Tesla Model 3 finally gets Qi wireless charging

first_img More From Roadshow Tesla Model 3 barrels through the snow in Track Mode 1 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better 50 Photos If you’re a Model 3 owner who’s been lamenting the sad state of charging in your car, having to go through the positively draconian process of plugging your car in to juice it up while driving, we have good news for you: Tesla has finally released a wireless upgrade for the Model 3. As noted over at Engadget and Electrek, the new component recently appeared on Tesla’s site. Interestingly, this isn’t the first wireless charger from Tesla. The company also sells a standalone Qi-enabled pad and power pack — but that one isn’t designed to integrate into its cars.  This new one is. It’s a $125 accessory that slots in the center console of the Model 3 and can charge two Qi-enabled phones, such as the new iPhone XR or the Galaxy S10, at the same time. The price tag makes it roughly two times as expensive as some third-party wireless charging pads that have hit the market since the Model 3’s release. This one on Amazon can also charge two phones at once:Bordan Model 3 wireless chargerThere’s still no word on when or if you’ll actually be able to wirelessly charge your Tesla itself, so for now you’re going to have to stick with the aftermarket.  Share your voice Tags Comment 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value Tesla Auto Tech Electric Carslast_img read more

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Nissan and Mobileye are teaming up on ProPilot 20

first_img Intel Nissan Nissan Now playing: Watch this: Post a comment 26 Photos 2:57 2020 Nissan Versa first drive: 15% more price, 100% more car Enlarge ImageProPilot 2.0 allows for hands-free driving on the highway and that ability is powered by Mobileye’s EyeQ4 SOC. Nissan Nissan’s ProPilot Assist was one of the first super-advanced driver-aid suites to be made widely available in an affordable car. It worked well when we tested it, and we were pretty excited when Nissan announced it was working on a Version 2.0.Now we know that Nissan’s not doing Version 2.0 by itself, and that has us even more excited — because it’s working with Intel’s Mobileye to power its hands-off freeway driving feature. Mobileye confirmed the partnership, along with a similar partnership with China’s NIO on Thursday.Specifically, Mobileye’s EyeQ4 system-on-a-chip will be employed by both Nissan and NIO to do some of the computational heavy lifting on the complicated task of safely allowing hands-off, navigated highway driving. Nissan’s version gets a further boost, thanks to Mobileye’s RoadBook system.RoadBook is unique in that it uses aggregated data from vehicles around the world and across a range of manufacturers (so long as they’re equipped with an EyeQ4 system, which Mobileye estimates will be around 20 million vehicles in the next few years) to create high-definition maps for use in self-driving. Nissan will be the first manufacturer to employ the system en masse.Mobileye and Nissan already worked together on a project in 2018 to map all 15,000 miles of Japan’s expressways using an earlier version of RoadBook, and because the maps are being continuously updated and added to in almost real-time, these maps can be used in the development of autonomous vehicles. 2019 Nissan Leaf Plus review: A better EV, but maybe not the best Originally publsihed Aug. 22.Update, Aug. 23: Removes a quote from Mobileye’s CEO at Mobileye’s request.center_img Take an assisted ride with Nissan ProPilot tech on 2018… 2019 Nissan Murano review: Freshened, but not fresh enough 0 Share your voice Tags Intel Mobileye’s autonomous cars in Jerusalem Auto Tech Autonomous Vehicles More From Roadshowlast_img read more

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Rohingya safety citizenship important before repatriation

first_imgRohingya refugees walk at Jamtoli camp in the morning in Cox`s Bazar on 22 January 2018. — ReutersThe UN refugee agency and other groups have urged a rethink of a plan to send Muslim Rohingya refugees back to Myanmar amid fears of forced repatriations without safeguards such as guaranteed citizenship after they fled to Bangladesh to escape bloodshed at home.The calls come as Bangladesh delayed the repatriation of the largely stateless Rohingya to Myanmar that was set to begin on Tuesday, as the process of compiling and verifying the list of people to be sent back was incomplete.“In order for the repatriation to be (done) right, to be sustainable, actually viable…you need to really address a number of issues that for the time being we have heard nothing about,” UNHCR head Filippo Grandi said in Geneva, noting that issues like citizenship had not been addressed.More than 655,500 Muslim Rohingya fled to Bangladesh last year after the Myanmar military cracked down in the northern part of Rakhine state, amid witness reports of killings, looting and rape, in response to militant attacks on security forces on 25 August last year.Many people in Buddhist-majority Myanmar regard the Rohingya as illegal immigrants from Bangladesh. The United Nations described Myanmar’s crackdown as ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya, which Myanmar denies.Grandi said it was important to set up a monitoring mechanism in Myanmar’s Rakhine state for those returning and noted that UNHCR currently did not have the ability to move freely and perform this role there.Myanmar and Bangladesh agreed earlier this month to complete a voluntary repatriation of the refugees in two years. Myanmar says it has set up two reception centres and a temporary camp near the border in Rakhine state to receive the first arrivals.Human Rights Watch, a non-government organization, said on Tuesday that Bangladesh should suspend the plan entirely as it “threatens the refugees’ security and well-being.”The plan has sparked fears in refugee camps in Bangladesh that people may be forced to return despite a lack of guarantees around their security.One Rohingya man detained on Monday by the Bangladeshi military at the Palong Khali refugee camp following a protest against repatriations remained in police custody on Tuesday and was still being interrogated, officials said.“He was detained for instigating violence. He is in custody for interrogation,” local police chief Abul Khayer told Reuters by telephone.A UNHCR official said the agency plans to bring up the detention with Bangladesh during their next meeting, as the refugees were only staging a peaceful protest.Meanwhile, another Reuters report from Geneva says: More time is needed to prepare the return of Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh to northern Rakhine state in Myanmar, the UN refugee chief said on Monday, after a Bangladeshi official said the plan to begin on Tuesday had been delayed.“In order for the repatriation to be right, sustainable, actually viable, you need to really to address a number of issues that for the time being we have heard nothing about, including the citizenship issue, the rights of the Rohingya in Rakhine state, meaning freedom of movement, access to services, to livelihoods,” Filippo Grandi told Reuters.last_img
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Democracy net tax crisis get Hungarians to protest

first_imgIt was by far the largest protest since his center-right government took power in 2010 and pursued moves to redefine many walks of life, drawing accusations of creeping authoritarianism, although it was re-elected by a landslide this year. Orban’s government has imposed special taxes on the banking, retail, energy and telecommunications sectors to keep the budget deficit in check, jeopardizing profits in some parts of the economy and unnerving international investors. The internet data levy idea was first floated in the 2015 tax code submitted to the Central European country’s parliament last week, triggering objections from internet service providers and users who felt it was anti-democratic. The crowd, which was organized by a Facebook-based social network and appeared to draw mostly well-heeled professionals, marched through central Budapest demanding the repeal of the planned tax and the ouster of Orban. Many protesters held up makeshift signs that read ‘ERROR!’ and ‘How many times do you want to skin us?’ Zsolt Varady, an internet entrepreneur and founder of a now-defunct Hungarian social network iwiw.hu, told the crowd that the tax threatened to undermine internet freedoms. ‘Between 2006 and 2006 iwiw motivated many people to get an internet subscription,’ Varady said. ‘People were willing to pay for the service because they knew, saw and felt that their lives were becoming better… The internet tax threatens the further growth of the Internet as well as freedom of information.’ Tax reduced after first protest. The government had planned to tax internet data transfers at a rate of 150 forints per gigabyte. After analysts calculated this would total more than the sector’s annual revenue and an initial protest drew thousands on Sunday, Fidesz submitted a bill that capped the tax at 700 forints per month for individuals and 5,000 forints for companies. That did not placate Tuesday’s protesters. ‘I am a student, my parents are not well off, neither am I, so I work hard,’ said Ildiko Pirk, a 22-year-old studying nursing. ‘I doubt the internet companies won’t build this tax into their prices. And I have a computer, a smartphone, as does my mother and my four siblings… That adds up.’ She said the internet was vital for her to get the books she needs for her studies but also to read unbiased news that is not under the control of Hungary’s ruling political elite. She and other protesters said the government’s other moves also bothered them, such as a perceived mismanagement of the economy and a recent dispute with the United States over alleged corruption of Hungarian public officials. The Orban government denied any anti-democratic agenda, saying it aimed only to get all economic sectors to share the tax burden and was tapping into a trend of telecommunications shifting away from already-taxed telephony and text messages.last_img read more

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Rep Wendzel takes ceremonial oath of office on House floor

first_img09Jan Rep. Wendzel takes ceremonial oath of office on House floor Categories: Wendzel News FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Joyce and Brad Wendzel (parents), Supreme Court Chief Justice Stephen Markman, Alton and Mildred Wendzel (grandparents), Rep. Pauline Wendzel and Nicholas Scalise.PHOTO INFORMATION: State Rep. Pauline Wendzel, of Watervliet, was joined by her family as she was sworn in today at the state Capitol for her first term as state Representative for the 79th House District. Administering the oath of office on the House Floor was Michigan Supreme Court Justice Stephen Markman.###last_img

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