Ginger Moxey appointed Bahamas and Caribbean Representative for Sister Cities International

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppBahamas, August 2, 2017 – Nassau – Sister Cities International’s Board of Directors approved Ms. Ginger Moxey, President & CEO of Immerse Bahamas, to be the Country Representative for the Bahamas and Regional Representative for the Caribbean during the 61st Annual Conference in Virginia Beach on July 14th. “In her new role, she serves as an integral part of Sister Cities International’s diplomatic and partnership outreach and will help promote the mission of sister cities: to promote peace through mutual respect, cooperation, and understanding—one individual, one community at a time,” stated Chairman Tim Quigley.Country and Regional Representatives are highly distinguished leaders of Sister Cities International who help connect the organization with communities abroad. Ms. Moxey is highly suited to take on the role of Caribbean Representative due to her vast national and international network and previous work developing sister city partnerships in the Bahamas.“The opportunities and benefits of Sister Cities International need to be fully explored throughout the Caribbean. There are many worthwhile initiatives that can be executed to bring about sustained development,” said Ms. Moxey. These initiatives will cover a broad range of topics that fall under four categories: youth and education; arts and culture; business and trade; and community development. Ms. Moxey hopes to establish an annual regional conference in 2018 that will specifically cater to reinvigorating existing sister city relationships between Caribbean and U.S. cities. Sister Cities International looks forward to working with Ms. Moxey in her new role and is confident that her experience and network will be beneficial to all partnerships in the Caribbean.Cities in the Caribbean region interested in developing or renewing a sister city relationship can contact Ms. Moxey atgmoxey@immersebahamas.com.Pictured from Left to Right: Tim Quigley, Chairman, Sister Cities International; Ginger M. Moxey, President & CEO, Immerse Bahamas Co. Ltd.; Mary Kane, President & CEO, Sister Cities International; and Ron Nirenberg, Vice Chairman, Sister Cities International at the 61st Annual Sister Cities International Conference in Virginia Beach, Virginia.Release: sistercities.org Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:last_img read more

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5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Saturday January 12 2019

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are 5 things to do in Wilmington on Saturday, January 12, 2019:#1) Women’s Roller Derby At ShrinersBoston Roller Derby, a Boston-based, female-only roller derby league, returns to the Shriners Auditorium (99 Fordham Road). This night will see rematches of the Fez Cup from 2018.5PM: Nutcrackers vs. Harbor Horrors7PM: Wicked Pissahs vs. CosmonaughtiesDoors open at 4pm.  Lice music begins at 4:30pm. The action begins at 5pm.  An After Party starts at 9pm in the Fez Room. Tickets include admission to the game, plus entry into the after party. Tickets and more info are available HERE. Learn more about the league HERE.#2) Fortnite Tournament At LibraryThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is holding a Fortnite Tournament at 1:30pm. Got a couple Victory Royales under your belt and fancy yourself good at Fortnite? Show off your skills at this tournament run by One Up Games! Friendlies begin at 1pm. Grades 4-8. Register HERE. If registration is full, sign up for the wait list.#3) Book Store Next Door OpenThe Friends of the Wilmington Memorial Library’s Book Store Next Door (183 Middlesex Avenue) is open from 10am to 4pm. All books are $2 or less!  Every penny of every sale benefits the Wilmington Memorial Library. Learn more HERE.#4) Wilmington Food Pantry OpenThe Wilmington Food Pantry (142 Chestnut Street) is open from 10am to noon for food donation drop-offs. Learn which food items the Pantry is most in need of HERE.#5) WHS Boys & Girls Hockey, Wrestling In ActionThe WHS Boys Varsity Hockey Team travels to Stoneham at 4pm, with the WHS Girls Varsity Hockey Team following at 6pm. The WHS Boys Wrestling Team is hosting a multi-school meet at 10am at Wilmington High.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Saturday, August 3, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Saturday, June 15, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Saturday, May 18, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

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Rajkummar Rao signs 3 films deal with Karan Johar for Rs 24

first_imgRajkummar Rao, Karan JoharInstagramOnce underrated, now one of the most sought after actors in Bollywood, Rajkummar Rao has come a long way proving his mettle time and again on the silver screen. The actor has managed to put himself on the wishlist of several Bollywood filmmakers by delivering back-to-back hits at the box office and winning several accolades to his name. And now reports are doing the rounds of the industry that Rajkummar has signed a 3 films deal with Karan Johar for a whopping Rs 24 crore.If the industry grapevine is to be believed, Karan Johar is trying to experiment with his usual filmmaking process by picking up some heartland stories. And to do justice to the stories, KJo couldn’t think of anyone else than Rajkummar to portray these roles which would be hand-wired to the backdrop of a small town.With this exuberant deal, Rajkummmar who reportedly used to draw a fee of Rs 4-6 crore for his film, would now be getting upto Rs 8 crore (approximately) for each of the three films.And it looks like Rajkummar and Karan Johar are already having a good tuning with each other which would eventually make things easier for both to bring out the desire outcome on the big screen. When Rajkummar graced the Koffee couch, he said that he would want to work alongside Karan Johar in a film about same sex-love.However, an official confirmation about Rajkummar and Karan Johar’s collaboration is still awaited. On a related note, Rajkummar recently bagged the ‘Performer of the Year’ award at the Filmfare Middle East Awards 2019 ceremony held in Oman.”It’s a great honour to receive this award. I also feel gratified in a way to know that my films not only entertain audiences in India but globally,” Rajkummar said in a statement.”I’ve had very distinguished films in 2018 and this win certifies that the audiences are also open to experimentation and watching something new and interesting,” he added.He is now looking forward to this year’s anticipated films, including Mental Hai Kya, Turram Khan, Imli and Made In China.last_img read more

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Video of adult tigress beaten to death by mob in Uttar Pradesh

first_imgCreative CommonsAt a time when conservation of animals, especially tigers, is the talk in the country, a group of villagers of the Mataina village in Uttar Pradesh mercilessly beat an adult tigress to death because she mauled and injured a person belonging to the village earlier that day.A full two-minute video of the disturbing incident emerged with the person talking the video giving a voice-over, explaining what happened. The tigress was six-years-old and had broken ribs and injuries across her body. She was cremated after the forest officials conducted a post-mortem, NDTV reports.Warning : this is disturbing content . A 5 year old adult tigress was beaten to death by villagers in UP’s #Pilibhit on thursday afternoon . In this mobile video shot by a villager , there ‘s even background commentary on why they are killing the tigress ! Really sad ! pic.twitter.com/FY7ToT3TGA— Alok Pandey (@alok_pandey) July 26, 2019 The incident took place in a village close to the Pilibhit Tiger Reserve on Wednesday afternoon. It is situated 240 kilometres away from Lucknow. “She had sustained fractures and injuries from sharp-edged weapons like spears on almost every part of her body. She also had broken ribs,” H Rajamohan, the director of Pilibhit Tiger Reserve told IANS.At least 30 people participated in beating the animal up and the police have filed an FIR against 31 villagers. They have been charged under the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act 1960. Reports claim that the villager did not let the forest officials through and take her to the hospital till she was dead.”A forest team did reach the spot but by that time, the tigress was in so much pain that even an attempt to tranquilize her would have added to her plight,” Vaibhav Shrivastava , Pilibhit’s District Magistrate said.”The tigress could have been rescued and given timely medical aid as the forest officials had reached the spot. But their inability to rescue the injured big cat in a span of over nine hours undoubtedly reflects their inability in protecting wildlife in adverse situations,” GC Misra, the Former field director of Dudhwa Tiger Reserve said.The Pilibhit district and Pilibhit Tiger Reserve alone have witnessed the deaths of 16 tigers and 3 leopards since 2012. the most common causes of death were snaring, poisoning, and contagious diseases like canine distemper. However, there were very few cases of deaths due to infighting.last_img read more

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IISWBM setting new benchmarks in management

first_imgEstablished in April 1953, Indian Institute of Social Welfare and Business Management (IISWBM), the first management institute in India, still stands out to be one of the most reputed and acknowledged management institutions of the country. Enlightened Indians like Pt Jawaharlal Nehru, Dr Bidhan Chandra Roy, the then Chief Minister of West Bengal and Prof DK Sanyal set up the institution keeping a unique dimension in mind. With social welfare programmes and management courses under the same roof, this institute has earned numerous accolades to its name. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfOver the decades, IISWBM has successfully kept its intellectual tradition alive by recruiting imminent faculty members, preserving the learning environment, nurturing intellectual minds, and maintaining infrastructure facilities. With sixty four years into management, its journey has been studded with glorious achievements. Being one of the highest ranking B-schools since its inception, the institute might soon get upgraded to a University and with the new campus coming up in the satellite city of Kolkata (Newtown), the institute has plans to start some academic programmes there by 2019. Involved in research and consultancy work, several faculty members have won many prestigious awards and the Institute itself boasts of alumni in various prestigious organisations both in India and abroad. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveProf (Dr) Amitava Sarkar, the Director of IISWBM, who has long been associated with the institute, opens up about their success story, uniqueness and big plans ahead.What separates IISWBM from other management institutes?This is the first management and social welfare institute that started in India. We have our heritage. When we started, the concept of bringing social welfare programs and business management courses together was one of a kind; a concept alien to many. After all, social welfare programs in order to survive, need to be managed well and similarly, if management studies are devoid of any ties to social welfare, it will fail. I don’t think there are institutions where these two fields are together under the same roof and even if there are such institutions, they definitely did not start back at the time we did. From early 1950s onward, we have always tried to remain relevant, keeping in tune with upcoming demands. What should be done so that more people get access to education?I believe we have quite a number of good institutions offering programmes in various fields. And the lack of access that we have faced a couple of decades back has gone down to a great extent. We have not been able to match up with the demands in certain fields with openings in higher education institutions. I don’t want to blame the planners or the government but this happens because it is a fast changing world. We don’t know which particular field is going to occupy the centre stage two years down the line or what particular demands are going to come up and we are always a couple of steps behind in supplying the required academic programmes and institutions. That’s where the mismatch happens. This is mainly due to fast changes and our inability to forecast. Which are some of the offbeat courses that are offered in your institution?Apart from the flagship programs like Master of Business Administration, Master of Human Resource Management, the Institute also conducts full-time programmes in affiliation with the University of Calcutta in Sports Management, Media Management, and Retail Management among others. We offer programmes in fire safety management as well. We have also condensed our three years MBA evening program into 2 years and the response has been amazing. We are the first institution to start with a two -year full time MBA evening program. In addition, the Institute introduced an M Phil programme since 2014, and plans to commence a PhD programme, affiliated to University of Calcutta to match demands for higher/research studies in management, social welfare and public systems.Our faculty is very actively involved in research and projects. We offer our expertise in number of projects for various government and non-government institutions. We also work very closely with NTPC, Adani and Reliance among others. We are also collaborating with the Reserve Bank of India as they want us to conduct a training program on induction, and mentor their senior as well as junior officers.Is there any new collaboration with a foreign university on its way?I have a different view with regard to collaboration. If we look into collaboration itself carefully, we will see that many foreign institutions are coming here for students and they try to use institutions as agents. But essentially what they do is that Indians and foreign institutions train the students for two terms each and give them a joint certificate. However, there are only a few who can afford it. In my opinion, I would like to collaborate in terms of research, in terms of faculty and students exchange and not in terms of just offering a joint programme. As a matter of fact, the collaboration that I’m talking about in terms of research has always been there. We share ideas, articles and invite each other, which is much more effective. Otherwise collaborations do not serve any real purpose. Probably, there is some flamboyance in collaboration, but if looked into carefully, it doesn’t serve much purpose. What, in your opinion, distinguishes the Indian system of education, from those abroad?I believe that the distinction which we used to face three or four decades back, is not there that much. There’s a usual kind of complaint that comes from the industry that our syllabus/ curriculum is often outdated; the curriculums do not match the industry requirements, particularly in India. But I don’t think that’s totally true. I agree that it used to be like that a few decades ago but not any longer. I ask industry people whether they have actually taken a look at the curriculum and in most cases the answer is ‘no’. 90 per cent of those who criticise blindly our education systems, saying that it is not up to the mark or lagging behind from what are offered abroad, particularly in the West, don’t see them carefully. I know for a fact that there’s no significant difference in the programmes. The question should be about deliverance. They may have better teachers there or better systems of deliverance, or better students who can accept what is taught but we are no less. Yes, there are problems of delivery. Although I agree that it is acute in India, western countries also face this at some level or the other. Look at how eagerly they look for Indian software developers. Given the recent happenings, if all the Indian software developers have to come back, then I don’t know what they will do. So this problem is not unique to India or the developing countries. Lack of funding also leads to several problems. Many colleges can’t afford proper equipment at labs or other means of technology needed for better learning. But it is not that we do not know about these problems. I really hope people start looking beyond the surface level. Tell us about the new campus…We have our new campus coming up in Rajarhat (Newtown). It’s been a year that work has started and the entire foundation piling has already been completed. Situated in the so called academic hub, it will have a 12 storey academic building, separate girls’ and boys’ hostels, and staff quarters. In fact, last week we had a meeting with HIDCO and it was decided that by 2019 it would be at least partially complete so that we start teaching some of the courses there. We would like to do it a bit sequentially. Of course the entire establishment is not going to shift at one go as it is neither desirable nor possible. Our USP is this location.last_img read more

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Homeless babies at risk of poor health

first_imgBabies born to homeless women are more likely to have poor health and development outcomes, says a study.The findings showed that babies who experienced both pre- and post-natal homelessness and those who experienced homelessness for longer than six months were at a highest risk of negative health outcomes. “These findings back up what we already knew about how the stress of homelessness affects children’s heath,” said Megan Sandel, paediatrician at Children’s HealthWatch, from the Boston Medical Centre (BMC) in the US. “But this helps us determine which children are at greatest risk, and makes the argument that policymakers and providers need to intervene to change the trajectory of a child’s development,” Sandel added.The study, published in Pediatrics, shows that the earlier and the longer a child experiences homelessness may have a larger cumulative toll of poor health and development outcomes.last_img read more

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