd explained a similar argument:Power is critical in thinking through these issues. The privileged folks don’t have to worry so much about people who hold power over them observing them online. That’s the very definition of privilege. But most everyone else does. And forcing people into the public eye doesn’t dismantle the structures of privilege, the structures of power. What pisses me off is that it reinforces them. The privileged get more privileged, gaining from being exposed. And those struggling to keep their lives together are forced to create walls that are constantly torn down around them. The teacher, the abused woman, the poor kid living in the ghetto and trying to get out. How do we take them into consideration when we build systems that expose people?…People care deeply about privacy, especially those who are most at risk of the consequences of losing it. Let us not forget about them. It kills me when the bottom line justifies social oppression. Is that really what the social media industry is about?Finally, thinker and author Nick Carr weighed in this weekend as well with a withering article titled “Other Peoples’ Privacy.” He discussed both Facebook’s shift away from privacy and Google CEO Eric Schmidt’s recent statement that “If you have something that you don’t want anyone to know, maybe you shouldn’t be doing it in the first place.”Carr drives home the significance of these anti-privacy moves and statements by calling them a threat to human liberty. Reading through these wealthy, powerful people’s glib statements on privacy, one begins to suspect that what they’re really talking about is other people’s privacy, not their own. If you exist within a personal Green Zone of private jets, fenced off hideaways, and firewalls maintained by the country’s best law firms and PR agencies, it’s hardly a surprise that you’d eventually come to see privacy more as a privilege than a right. And if your company happens to make its money by mining personal data, well, that’s all the more reason to convince yourself that other people’s privacy may not be so important.There’s a deeper danger here. The continuing denigration of privacy may begin to warp our understanding of what “privacy” really means. As Bruce Schneier has written, privacy is not just a screen we hide behind when we do something naughty or embarrassing; privacy is ‘intrinsic to the concept of liberty’:For if we are observed in all matters, we are constantly under threat of correction, judgment, criticism, even plagiarism of our own uniqueness. We become children, fettered under watchful eyes, constantly fearful that – either now or in the uncertain future – patterns we leave behind will be brought back to implicate us, by whatever authority has now become focused upon our once-private and innocent acts. We lose our individuality, because everything we do is observable and recordable.Privacy is not only essential to life and liberty; it’s essential to the pursuit of happiness, in the broadest and deepest sense of that phrase. It’s essential, as Schneier implies, to the development of individuality, of unique personality. We human beings are not just social creatures; we’re also private creatures. What we don’t share is as important as what we do share. The way that we choose to define the boundary between our public self and our private self will vary greatly from person to person, which is exactly why it’s so important to be ever vigilant in defending everyone’s ability and power to set that boundary as he or she sees fit. Today, online services and databases play increasingly important roles in our public and our private lives – and in the way we choose to distinguish between them. Many of those services and databases are under corporate control, operated for profit by companies like Google and Facebook. If those companies can’t be trusted to respect and defend the privacy rights of their users, they should be spurned.Privacy is the skin of the self. Strip it away, and in no time desiccation sets in.Desiccation means to dry something out by removing the water from it; Carr argues that the removal of privacy from our lives would suck dry our liberty, our individuality.Those are the arguments being made. We don’t expect this debate to die down anytime soon. Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Related Posts center_img Tags:#Analysis#NYT#social networks#web marshall kirkpatrick The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videoslast_img read more

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Tips for Avid Media Composer Video Editors

first_imgWe took to Twitter to find the best tips and tricks for Avid Media Composer video editors.If you’re just starting out editing in Avid Media Composer this roundup of useful keyboard shortcuts, workflow tricks and timesaving tips should help you get to work quicker and more efficiently.I previously blogged a roundup of tips for Avid editors sourced from Twitter here. As it was a popular post I thought I’d do the same thing again. There are some really great tips from the Twitter post production community lately! tip to documentary producers: after an interview have your subject say the words “and” “but” & “so” 5 times each. your editor will love you— Christopher Francis (@thefrance) October 15, 2013last_img

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10 months agoMan Utd U18 coach Ryan: We’ll protect Greenwood from hype

first_imgMan Utd U18 coach Ryan: We’ll protect Greenwood from hypeby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United U18 coach Neil Ryan says they’re determined to protect Mason Greenwood from the hype around him.Greenwood, 17, hit a matchwinning hat-trick as United inflicted a first Youth Cup defeat on Chelsea since the 2013 final in an enthralling 4-3 victory at Leigh Sports Village on Monday night.”We’re a good club for making sure to fight all that hype down,” Ryan told the Manchester Evening News. “Because he’s still got a long way to go, let’s get it right.”He’s doing very, very well this year. He was on the bench in the week against Valencia, which was a great experience for him. We’ve got great staff looking after him on and off the pitch and ourselves, as coaching staff, it’s our jobs to make sure we get him to the next level. It’s going to be a challenge for him, but a great challenge.”He’s had a fantastic four or five months so far and we’ve got to keep working with him.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Andy Roddick Brooklyn Decker Attend Think It Up Live Pitch Competition For

first_imgThink It Up, the new initiative from the Entertainment Industry Foundation (EIF), joined Brooklyn Decker, Andy Roddick, Austin officials including Independent School District Superintendent Dr. Paul Cruz, and hundreds of local students and teachers on March 10th during SXSWedu for the second in a national series of Think It Up Live pitch competitions.Andy Roddick and Brooklyn Decker at EIF’s Think It Up Live EventCredit/Copyright: Rick Kern, 2016 Getty ImagesAlongside a panel and booth activation on-site at SXSWedu, the live pitch event was designed to empower students, celebrate teachers and build optimism about what’s possible in America’s classrooms. The event drew students and teachers from 24 traditional district and public charter schools in Austin.Think It Up Live Brings Spirit of SXSW to Local Austin Students and Teachers
At Think It Up Live, student-teacher teams across Austin came together to pitch VIP judges and Austin-based husband/wife couple Andy Roddick and Brooklyn Decker on their innovative learning ideas. Roddick, the founder of the Andy Roddick Foundation and retired tennis star, and well-known “Grace and Frankie” actress Decker, listened as students put their best ideas forward at this science fair-meets “shark tank”-type event designed to promote empowered, engaged learning.The winning team was selected from a group of 50 teams and came from Ann Richards School for Young Women Leaders, and received $1,000 to fund their project, which created a produce spoilage tracker to reduce food waste. All participating teams received $100 in funding credits to kick-start their projects.All funding credits are applied once teachers will post projects at ThinkItUp.org – a first-of-its-kind platform available to all public school students and educators (grades 7-12) in partnership with DonorsChoose.org, the popular teacher crowd-funding charity. To help bring to life more student-powered, teacher-led projects, Think It Up covers half each of each proposals total cost by EIF’s supporters, including Ashoka’s Start Empathy initiative, ExxonMobil and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, with the rest raised through crowd-funding.The event follows the success of EIF’s inaugural Think It Up telecast that aired in September, and first Think It Up Live event in Denver held in December.Think it Up Debuts at SXSWedu
To spread awareness among education innovators, Think It Up participated in its first panel and expo at Austin’s SXSWedu conference. The “Think Rethink: Crowdsourcing Innovation Panel” on March 8th featured Creative Artists Agency Chief Innovation Officer Michelle Kydd Lee as moderator of a discussion featuring Jennifer Golub from MAL/FOR GOOD and Hillary Moglen from XQ: The Super School and Mike Marriner for Road Trip Nation. The panel discussed the power of crowdsourcing to generate ideas, including how each organization defines the crowd and why is it important to bring broader, mainstream cultural attention to education in the United States.At the SXSWedu convention center, the Think It Up booth brought the pitch competition to the expo, bringing to life the initiative’s excitement for learning by inviting visitors to submit an idea to bring their learning in the classroom to life.last_img read more

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These Kings Are Better Than Gretzkys Kings

For NHL fans of a certain age,1Full disclosure: I am of this demographic, albeit one of the younger members. the definitive Los Angeles Kings team is Wayne Gretzky’s Los Angeles Kings team. The franchise existed for 21 seasons before Gretzky arrived in Los Angeles in 1988, but the banality that he single-handedly made hockey relevant in LA is largely true. Kings attendance soared with No. 99 in the fold,2Increasing 27 percent in Gretzky’s first season with LA and another 11 percent in his second, per Rodney Fort’s data. the team’s value increased sharply during his tenure there,3The Kings ranked as the NHL’s third-most valuable team in 1994, according to contemporary estimates by Financial World magazine. In 1995, the team sold for a price ($113 million) nearly three times its value in 1988, when Bruce McNall bought 51 percent of the team for $20 million. and Gretzky instantly transformed the on-ice product into a legitimate contender by powering one of the best offenses in the game. Behind a 40-point postseason by Gretzky, the Kings reached their apex in 1993 — losing in five games but earning what was, at the time, the franchise’s lone Stanley Cup Final berth. For years, the Gretzky era easily represented the high-water mark of hockey’s four-decade experiment in Southern California.Not anymore. The Kings now are back in the finals for the second time in three years, and are looking for another Stanley Cup victory to follow the one they won in 2012. But this team isn’t Gretzky’s. It’s constructed differently and it plays a different game. And it might be better for it.If you’re looking for an NHL “Moneyball,” the modern Kings may be as close as any team to embodying the ethos of hockey’s sabermetric revolution. As FiveThirtyEight contributor Eric Tulsky has noted before, the current Kings pursue a strategy of constant control of the puck. With a host of possession superstars, the Kings have led the NHL in close-score4To filter out the influence of score effects. Fenwick percentage — a proxy for time of possession that measures a team’s share of all unblocked shots directed at either net during its games — for two years running, and the year before that they dominated the metric down the stretch after swapping defenseman Jack Johnson5A particularly poor Fenwick player, it should be noted. for center Jeff Carter at the trade deadline.No opposing team can score (or even shoot) when it doesn’t have the puck. During the regular season, LA allowed the league’s third-lowest rate of unblocked shots per minute of 5-on-5 play, and its second-lowest rate of total shots allowed per game. Along with decent goaltending from Jonathan Quick, that’s how the Kings helped clinch the William Jennings Trophy, given to the goaltenders on the team that allows the fewest goals all season. Maximizing possession is a hockey hack that helps at both ends of the rink.But all that possession hasn’t guaranteed the modern-day Kings a bushel of goals. The Kings spent most of the 2013-14 regular season struggling to light the lamp, despite firing the league’s second-highest rate of unblocked shots at the opposing net.6Per 60 minutes of 5-on-5 play. Their 5-on-5 shooting percentage with the score close, which had been average in 2012-13, slumped to third worst in the NHL this season. Still, LA kept emphasizing possession and putting the puck on net, seeming to trust that shooting percentages tend to regress heavily to the mean.And the Kings rediscovered their scoring touch at just the right time. During the playoffs, they’ve scored on a substantially higher proportion of shots than they did during the regular season. It doesn’t hurt that they also acquired right wing Marian Gaborik — whose career shooting percentage ranks among the best of any active player’s — at the trade deadline. But the biggest reason for the Kings’ offensive resurgence is that they rode out their poor shooting luck and continued to focus on dominating the puck, the way statheads have been calling for teams to do for years.The Kings squad that Gretzky tearfully joined on Aug. 9, 1988, played a very different kind of hockey.We don’t know for sure because play-by-play records from that era are not available, but it’s unlikely that Gretzky’s Kings dominated possession of the puck. According to estimates of close-score Fenwick percentage for older seasons, Los Angeles ranked among the top half of teams in possession rate just once (1990-91) in the eight seasons the Great One wore silver and black. Most of the time, they were actually somewhat bad at keeping control of the puck, ranking 18th out of 26 teams in estimated close-score Fenwick percentage during Gretzky’s tenure.Instead, they lived off a suspiciously high shooting percentage that modern analysts might decry as luck. During Gretzky’s first three seasons as a King, LA finished no worse than second in goals per shot. But Gretzky’s playmaking wizardry was probably a very real effect. Over that span, he paced the league in assists by a wide margin,7He notched 107 more helpers than No. 2 Adam Oates. You could have finished 70th in assists over the same period with the leftovers Gretzky didn’t need to pass Oates. and his teammates shot 9.1 percent better in those seasons than they would over the rest of their careers.The defense couldn’t measure up to the offense, though. Those Kings allowed the league’s second-highest number of shots8Only the miserable San Jose Sharks, in their second year of existence, played softer D. and its fourth-highest number of goals.Gretzky’s squad didn’t have a deep roster, either. According to Tom Awad’s catch-all summary stat Goals Versus Threshold (like Value Over Replacement Player for hockey), the 1992-93 Kings were a notably top-heavy team. They were led by stars such as Luc Robitaille and Jari Kurri. (Not to mention Gretzky, who recovered from an injury in time to post 65 points in 45 games.) But they also lost 17.8 goals because sub-replacement-level talent was on the ice, one of the largest totals in recent memory by a team that won more than half its games.The current iteration of the Kings has superior depth, and nary a Gretzky type to be found. Since LA’s top scorer Anže Kopitar debuted with the club in 2006-07, his best offensive season was 86 adjusted points. Gretzky’s worst full-season mark as a King by far was 83 adjusted points9Adjusted points are, well, adjusted — meaning they remove the influence of scoring environment — so Gretzky doesn’t get an unfair advantage for playing in a more high-flying era. in 1994-95 — and he cracked the century mark in five of his six full seasons in Los Angeles. Today’s Kings rely less on a single superstar to carry the bulk of the offensive workload.Superior depth and puck possession don’t automatically equal a better hockey team, though they often do. The proof is in the results for the current Kings, who over the last three seasons are already twice as close to a quantifiable dynasty as the franchise was during Gretzky’s entire stay in Southern California.10200.0 dynasty points compared to 97.6. If advancing deep into the postseason is the standard for success, today’s Kings beat No. 99’s in a landslide.Gretzky himself has said that the present-day Kings are impressive. Of the Cup-winning 2012 team, the Great One said, “They’re a much better team than we were in ’93.”He’s right. Gretzky’s team was an exciting offensive squad, and one of the last successful relics of the high-octane playing style that had ruled the game in the 1980s. But today’s Los Angeles Kings are exemplars of the modern game. They know that if you always have the puck on your stick, you can’t lose. read more

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Wrestling looking to take down the team up north

Any Buckeye will tell you there’s not much that tops the feeling of defeating “that team up north.” The Ohio State wrestling team is no exception. “It’s Ohio State — Michigan. We don’t like each other,” senior captain Colt Sponseller said. “That’s evident when we wrestle each other.” The misconception that the rivalry is limited to football is something the team looks to dispel. “A lot of people think it’s just football, but it’s all sports,” Sponseller said. “It’s a real big deal.” The Buckeyes have beaten Michigan the past three years, and look to extend that to four when they host the Wolverines at 7 p.m. Friday. “We’ve won the last three; we want to continue to win against Michigan,” coach Tom Ryan said. “Our group understands the importance of the rivalry.” The competition brings a different approach to the week preceding it. Ryan said he showed his team a video of the football rivalry, and the wrestlers know it is not just an ordinary dual. “The whole Ohio State atmosphere with Michigan — we want to beat them; they want to beat us,” sophomore captain Ian Paddock said. “So, that always adds to the competition.” Members of the winning team will receive gold singlets, like the gold pants trinkets given to victorious football players. Though their records are near opposites — Michigan is 7-2 and the Buckeyes are 2-6 — Ryan said he believes a win is within the Buckeyes’ sights. “We’re looking for a win,” he said. “Despite the struggles we have had, I think the matchups are favorable for us.” A Buckeye victory against the Wolverines rests on the outcome of one key matchup. “It’ll come down to the 197 pounds,” Ryan said. “It’ll be the key match of the night for both programs.” Sponseller said his team is ready for the dual and eager to take on its rival. “Everybody gets geared up,” he said. “It always feels like there’s a rivalry.” Ryan said his captains need to step up for the dual and lead the team to victory. Sponseller said he isn’t taking the challenge lightly. “Not trying to be an enforcer,” he said, “but trying to be a motivator.” The fans will play a key role in Friday’s dual, Sponseller said. “The crowd means a lot,” he said. “It feels like you have an 11th man out there.” Sponseller said he has one plan. “I just plan on going out there,” he said, “and beating Michigan.” read more

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