Nissan and Mobileye are teaming up on ProPilot 20

first_img Intel Nissan Nissan Now playing: Watch this: Post a comment 26 Photos 2:57 2020 Nissan Versa first drive: 15% more price, 100% more car Enlarge ImageProPilot 2.0 allows for hands-free driving on the highway and that ability is powered by Mobileye’s EyeQ4 SOC. Nissan Nissan’s ProPilot Assist was one of the first super-advanced driver-aid suites to be made widely available in an affordable car. It worked well when we tested it, and we were pretty excited when Nissan announced it was working on a Version 2.0.Now we know that Nissan’s not doing Version 2.0 by itself, and that has us even more excited — because it’s working with Intel’s Mobileye to power its hands-off freeway driving feature. Mobileye confirmed the partnership, along with a similar partnership with China’s NIO on Thursday.Specifically, Mobileye’s EyeQ4 system-on-a-chip will be employed by both Nissan and NIO to do some of the computational heavy lifting on the complicated task of safely allowing hands-off, navigated highway driving. Nissan’s version gets a further boost, thanks to Mobileye’s RoadBook system.RoadBook is unique in that it uses aggregated data from vehicles around the world and across a range of manufacturers (so long as they’re equipped with an EyeQ4 system, which Mobileye estimates will be around 20 million vehicles in the next few years) to create high-definition maps for use in self-driving. Nissan will be the first manufacturer to employ the system en masse.Mobileye and Nissan already worked together on a project in 2018 to map all 15,000 miles of Japan’s expressways using an earlier version of RoadBook, and because the maps are being continuously updated and added to in almost real-time, these maps can be used in the development of autonomous vehicles. 2019 Nissan Leaf Plus review: A better EV, but maybe not the best Originally publsihed Aug. 22.Update, Aug. 23: Removes a quote from Mobileye’s CEO at Mobileye’s request.center_img Take an assisted ride with Nissan ProPilot tech on 2018… 2019 Nissan Murano review: Freshened, but not fresh enough 0 Share your voice Tags Intel Mobileye’s autonomous cars in Jerusalem Auto Tech Autonomous Vehicles More From Roadshowlast_img read more

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Rohingya safety citizenship important before repatriation

first_imgRohingya refugees walk at Jamtoli camp in the morning in Cox`s Bazar on 22 January 2018. — ReutersThe UN refugee agency and other groups have urged a rethink of a plan to send Muslim Rohingya refugees back to Myanmar amid fears of forced repatriations without safeguards such as guaranteed citizenship after they fled to Bangladesh to escape bloodshed at home.The calls come as Bangladesh delayed the repatriation of the largely stateless Rohingya to Myanmar that was set to begin on Tuesday, as the process of compiling and verifying the list of people to be sent back was incomplete.“In order for the repatriation to be (done) right, to be sustainable, actually viable…you need to really address a number of issues that for the time being we have heard nothing about,” UNHCR head Filippo Grandi said in Geneva, noting that issues like citizenship had not been addressed.More than 655,500 Muslim Rohingya fled to Bangladesh last year after the Myanmar military cracked down in the northern part of Rakhine state, amid witness reports of killings, looting and rape, in response to militant attacks on security forces on 25 August last year.Many people in Buddhist-majority Myanmar regard the Rohingya as illegal immigrants from Bangladesh. The United Nations described Myanmar’s crackdown as ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya, which Myanmar denies.Grandi said it was important to set up a monitoring mechanism in Myanmar’s Rakhine state for those returning and noted that UNHCR currently did not have the ability to move freely and perform this role there.Myanmar and Bangladesh agreed earlier this month to complete a voluntary repatriation of the refugees in two years. Myanmar says it has set up two reception centres and a temporary camp near the border in Rakhine state to receive the first arrivals.Human Rights Watch, a non-government organization, said on Tuesday that Bangladesh should suspend the plan entirely as it “threatens the refugees’ security and well-being.”The plan has sparked fears in refugee camps in Bangladesh that people may be forced to return despite a lack of guarantees around their security.One Rohingya man detained on Monday by the Bangladeshi military at the Palong Khali refugee camp following a protest against repatriations remained in police custody on Tuesday and was still being interrogated, officials said.“He was detained for instigating violence. He is in custody for interrogation,” local police chief Abul Khayer told Reuters by telephone.A UNHCR official said the agency plans to bring up the detention with Bangladesh during their next meeting, as the refugees were only staging a peaceful protest.Meanwhile, another Reuters report from Geneva says: More time is needed to prepare the return of Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh to northern Rakhine state in Myanmar, the UN refugee chief said on Monday, after a Bangladeshi official said the plan to begin on Tuesday had been delayed.“In order for the repatriation to be right, sustainable, actually viable, you need to really to address a number of issues that for the time being we have heard nothing about, including the citizenship issue, the rights of the Rohingya in Rakhine state, meaning freedom of movement, access to services, to livelihoods,” Filippo Grandi told Reuters.last_img
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What Does Houstons Sister City — Leipzig Germany — Have To Teach

first_img X Listen commons.wikimedia.orgThe German city of Leipzig is the most populous city in the federal state of Saxony and has been one of Houston’s sister cities since 1992. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: center_img 00:00 /06:37 Houston Matters tends to focus on subjects that are close to home, whether with the city, the state, or the U.S. But well beyond international borders there are cities abroad that have some kind of effect on — or connection with — Greater Houston. It’s almost unavoidable given how diverse our population is.So how much does that outside world affect us here in Houston?Houston has 18 different sister cities. One of them is Leipzig, Germany. Now, while those kinds of things usually sound more ceremonial than anything, is there anything we could actually learn from one of our sister cities?The Sister Cities International program, part of the Mayor’s Office of Trade and International Affairs, gets at the heart of that.We learn more from Susan Young, the organization’s board secretary, and Steven Braun, the vice president of the Houston-Leipzig Sister City Association. Sharelast_img read more

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