Brand South Africa: JCI Conference

first_imgThe annual Junior Chamber International (JCI) Conference begins on 4 May at the Sandton Convention Centre. More than just a conference for business minded entrepreneurs, workshops during the event will feature a strong social and community building slant.Junior Chamber International (JCI) members are encouraged to use their business knowledge and experience to become grassroots activists in their own communities. The international non-profit comprises engaged and active citizens committed to improving the globe.Community action to make a better world is one of the principles that drives Brand South Africa as an organisation. For this reason we are proud to be co-sponsors of the event.The African region conference will give young South Africans the opportunity to network with global entrepreneurs and social leaders. Members will spend four days discussing international and regional challenges and sharing experiences that can create positive change across African communities.In October 2015 JCI celebrated its centenary. Branches across the globe celebrated by advocating for more active citizenship. As JCI Ambassador and UN Global Compact Senior Advisor Fred Dubee told a gathering in Finland, “Let us base what we do today and tomorrow on the robust platform that has been erected with so much care and commitment over the past 100 years and as we do, let us be conscious that what we do now will have an impact that will shape the next 100 brilliant and valuable years of JCI.”The organisation’s members believe by being socially active we can create sustainable positive change. Individuals have as much of a responsibility as governments and business to create a more equitable and caring world.Members are guided by five distinct principles:• Educate yourself. By understanding the root causes of communal issues JCI members can prove themselves to be vital in helping make change happen.• Spread awareness: JCI members are encouraged to begin a conversation in their community around challenges. Whether they choose to do that face to face, digitally or through encouraging community participation, members are urged to lead social activism.• Support grassroots efforts: Volunteer or become involved with organisations and campaigns that are working for positive change. If challenges are not being addressed, start a conversation or an organisation. Reach out across communal and national borders to look for solutions or to offer help.• Advocate: All challenges have a face and solutions need to be based on protecting the dignity of people. JCI members are guided by the idea that welcoming people matters more than focusing on what makes us different.• Support approaches that promise long term solutions: Find ways to build vibrant and integrated communities instead of allowing insularity. Host opportunities where people can learn about each other.last_img read more

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AIMIM makes inroads in north Maharashtra

first_imgThe Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) and the Shiv Sena retained most of their seats in north Maharashtra, with a few notable exceptions. But the alliance’s win in 19 of the 36 seats in the region fell short of its 2014 tally by three seats. One of the biggest upsets for the BJP was in Muktainagar in Jalgaon where Rohini Khadse, daughter of veteran leader Eknath Khadse, lost to Chandrakant N. Patil, an Independent, by a margin of 1,957 votes. One of the strongest OBC leaders in the State, Mr. Khadse, who won the seat for six consecutive terms, was denied a ticket this time due to his alleged involvement in a land scam. He was the revenue minister in the Cabinet, before being forced to quit. The BJP also lost its seats in Dhule city, Malkapur and Raver. Meanwhile, in an otherwise successful election for the NCP, Nandgaon proved a sore point as two-time sitting MLA Pankaj Bhujbal lost to the Sena’s Suhas Kande by a margin of 13,889 votes. Incumbent NCP MLAs in Erandol and Baglan also lost their seats to the Sena and BJP respectively. The party however, won five seats, including Sinnar and Devlali, where it beat sitting Sena MLAs.The All India Majlis-e-Ittehad-ul-Muslimeen (AIMIM) was probably the biggest gainer in the region, winning two key constituencies. Mohammad Khalique beat sitting Congress MLA Aasif Rasheed in Malegaon Central, while Faruk Shah won against Independent candidate Rajwardhan Raghujirao in Dhule City by 3,307 votes. These were also the party’s only wins. The incumbent MLA from Dhule City, Anil Gote, was fighting as an Independent and polled an impressive 42,432 votes against Mr. Shah, who won 46,679 votes.Mr. Gote had resigned as MLA protesting BJP minister Girish Mahajan’s alleged authoritarian behaviour.last_img read more

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The Mountain Between Us Starring Kate Winslet and Idris Elba Fatal Vision

first_imgThe Mountain Between Us (Feature)The Mountain Between Us is based on a novel of the same name written by Charles Martin. The story follows 2 strangers, a man and woman, who decide to take a charter plane after their original flight is delayed due to bad weather. Things go from bad to worse after their charter plane crashes and leaves them stranded on a mountain. Although they survived the crash, the two are forced to work together in order to survive the wildness and temperatures well below freezing.Production kicked off at Vancouver International Airport (YVR) on December 5th where, ironically, several flights were delayed due to winter weather conditions.The following day filming took place on a plane and in a hangar at Abbotsford International Airport. Unlike their first day, the weather was clear and beautiful with Mount Baker very prominent in the background. Login/Register With: Twitter Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment center_img Advertisement Facebook Advertisementlast_img read more

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Annual Yukon river race experience of a lifetime

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe annual Yukon River Quest Race is underway in Whitehorse.Fifty-eight teams from around the world are racing through one of the world’s longest rivers to reach the Klondike gold fields in two days.APTN’s Shirley McLean has more on rookie team looking for an experience of a lifetime.last_img

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Ohio States Big Ten Champion rowers speed past competition

The Ohio State rowing team secured the its third Big Ten Championship on Sunday in Indianapolis, earning the seniors their first championship rings. “It was our goal from the first practice this year,” senior MacKenzie Pecor said. The team previously won Big Ten Championships in 2002 and 2006, and Pecor said she’s excited about the opportunity to graduate with a championship. “It is honestly so awesome. Last year was the first class from OSU that graduated without ever winning a championship ring, and we did not want to be the second class to do the same thing,” Pecor said. “You row for four years; you want to win at least once.” Senior Jill Mohr agreed. “It was really a dream come true,” Mohr said. “It’s something that we’ve been looking forward to and something we’ve been working toward since I was a freshman.” Coach Andy Teitelbaum said he was proud to watch his players earn a championship for the school. “It’s just gratifying to see the kids hard work pay off with a championship,” Teitelbaum said. “It was really nice to see a group that lived their talk so well to be rewarded.” The team competed against all six other Big Ten schools that field a rowing team: Michigan, Michigan State, Iowa, Indiana, Wisconsin and Minnesota. The Big Ten title assures it a spot in the national championships scheduled for May 27–29 in Gold River, Calif. Pecor said she expects a change in training to prepare for the national championship but that she does not know how it will differ. “It’s probably going to be a little bit of different training, but we haven’t really discussed it,” she said. “We’re kind of still on a high from the Big Ten.” Teitelbaum, who has coached the Buckeyes since the program’s inception in 1995, said it’s important to continue to progress and stay in shape leading up to the national championships. This year will be the team’s 12th consecutive national championship appearance. Mohr said the team will have to put in a lot of work to succeed. “Our chances as a team are looking really strong going into the national championships,” Mohr said. “We have a lot to prove on the national level and that’s what we’ve been working toward.” read more

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Alex Ivanov growing into leader for Ohio State mens soccer

Redshirt-junior goalkeeper Alex Ivanov prepares to take a free kick during a match against Wright State Sept. 17 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. The teams tied, 0-0.Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorAfter starting seven games for the Ohio State men’s soccer team last season, a confident redshirt-junior Alex Ivanov is having a solid season as goalkeeper for the Buckeyes — but it could just be because of his good luck charm.As a child, playing in goal wasn’t always his preferred position, but his instincts led him to the position he would grow to love.“When I was in the seventh grade, they threw me in the goal because I was the only kid who wanted to dive for the ball and they kind of just kept me in there,” Ivanov said.Last season, Ivanov had the chance to play with current Columbus Crew and former Buckeye goalkeeper Matt Lampson. Lampson posted a 0.86 goals-against average during his career at OSU and produced the second most shutouts in OSU men’s soccer history.Buckeye assistant coach Taly Goode works primarily with goalkeepers and said Ivanov learned how to build good habits from Lampson, which has helped his progression this year.Goode also said more playing time this year has led to an improvement for Ivanov.“Last year, one of the big things that (Ivanov) needed was games,” Goode said. “I think with goalkeepers, that game experience, it helped him mature and helped him build confidence in himself and then the teammates build confidence in him.”Ivanov is also building a stronger relationship with his teammates, Goode said. The players voted Ivanov as the most improved in the fall.Senior defender Sage Gardner said knowing Ivanov is behind him is a “breath of fresh air” and said the goalkeeper’s leadership and confidence has helped the team.“It’s nice to know that you have someone back there who is always going to cover you,” Gardner said. “The leadership and organization back there from him has been good for the team.”Currently, Ivanov is leading the Big Ten Conference in total saves with 55, 19 more than second place Michigan redshirt-junior goalkeeper Adam Grinwis. He also has three shutouts for the team this year.Daily improvements from practice are a focus for the Buckeye goalkeeper.“I’m always looking for stuff that I do in games that I need to improve on and I try and get something out of practice every day,” he said. “I think that will spread to all of the defenders and we will all get better as a unit as the season progresses.”Ivanov attributes most of his success to the team’s defense but also to his grandfather’s necklace, which he wears every night before a game.“I have this little good-luck charm that I wear, it’s my grandpa’s necklace that I got,” he said. “It’s like this golden nugget and I have to wear it every night before I go to sleep before a game.”One of the biggest improvements in Ivanov’s game this year has been his confidence. Coach John Bluem said Ivanov believes in himself more than last year and that comes from support of those around him, but also that he has a greater belief in his own abilities.Bluem also said having a more than capable backup in junior Andrian McAdams has helped Ivanov this year.“Andrian trains really hard and really pushes himself in training and that makes (Ivanov) push himself as well,” he said. “(Ivanov) knows if he slips up and has a few bad games that we’re probably going to give McAdams a chance. That kind of pressure and that kind of somebody in training that works hard helps keep you ready.”Earlier this season, in a match against Wright State, Ivanov was shown a red card for an intentional handball outside of the box, forcing him to miss the following match versus Dayton and giving McAdams the start.Bluem said instead of getting down on himself, Ivanov helped the backup goalkeeper prepare for the game.“He handled it well. He was at training and working hard like always, but now his role on the team is a little different,” Bluem said, “but his role for himself never changes. He comes and he gives 100 percent of himself to the team and he encouraged Andrian and helped Andrian get prepared so we were able to handle the goalkeeping duties successfully.”This kind of effort and care for the team has led Bluem to look at Ivanov as a leader of the team.“He is a leader,” Bluem said. “This is his fourth year here now and the other day at Akron when they scored the early goal against us, he’s the guy who called the players in and calmed everybody down and got the guys moving forward again.”Ivanov and the Buckeyes have an overall record of 2-5-2, 0-1-0 in conference. The team is scheduled to host No. 18 Louisville Wednesday at 7 p.m., before rival Michigan comes to town Sunday. read more

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Ohio States Aaron Craft named finalist for 2014 Bob Cousy Award

Senior guard Aaron Craft (4) drives to the basket during a game against Morgan State Nov. 9 at the Schottenstein Center. OSU won, 89-50.Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorAaron Craft’s play is getting recognized on and off the court.Ohio State men’s basketball’s all-time leader in steals and assists has been named one of 23 finalists for the 2014 Bob Cousy Award, given to the nation’s best point guard.“The 23 athletes on this list represent the most committed, determined and skillful points guards in college basketball,” President and CEO of the Basketball Hall of Fame, John L. Doleva said according to a press release. “We are honored to be recognizing their strengths and are excited to move forward in the selection process.”So far this season, Craft has started all 26 games and led OSU to a 20-6 overall record with five games remaining in the regular season. He also leads the team in assists (4.6), steals (2.5) and minutes (34.5) per game and is third on the team with an average 9.5 points per game.The senior point guard is also a two-time Academic All-American and the 2012 Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year. Earlier this season, Craft and backcourt partner senior guard Lenzelle Smith Jr. became the fastest players to reach 100 wins in their OSU careers after the Buckeyes defeated North Florida, 99-64, Nov. 29.“The men on this list all have the athletic qualities of an exceptional true point guard in the game of college basketball, the same qualities that made Mr. Cousy an iconic player,” Chair of the Bob Cousy Award, Ken Kaufman said according to the release. “All of these young men are on this list because they deserve to be competing or this well-respected award.”If Craft wins the award, he would be the first Buckeye to win it and third Big Ten player to raise the trophy, with Illinois’ Dee Brown claiming the honor in 2006 and Michigan’s Trey Burke winning it in 2013.Craft looks to add to his résumé in OSU’s next game, scheduled for Wednesday against Northwestern. Game time is set for 7 p.m. at the Schottenstein Center. read more

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Ohio State mens hockey coach Steve Rohlik reflects on 1st year

OSU hockey coach Steve Rohlik (back) talks to his team during a game against Michigan March 2 at Nationwide Arena. OSU lost, 4-3.Credit: Ben Jackson / For The LanternFor being such long endeavors, it’s odd that sports seasons are supposedly defined by their end results. It makes more sense to take a more holistic approach and look at the big picture — at the sum of all those little moments that go unnoticed.An event that was noticed was the 2014 Big Ten Hockey Tournament Championship in St. Paul, Minn. The first season of Big Ten hockey came down to one final game between Ohio State and Wisconsin, where the Buckeyes led 4-2 with less than seven minutes left March 22.The man behind OSU’s bench was Steve Rohlik. An associate head coach for three years with the Buckeyes, the 2013-14 season was Rohlik’s first in the top job. He had led his team through an 0-3 start and a goaltending reshuffle to bring the team within striking distance of its first NCAA Tournament appearance in five years.His seemingly calm demeanor didn’t reveal the tension of the encounter, nor his own personal details that made the situation more compelling — this was not only a game in his hometown, but it was also against his alma mater. The script almost writes itself.But, without warning, that script disappeared. The line between success and failure — one the Buckeyes had toed all season long in their 18-14-5 campaign — became clear. The Badgers scored twice in 28 seconds during the third period to tie the game, and less than eight minutes into the overtime period, Wisconsin was the Big Ten champion.“I couldn’t have asked much more from our guys. They laid it on the line,” Rohlik said last week. “Ultimately I think we were 6:52 short of doing something pretty darn special for this university, for the alumni here, and for this program.”That wasn’t the whole story, though. Instead, it was simply the end of the journey for a team and a coach that stressed the small things, and few could’ve imagined the Buckeyes would finish where they did after the upheaval of the previous spring.Before Rohlik stepped into his new role, Mark Osiecki was fired just over three weeks after the end of the 2012-13 season because of what athletic director Gene Smith called in a press release “a difference of opinion over the management of the program that could not be resolved.”It was Osiecki, Rohlik’s teammate at the University of Wisconsin, who brought him to Columbus as an associate head coach. Rohlik was named coach on an interim basis the day after Osiecki was let go, and then about a week later, was confirmed as the ninth head coach in program history.“I’m truly honored, humbled and very blessed,” Rohlik said at his introductory press conference April 24, 2013. “When I sat down with the administration, and they told me the support they had moving into the Big Ten, I knew this was the place I wanted to be.”Despite being an assistant coach for 16 years, Rohlik displayed leadership qualities at a young age. Captain at both Hill-Murray High School in St. Paul, Minn., and the University of Wisconsin, he had loads of experience in leading hockey players.“From a young age, I was a captain of every team I’ve ever been on. In high school, in every sport I was a captain, my buddies called me ‘the captain.’” Rohlik said. “It was just in my blood. I love to put my neck out there, I love to try to do things the right way, and I love to give it 110 percent and do whatever it takes to help the team win.”Just like leadership, hockey was also in Rohlik’s blood. Growing up in the “land of 10,000 lakes,” he said there was always a pond to skate on, and Rohlik described the sport as “a way of life.”The dream for most kids was to play in the Minnesota state championship game. Rohlik played in two.From there, he crossed the state line and attended the University of Wisconsin, captaining the Badgers in his junior and senior seasons, with his final campaign culminating in the 1990 NCAA Championship.“I might’ve been the guy with the ‘C’ on his sweater, but we had so many great leaders, and all the hard work kind of accumulated to our senior year,” Rohlik said. “To win the (Western Collegiate Hockey Association), to win the WCHA playoffs, and then to win the NCAA Tournament … you can’t write a book any better than that year.”Rohlik had a short stint as a professional before returning to his alma mater, Hill-Murray, as coach at the age of 23. Growing up, Rohlik’s father served the school in administrative position, so he said his dream was to play at Hill-Murray, making his appointment as coach even more meaningful.Five seasons in St. Paul were followed by Division I assistant coaching jobs at Nebraska-Omaha and Minnesota-Duluth. Then in 2010, Rohlik got the call from Osiecki, and in just three years he’d become the coach.“I think I’ve tried to take everything over my experiences as a player for so many years and as a coach for so many years. I just try to compile all those experiences,” Rohlik said. “Throughout all those years, you continue to ask yourself, ‘what would you do in that situation?’ I try to put myself in that spot, and ultimately when you get called upon (to be head coach), you try to surround yourself with good people.”One of those people is associate head coach Brett Larson, a man Rohlik got to know at Minnesota-Duluth, and who Rohlik brought to OSU upon his appointment last year. Larson said Rohlik’s passion coupled his with genuine nature makes him a natural fit for a coach.“The players can see how much he cares, how passionate he is. He wants to push everything to the next level,” Larson said. “It’s a great part of our culture, and you always say that the head coach leads the culture of a program. Being so passionate and so genuine are two things that make the players really want to play hard for him.”The switch in coaching might have been tricky, but junior forward Tanner Fritz — who played under Rohlik as an assistant for two years — said the familiarity was actually beneficial.“When he was the assistant coach, he was always the guy in the room after practice talking to the guys. He still does that — he’s a great player coach,” Fritz said. “He’s very involved in the team. I think he’s tight with every one of us. It’s good to have a coach that’s approachable and can talk to you outside of hockey.”Besides his management skills and personability, Rohlik wants to instill in his players that passion Larson and so many others see clearly in him. Judging by what players like Fritz have to say about it, he seems to have succeeded.“His passion for the game is — bar none — one of the best I’ve ever seen. The guy loves the game, he loves being at the rink,” Fritz said. “(The players) feed off that energy. We’re hard-working and we play with a lot of passion, and that comes from the coaching staff.”That might not have come through at first, however. Three consecutive losses to start the season, an injury to freshman goalie Matt Tomkins and another goalie, then-sophomore Collin Olson, leaving the program in November threatened to derail the entire season.But things changed with the addition of freshman goalie Christian Frey in net and the competitiveness of the Big Ten conference. Each game seemed to bring out the best in the Buckeyes as they finished fourth, behind three top-20 squads.Freshman forward Nick Schilkey, who was named to the Big Ten All-Freshman Team, said the coaching philosophy of Rohlik and his staff was a big factor in righting the ship.“He focuses on a lot of details. We focused all year on sticking together and sticking to the gameplan the coaches had set in place,” Schilkey said. “Over time, we grew into that gameplan and it showed during the second half of the year.”Those details came together in many instances, including the upset of then-No. 1 Minnesota in the Big Ten Tournament semifinal. Even if the season could be considered a success though, Rohlik knows there’s more to come from this team and this program.“Were we satisfied at the end? Absolutely not. Were we satisfied with where we were at in the league? Absolutely not,” Rohlik said. “There’s certainly always room for improvement, and we know we’ve got a long way to go.”And though he’s building a program, Rohlik sees his job as much more than that.He cites the examples of junior forward Ryan Dzingel and senior forward Alex Lippincott as proof of what the sport’s biggest impact can be. Dzingel just signed a professional contract with the Ottawa Senators of the NHL, while Lippincott recently got his first job as graduation approaches.“You see the power of what Ohio State can (do), be it moving on with the hockey or moving on because of the academic side of things,” Rohlik said. “I think that makes it pretty special for us to be involved with.”Now, with one season under his belt, Rohlik is aiming to make things even more special around the OSU hockey program.If he continues to get some of those little details right, it’d be hard to overestimate how far he can take it. read more

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