The Wilmington Insider For July 5 2018

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below is a round-up of what’s going on in Wilmington on Thursday, July 5, 2018:Happening Today:Weather: Sunny, with a high near 95. Heat index values as high as 100. Light southwest wind increasing to 6 to 11 mph in the morning.In The Community: Windsor Place (92 West Street) is holding a free Chair Yoga Class at 10am. All are welcome to attend Marianne’s bi-monthly yoga class. Yoga is a study of your body, mind and breath. It is about learning how to undo unconscious repetitive patterns of movement that do not serve us well. Yoga teaches us how to open up the joints of our body and allow more supple movement of the spine, freeing ourselves of tension and stress. This class will last for 45 minutes.In The Community: Do you like to sing? Do you enjoy performing? Come join the Merrimack Valley Chorus at one of its regular weekly rehearsals. You just might discover a passion for a cappella singing, and you’ll also make some great new friends! Open rehearsals are every Thursday at 7pm at the Wilmington Arts Center (219 Middlesex Avenue).In The Community: The Town Beach is open today.  Lifeguards are on duty from 10am to 8pm. Admission is FREE for residents. Proof of residency is required. Learn more HERE.At The Library: Baby Time at 9:30am. Time For Twos at 10:30am. [Learn more and register HERE.]At The Senior Center: Walking Group at 8am. Computer Class at 9am. Art Class at 10am. Aerobics at 10:30am. Knitting/Crocheting at 11am. Ceramics at 1pm. Game Day at 1pm. [Learn more HERE.]At The Town Museum: The Wilmington Town Museum is open from 10am to 2pm.(NOTE: What did I miss? Let me know by commenting below, commenting on the Facebook page, or emailing wilmingtonapple@gmail.com. I may be able to update this post.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Sunday, July 21, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Monday, June 17, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Tuesday, September 3, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

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Trump visits Jerusalem seeking elusive peace

first_imgUS President Donald Trump attending a meeting with leaders of the Gulf Cooperation Council at the King Abdulaziz Conference Center in Riyadh. Photo: AFPUS President Donald Trump visits Jerusalem Monday to seek ways to achieve Israeli-Palestinian peace, a goal that has eluded his predecessors but which he says could be easier than “people have thought”.Trump’s visit is part of his first trip abroad as president and follows an initial stop in Saudi Arabia, where he urged Islamic leaders to take a stand against violence committed in the name of religion.It also comes as he contends with a raft of problems back home, including a special counsel investigating whether his associates colluded with Russia.Trump is due in Tel Aviv on Monday afternoon and, ahead of talks with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, will tour two iconic sites in Jerusalem, a city holy to Muslims, Christians and Jews.His first stop will be the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, built at the site where Christians believe Jesus was crucified, buried and resurrected.Afterwards, he is expected to become the first sitting US president to visit the Western Wall, the holiest site where Jews can pray and located in east Jerusalem.The Western Wall visit drew controversy before Trump even left Washington, when US officials declined to say whether it belonged to Israel.“Jerusalem was and will always be the capital of Israel,” Netanyahu said late Sunday. “The Temple Mount and the Western Wall will always remain under Israeli sovereignty.”Israel occupied east Jerusalem and the West Bank in 1967 in moves never recognised by the international community.It later annexed east Jerusalem and claims the entire city as its capital. The Palestinians see east Jerusalem as the capital of their future state.Trump will meet Netanyahu at 6:00 pm (1500 GMT).Enormous challenge“I will discuss with President Trump ways to strengthen even further the first and strongest alliance with the US,” Netanyahu said Sunday.“We will strengthen security ties, which are strengthening daily, and we will also discuss ways to advance peace.”The United States is Israel’s most important ally, providing it with more than $3 billion in defence aid annually.On Tuesday, Trump will meet Palestinian president Mahmud Abbas in Bethlehem in the West Bank, visit the Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial in Jerusalem and give a speech at the Israel Museum.Any leader would face an enormous challenge in seeking to bring the Israelis and Palestinians together for meaningful talks, and Trump’s inexperience and domestic political struggles will only add to it.He has spoken of his self-described deal-making prowess in declaring that the “ultimate deal” is possible, vowing “we will get it done”.“It is something that I think is frankly maybe not as difficult as people have thought over the years,” Trump said when meeting Abbas in Washington earlier this month.Trump has sent mixed signals about how he will approach the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.He cast uncertainty over years of international efforts to foster a two-state solution when he met Netanyahu at the White House in February.Criticism of IranAt that meeting, he said he would support a single state if it led to peace, delighting Israeli right-wingers who want to see most of the West Bank annexed.At the same time, he urged Israel to hold back on settlement building in the West Bank, a longstanding concern of Palestinians and much of the world.Trump advocated during his campaign breaking with decades of precedent and moving the American embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, deeply alarming Palestinians.He has since said the move was still being looked at.Trump’s seeming openness to at least some of Abbas’s concerns has given Palestinians more reason for hope than many may have expected, but still reason to remain wary, some analysts say.On the Israeli side, Netanyahu heads what is seen as the most right-wing government in the country’s history, and members of his coalition were elated with Trump’s election.Some even called for an end to the idea of a Palestinian state.Trump’s actions since have left them disappointed, with the embassy remaining in Tel Aviv—at least for now—and the White House seeking to restart peace efforts.In Saudi Arabia on Sunday, Trump told dozens of Muslim leaders the time had come for “honestly confronting the crisis of Islamic extremism”.He also lashed out at Iran, accusing Tehran of fuelling “the fires of sectarian conflict and terror” and calling for its international isolation.After Israel and the Palestinian territories, Trump will head to the Vatican along with Brussels and Italy for NATO and G7 meetings.last_img read more

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People who care for others may live longer

first_imgOlder people who help and support others may live longer than those who do not, a new study has claimed.Researchers, including those from Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Germany, conducted survival analyses of over 500 people aged between 70 and 103 years, drawing on data collected between 1990 and 2009.The researchers compared grandparents who provided occasional childcare with those who did not, as well as with older adults who did not have children or grandchildren but who provided care for others in their social network. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe results of their analyses show that this kind of care-giving can have a positive effect on the mortality of the carers.Half of the grandparents who took care of their grandchildren were still alive about ten years after the first interview in 1990.The same applied to participants who did not have grandchildren, but who supported their children – for example, by helping with housework. In contrast, about half of those who did not help others died within five years. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe researchers were also able to show that this positive effect of care-giving on mortality was not limited to help and care-giving within the family. The data analysis showed that childless older adults who provided others with emotional support, for example, also benefited.Half of these helpers lived for another seven years, whereas non-helpers on average lived for only another four years. “But helping should not be misunderstood as a panacea for a longer life,” said Ralph Hertwig from Max Planck Institute for Human Development.“A moderate level of care-giving involvement does seem to have positive effects on health. But previous studies have shown that more intense involvement causes stress, which has negative effects on physical and mental health,” said Hertwig.As it is not customary for grandparents in Germany and Switzerland to take custodial care of their grandchildren, primary and custodial caregivers were not included in the analyses. Researchers think that prosocial behaviour was originally rooted in the family.“It seems plausible that the development of parent’s and grandparent’s prosocial behaviour toward their kin left its imprint on the human body in terms of a neural and hormonal system that subsequently laid the foundation for the evolution of cooperation and altruistic behaviour towards non-kin,” said Sonja Hilbrand from the University of Basel in Switzerland.The study was published in the journal Evolution and Human Behaviour.last_img read more

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