Dunkins Halloween Costume Contest Offers A Chance To Win A Years Worth

first_img(NOTE: Wilmington has EIGHT Dunkin’ locations — 195 Main Street, 321 Main Street, 586 Main Street, 357 Middlesex Avenue, 66 Concord Street, 211 Lowell Street, 316 Lowell Street, and 206 Ballardvale Street.)CANTON, MA — As the brand that delivers delight each Halloween with special donuts and more, Dunkin’ has seen its own fans in turn celebrate the spirit of the season by sharing hundreds of homemade Halloween Dunkin-themed costumes to social media. Dunkin’ is joining the fun this year by rewarding its fans’ imagination and inspiration, launching a special costume contest for the chance to win some treats without having to ring a single doorbell. Beginning today, a Dunkin’ costume could equal free coffee and cash, as fans who post a photo of their Dunkin’-inspired Halloween costume on Instagram using the special hashtag #DunkinDressUpContest will have the chance to win a grand prize of $1,000 and a year’s worth of Dunkin’ coffee. Plus, one winner each week will receive $100 Dunkin’ gift cards to help them keep running on Dunkin’ long after the Halloween fun is over.Dunkin’s costume contest launches today, October 17, and continues through November 1. No purchase necessary; 18+ US only. For full rules and details please visit http://www.ddsweeps.com.Dunkin’ restaurants are already helping people across the country enjoy a few moments of Halloween joy any time of day with seasonal treats sure to bring a smile to kids of all ages. For a frightfully fun donut design, Dunkin’s Spider Donut is frosted with orange icing and topped with a glazed chocolate MUNCHKINS® donut hole treat decorated to look like a sweet-never-scary spider. Dunkin’ is also giving its classic donuts a Halloween look, with decorations including orange and purple icing drizzles and sprinkles.OREO cookies are dressing up as Dunkin’ for Halloween this year with the OREO Donut, filled with vanilla buttercreme and topped with chocolate icing, crumbled OREO cookie topping and an orange icing drizzle. For a sweet sip to lift spirits, OREO Hot Chocolate with the rich flavors of cookies and cream is available as part of Dunkin’s selection of hot winter beverages, which also includes Original Hot Chocolate and Dunkaccino.Guests can sink their fangs into the Spider Donut at participating Dunkin’ restaurants nationwide through Halloween. The OREO Donut and OREO Hot Chocolate are both available into November.To learn more about Dunkin’, visit http://www.DunkinDonuts.com or subscribe to the Dunkin’ blog to receive notifications at https://news.dunkindonuts.com/blog.About Dunkin’Founded in 1950, Dunkin’ is America’s favorite all-day, everyday stop for coffee and baked goods. Dunkin’ is a market leader in the hot regular/decaf/flavored coffee, iced regular/decaf/flavored coffee, donut, bagel and muffin categories. Dunkin’ has earned a No. 1 ranking for customer loyalty in the coffee category by Brand Keys for 12 years running. The company has more than 12,600 restaurants in 46 countries worldwide. Based in Canton, Mass., Dunkin’ is part of the Dunkin’ Brands Group, Inc. (Nasdaq: DNKN) family of companies. For more information, visit http://www.DunkinDonuts.com.(NOTE: The above press release is from Dunkin’.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedDunkin’s Pumpkin Menu To Arrive In Wilmington By August 21In “Business”Dunkin Donuts Introduces New Almond Joy Hot ChocolatesIn “Business”Dunkin’ Donuts Launches New Dunkin’ Go2s (New $2, $3 & $5 Value Menu )In “Business”last_img read more

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AFRO Exclusive with Taraji P Henson

first_imgBy Micha Green, AFRO Washington, D.C. Editor, mgreen@afro.comIn the Black community, mental health is often treated as the elephant in the room that no one really wants to talk about.Between “praying the pain away,” worrying about “airing dirty laundry,” and thinking therapy is for “privileged people,” many in communities of color keep mental and emotional health challenges inside, as opposed to seeking help for their illnesses. Not getting professional help for mental health issues can lead to further physical health issues including high blood pressure, muscle pain, addiction and death.Taraji P. Henson sat down with AFRO Washington, D.C. Editor to discuss her organization, the Boris Lawrence Henson Foundation, and her conference, “Can We Talk?,” which took place in Washington, D.C. June 7-9. (Photo by Jabray Franklin AFRO Intern)For these reasons actress and advocate Taraji P. Henson, hopes to break the stigma and silence around mental health with her organization, the Boris Lawrence Henson Foundation, and her conference, “Can We Talk?,” which took place June 7-9 in her hometown, Washington, D.C.In an exclusive AFRO interview, Henson took some time out from the conference to share the importance of her foundation, and why Black people need to talk about mental health.“Because it’s taboo in many ways.  We don’t really talk about it,” Henson told the AFRO.The Boris Lawrence Henson Foundation is named after the actress’ father, who was instrumental in influencing her to go after her artistic endeavors.“My dad was very paramount about me becoming an actress. He sewed great seeds into me.  He told me I was going to be one of the greatest actresses alive when I was little. He always spoke great things into me, so I had no choice but to dream big because those are the seeds he planted,” she said.Notwithstanding her personal career, the D.M.V. native also shared that she named the foundation in honor of her father, after realizing, once he passed, the importance he had in her life by actually talking about mental health.“He was an open book- open road map to his life… He told his truth, he walked in his truth no matter what, and that’s a bold place to live.  A lot of us are really afraid to live in our truth. And that’s what he taught me,” she said. “He was very open and honest about his mental issues.  You never go to war and come back the same. So, I just felt like this was a way to honor his legacy and the things he instilled in me,” the actress and mental health advocate added.Henson noted the domino effect that has taken place in the Black community by not talking about mental health.“That’s why there’s a shortage of African Americans in the field of  mental health, because we don’t talk about it at home. Our children don’t even know, this is a field they can even flourish in.  They’ll say, ‘I want to be a doctor, I want to be a dentist,’ no one ever says, ‘I want to be a psychiatrist, I want to be psychologist, I want to be a therapist, a mental health therapist,’” she told the AFRO. “I think once we have open dialogue about it, people will be more comfortable about being vulnerable.”In opening up about mental health, Henson feels, true change can happen.“We’ve always been taught to keep our problems close to us, but that’s not how you change lives.  You change lives by telling your story, telling your truth, however ugly it may be. No one wants to hear how easy you had it, you can’t change a life like that,” Henson told the AFRO. While the conference is now over, there are still ways to get involved with the foundation, by visiting the website http://www.borislhensonfoundation.org.For those interested in donating to the Boris Lawrence Henson Foundation, the actress has specific instructions. “If you feel like you want to help in any way- any donation is a good donation- you can text, ‘Can We Talk’ to 41444.”last_img read more

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