San Diego proposing ordinance to regulate Segway tour companies

first_img October 17, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – San Diego plans to crack down on local Segway tour operators following a $1.7 million injury settlement in June and another lawsuit filed last spring claiming a protruding sidewalk caused the death of a Segway rider two years ago, it was reported Wednesday.An ordinance proposed by city officials would require Segway tour companies to apply for special permits, follow safety procedures and obtain commercial liability insurance of at least $2 million per case and $4 million per year, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported.The ordinance discussed aims to shrink the number of injury crashes and limit the city’s vulnerability to large payouts when injuries occur.In the case that led to the $1.7 million settlement, the tour company that rented out the Segway didn’t contribute to the payout because it didn’t have liability insurance and the company’s owner had limited assets, according to the Union-Tribune.Segways, which were invented in 2002, are two-wheeled motorized vehicles that carry one person standing upright. Segway is the name of the leading company in the industry.In order to make sure the city’s new law would also apply to competitors, it refers to the vehicles as “electronic assistive personal mobility devices,” the Union-Tribune reported.The new law would not apply to the electric scooters that have become increasingly popular in San Diego this year, according to the Union-Tribune. City officials are exploring separate legislation for those devices.The ordinance would require Segway tour companies to obtain a special permit requiring them to have adequate insurance and follow new safety procedures.Those safety procedures would include prohibiting Segway use by intoxicated people, requiring users under 18 to be accompanied by an adult, requiring tour guides to have a driver’s license and conducting on-site training for all riders before tours, the Union-Tribune reported. Companies would have to pay a $48 annual fee for a permit.The new legislation was prompted by a $1.7 million payout by the city to a woman who suffered a shattered pelvis in a Segway crash on a La Jolla street three years ago.The settlement includes $1.5 million for Regina Capobianco, who was injured when she drove a Segway over a large area of damaged street on Camino de la Costa at Winamar Avenue in July 2015, and $200,000 for her husband, Christopher Capobianco, because her injuries damaged their marriage, according to the Union-Tribune.A few months before the city settled that case in June, the family of Jeff Hassett filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the city blaming a protruding section of sidewalk in Old Town for his eventual death.The suit, filed by Hassett’s four siblings, claims Hassett struck a 3- inch to 4-inch concrete stub in the sidewalk, created by a light pole removal on Taylor Street near Congress Street, while riding a Segway in March 2016, the Union-Tribune reported. Hassett suffered broken ribs, a toe injury that required amputation and damage to an internal heart defibrillator.The heart issue and an infection eventually caused his death in May 2016, according to the Union-Tribune. The budget committee will continue to research the issue and will resume discussion at their next meeting scheduled for November 14, 2018. Updated: 11:55 AM Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwittercenter_img KUSI Newsroom San Diego proposing ordinance to regulate Segway tour companies Posted: October 17, 2018last_img read more

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The Wilmington Insider For July 5 2018

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below is a round-up of what’s going on in Wilmington on Thursday, July 5, 2018:Happening Today:Weather: Sunny, with a high near 95. Heat index values as high as 100. Light southwest wind increasing to 6 to 11 mph in the morning.In The Community: Windsor Place (92 West Street) is holding a free Chair Yoga Class at 10am. All are welcome to attend Marianne’s bi-monthly yoga class. Yoga is a study of your body, mind and breath. It is about learning how to undo unconscious repetitive patterns of movement that do not serve us well. Yoga teaches us how to open up the joints of our body and allow more supple movement of the spine, freeing ourselves of tension and stress. This class will last for 45 minutes.In The Community: Do you like to sing? Do you enjoy performing? Come join the Merrimack Valley Chorus at one of its regular weekly rehearsals. You just might discover a passion for a cappella singing, and you’ll also make some great new friends! Open rehearsals are every Thursday at 7pm at the Wilmington Arts Center (219 Middlesex Avenue).In The Community: The Town Beach is open today.  Lifeguards are on duty from 10am to 8pm. Admission is FREE for residents. Proof of residency is required. Learn more HERE.At The Library: Baby Time at 9:30am. Time For Twos at 10:30am. [Learn more and register HERE.]At The Senior Center: Walking Group at 8am. Computer Class at 9am. Art Class at 10am. Aerobics at 10:30am. Knitting/Crocheting at 11am. Ceramics at 1pm. Game Day at 1pm. [Learn more HERE.]At The Town Museum: The Wilmington Town Museum is open from 10am to 2pm.(NOTE: What did I miss? Let me know by commenting below, commenting on the Facebook page, or emailing wilmingtonapple@gmail.com. I may be able to update this post.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Sunday, July 21, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Monday, June 17, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Tuesday, September 3, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

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Dark matter hiding in stars may cause observable oscillations

first_imgIn previous research on dark matter stars, it has often been assumed that stars accreting dark matter will continue to grow until they become so dense that they collapse into black holes. However, in the new study the physicists’ simulations showed that these stars actually appear to be stable and do not become black holes. Their stability arises from a self-regulatory mechanism called “gravitational cooling” in which the stars eject mass to slow down and stop their growth before they approach the critical Chandrasekhar limit, the point at which they collapse into black holes. As the scientists explain, the finding that dark matter stars are stable makes a surprising contribution to the research in this area.”Although it was known for some time that dark matter can be accreted by stars and form dark matter cores at their center, those studies were all phenomenological,” Brito said. “In addition, basically all these studies suggested that, if enough dark matter is accreted by a star, it will eventually trigger gravitational collapse and a black hole would form, eventually eating all the star.”We set about checking these claims, using a rigorous fully relativistic framework, i.e., solving the full Einstein’s equations. This is important if we want to understand how the dark matter core behaves for large densities. Well, it turns out that our results show that black hole formation can, in principle, be avoided by ejecting excessive mass: the dark matter core starts ‘repelling’ itself when it is too massive and compact, and is unable to grow past a certain threshold. This is, as far as we know, something that was ignored in previous works. “The above results are quite generic. Because any self-gravitating massive bosonic field can form compact structures, any such putative dark matter component would lead to the kind of effects we discuss in our paper. In this sense it proposes another way to search for these kinds of particles that can be complementary to observations coming from cosmology, for example. Given the lack of information that we have about the nature of dark matter, we think that it might be worth the effort to further develop this subject.”The scientists hope that the results here may help guide future research by suggesting where to look for dark matter and what methods to use to detect it.”We don’t know much about dark matter,” Brito said. “The only thing we do know is that all kinds of matter (be it regular matter or dark, invisible matter) fall in the same way in gravitational fields. This is Einstein’s equivalence principle in action. Thus, dark matter also falls in the usual way. It seems therefore appropriate to look for effects of dark matter in regions where gravity is strong, like neutron stars, black holes, etc. We are now trying to understand how dark matter behaves generically in regions of strong gravity.”At this precise moment, we are working on a long version of this letter. We want to understand in depth how the dark matter core grows for different kind of scenarios, and how viscosity in the star’s material affects the development of the accretion process.” (Phys.org)—Dark matter has never been seen directly, but scientists know that something massive is out there due to its gravitational effects on visible matter. One explanation for how such a large amount of mass appears to be right in front of our eyes yet completely invisible by conventional means is that the dark matter is hiding in the centers of stars. This sequence shows snapshots of a star’s density when two dark matter cores collide, where the x-axis is the plane of collision (only half the space is shown, but the remaining space can be obtained by symmetry). Although the final configuration is more compact and massive than the original, the star does not collapse into a black hole because it ejects some of its mass, slowing down its growth so that it remains stable. Credit: Brito, et al. ©2015 American Physical Society Dark matter guides growth of supermassive black holes In a new study, physicists have investigated the possibility that large amounts of hidden mass inside stars might be composed of extremely lightweight hypothetical particles called axions, which are a primary dark matter candidate. The scientists, Richard Brito at the University of Lisbon in Portugal; Vitor Cardoso at the University of Lisbon and the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada; and Hirotada Okawa at Kyoto University and Waseda University, both in Japan, have published their paper on dark matter in stars in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.”Our work studies how dark matter piles up inside stars if the dark matter is composed of massive bosonic particles (axions are an example of such particles),” Brito told Phys.org. “Our results show that dark matter accretion by stars does not lead to gravitational collapse; instead it may give rise to characteristic vibrations in stars.” The researchers theoretically showed that, if numerous axions were to pile up inside normal stars, then the dark matter core would oscillate. The oscillating core would in turn cause the star’s fluid to oscillate in tune with it at a specific frequency related to the star’s mass, or at multiples of this frequency. For a typical axion mass, the oscillating stars would emit microwave radiation and might have observable effects.”What oscillates is the fluid density and its pressure, but it’s probably correct as well to say that the entire star is oscillating,” Brito explained. “These are like sound waves propagating through the fluid, with a very specific frequency. Oscillations of this kind could, for example, lead to variations in the luminosity or in the temperature of the star, and these are quantities that we can measure directly.”In fact, there is already a whole branch of physics called asteroseismology, which studies the internal structure of stars by observing their oscillation modes. This is very much like the way scientists study the internal structure of the Earth by looking at seismic waves. It is possible that the oscillations of a star driven by a dark matter core could also be observed using similar methods. Given the very specific frequencies at which these stars would vibrate, this could be a smoking gun for the presence of dark matter. Asteroseismology is still in its infancy but it will, almost certainly, become a very precise way of observing stars in the future.” © 2015 Phys.org More information: Richard Brito, Vitor Cardoso, and Hirotada Okawa. “Accretion of dark matter by stars.” Physical Review Letters. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.111301, Also at arXiv:1508.04773 [gr-qc] Citation: Dark matter hiding in stars may cause observable oscillations (2015, September 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-09-dark-stars-oscillations.html Explore further Journal information: Physical Review Letters This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Drishtikone premiered amidst much fanfare

first_imgDrishtikone, one of the most awaited films from the house of Surinder Films, directed by Kaushik Ganguly, was premiered in Kolkata, amidst much fanfare. The entire cast and crew members including Prosenjit Chatterjee, Rituparna Sengupta, Churni Ganguly, Kaushik Ganguly, Kaushik Sen, Anupam Roy, Rupankar Bagchi, Iman Chakraborty, Paloma were present at the star-studded premiere. National Award Winner, Kaushik Ganguly – one of the most sought-after directors of contemporary cinema, who is instrumental in lending voice to the current issues, exploring the society in a completely different light, defining human relationships and unfolding the various layers that comprise of these relationships – has come up with the story of Drishtikone. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”I conceived Drishtikone with Prosenjit and Rituparna along with Churni Ganguly, Kaushik Sen and myself in mind. The on-screen chemistry between Prosenjit-Rituparna is unparalleled. The magic created by them is amazing. The entire cast and crew members have put in their best efforts in the making of Drishtikone. It is heartening for us that the trailer and the songs have created a buzz in the market and people are looking forward to watch the film. Drishtikone is one of my dream projects, something which I yearned to present for years. We all are hopeful that Drishtikone, the 48th film of Prosenjit – Rituparna pair will create a milestone in the history of Bengali cinema”, said Kaushik Ganguly. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveIt is a story about a successful lawyer, Mitra (Prosenjit Chatterjee) – who lives a happy and content married life and Sen (Rituparna Sengupta) – who seeks Mitra’s help with a serious and complicated legal case. It is during the whole pursuit of solving the case that the two prime characters of the film get enrolled in a relationship and the definition of their relation keeps evolving throughout the length of the film; a relation which speaks of love that is not quite known to us. It is a different insight into the journeys of friendship and love through various perspectives (Drishtikone). Churni Ganguly is seen as Mitra’s wife and has a very crucial role in the story. Kaushik Ganguly will mesmerise the viewers with his cameo yet again in a very important part in the film as Sen’s brother-in-law. The music for the film has been composed by Anupam Roy which is a chartbuster. Apart from Anupam, the songs are rendered by Iman Chakraborty, Rupankar Bagchi and Paloma.Drishtikone has released in all the major single screens and multiplexes across West Bengal.last_img read more

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Four Seasons to open first mountain destination in Europe

first_img Friday, December 9, 2016 Tags: Four Seasons, France, Luxury Travel, Ski Resorts Four Seasons to open first mountain destination in Europe Travelweek Group Posted bycenter_img << Previous PostNext Post >> TORONTO — Set to open in late 2017 just 44 miles from Geneva International Airport is Four Seasons Hotel, Megève, Four Seasons’ third destination in France.Opening in time for the 2018 winter ski season, the 55-room property is Megève’s first hotel to offer direct access to the Mont d’Arbois slopes and is being billed as a preeminent skier’s paradise with over 130 groomed Alpine runs. It will be nestled into the base of Mont d’Arbois’ mountainside, creating a luxurious haven for skiers looking for ski in/ski out directly on the Alpine range.Within the village of Mont d’Arbois, a collection of existing chalets will be renovated prior to reopening as a Four Seasons hotel, offering guests a second destination in the historic ski village. In addition to the chalet and hotel, Four Seasons will also manage the 18-hole Golf du Mont D’Arbois course designed by Sir Henry Cotton, and four dining offerings throughout the two hotels.More news:  Le Boat has EBBs along with its new 2020 brochureFour Seasons Hotel, Megève is a joint venture between Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts and Edmond de Rothschild Heritage, a lifestyle company owned by Benjamin and Ariane de Rothschild. Commenting on the new development, Ariane said, “This partnership will bring new dimensions not only to our hospitality at Mont d’Arbois but also to the town of Megève. The professionalism, international network and longstanding experience of Four Seasons in the hospitality industry are second to none, and I am particularly proud that the Hotel and Chalet in Megève will be Four Seasons first luxury mountain destination in Europe.”Four Seasons Hotel, Megève and the Chalet du Mont d’Arbois, Megève, A Four Seasons Hotel will mark the third Four Seasons destination in France, joining the legendary Four Seasons Hotel George V, Paris and Grand-Hôtel du Cap-Ferrat, A Four Seasons Hotel in the French Riviera. The Hotel will be the fifth ski destination in the company’s portfolio, joining Four Seasons Resort and Residences Whistler, Four Seasons Resort and Residences Vail, Four Seasons Resort Rancho Encantado Santa Fe and Four Seasons Resort and Residences Jackson Hole. Sharelast_img read more

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