UBM TechWeb Buys Online Marketing Summit

first_imgWhile the 2011 OMS event generated about $1.1 million in revenues, the value of its gross assets at time of acquisition were about $200,000. UBM says it expects to exceed the cost of capital of the deal in its first full year of ownership.On the surface, the summit is a good fit with TechWeb, given the group’s push into marketing-as-a-service. TechWeb’s audience consists mostly of CIOs and IT executives and managers. InformationWeek and Interop are two core brands, but the group also produces the Black Hat event, among many others, and information and event brands in the telecommunication and gaming markets.But TechWeb’s marketing services group could leverage OMS as a brand for its digital marketing clients who use TechWeb as a provider of integrated marketing services to reach its audience. According to TechWeb CEO Tony Uphoff, OMS could provide some integration opportunities with the group’s other events, especially overseas. “Our mission at UBM TechWeb is about all things technology,” says Uphoff. “We see marketing as the next big tech frontier. The acquisition of Online Marketing Summit is the perfect addition to other successful UBM properties, and we’re hoping to integrate with these brands like Technology for Marketing and Advertising (TFM&A) in India, China and the UK, Internet World in the UK, and E-Commerce Expo in the UK. Finally, Online Marketing Summit perfectly complements our Marketing-as-a-Service business. Online Marketing Summit’s deep education, world class library of online tutorial, and a first time show floor delivers on all principles of Marketing-as-a-Service, fusing quality content, engaged audiences, user experience, and business analytics with the latest digital technologies to cost-effectively deliver sustainable marketing programs.” UBM TechWeb has acquired the Online Marketing Summit. The event, with its next edition taking place early February in San Diego, attracts approximately 1,500 attendees and generates about $1.1 million in revenues.The Online Marketing Summit grew out of the Online Marketing Institute, an organization providing training and certification programs for the various permutations of online marketing-email, social media, SEO, demand generation, and so on. The summit, the OMI’s main event, launched in 2007.OMS co-founder Aaron Kahlow will continue on as conference director and the Online Marketing Institute will remain an independent organization.”With UBM TechWeb, the Online Marketing Summit will grow to serve our audiences with an even more world class content, deep educatioal workshops and a first ever Expo showcasing the hottest new tools and solutions,” Kahlow says in a prepared statement. last_img read more

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OBITUARY Jay Traynor 63

first_imgTEWKSBURY, MA — Jay Traynor, 63 years old of Tewksbury, MA, died peacefully at home with his beloved family by his side. Throughout his short battle with cancer, he maintained a positive outlook and never lost his sense of humor.Jay was the devoted husband of Denise for 37 years, childhood sweethearts who met when they were just 14 years old in Woburn, MA. They moved to Tewksbury to start their family, bringing two sons into the world, James E. and Ryan D.His children were the love of Jay’s life. He was the coach for Jimmy and Ryan’s soccer, baseball and football teams, as well as the Cubmaster of Pack 49. He taught them about his love for fishing, hunting and camping, and passed on his passion for music, horror movies and motorcycles.There wasn’t a person Jay met who he did not call a friend, and remained close with childhood friends for over 50 years. One of Jay’s favorite activities was fishing at Plum Island with his dear friend, Mike Winn. Tony Ciampa was his first friend when he moved to Woburn from Medford. He met Sam Petricone, Jack Lynch, John Albano, John Swain, KC Hayes, Victor Minghella, Joe Ciccarelli, Bob Miguel, Bob Mearls, Jeff Holt and Brian Doyle soon after, and became lifelong friends/brothers. Through his sons, Jay also created new friends, Charlie Webber and Tim Dooley, who he loved dearly as well. Every one of Jay’s friends were alongside him every step of the way during this terrible time, and for that we are extremely grateful.Jay worked at H.B. Fuller for 20 years and devoted his spare time to community service, working on upgrading homes of the elderly in Wilmington and with the House of Hope in Lowell. He also worked at Wonder Bread, and at the Blaire House in Tewksbury. His compassion for the elderly came from the close relationship he had with his grandparents.Jay was preceded in death by his father, James (Jimmy), his mother, Janet, and his grandparents Eddie and Ann. He is survived by his wife, Denise, his son, James, his son and daughter-in-law, Ryan and Korinne, his sister, Marybeth, his brother, Paul, and several cousins, nieces and nephews. He also had a very special bond with his nephew Jason Fogg.“At the end of your life, you will never regret not passing one more test, reaching one more verdict, closing one more deal. You will regret not spending time with your wife/husband, your children or a friend.” Barbara Bush.Calling hours are Thursday, March 21, from 4-8 p.m. at the Farmer & Dee Funeral Home, 16 Lee St., Tewksbury. His funeral procession will begin at 10:30 a.m. on Friday, March 22, at the funeral home, followed by his Funeral Mass at 11:30 a.m. at St. William’s Church, 1351 Main St., Rte. 38, Tewksbury. In lieu of flowers, donations in his memory may be made on line to Pug Rescue of New England, http://www.pugrescueofnewengland.org or mailed to P.O. Box 441667, West Somerville, MA 02644.Jay Traynor(NOTE: The above obituary is from Farmer & Dee Funeral Home.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedOBITUARY: Donald R. Donahue, 80In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: William J. “Bill” Wolfe, 75In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Robert “Bob” Alan Coste, 59In “Obituaries”last_img read more

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Foldable phone maker shows off flexible keyboard at CES 2019

first_img Now playing: Watch this: 0 Royole’s flexible keyboard. Sarah Tew/CNET Even before arriving at CES 2019, Royole made headlines in November when it launched the FlexPai — a 7.8-inch phone with a flexible AMOLED screen — during a time when Samsung was only rumored to do the same.It was hard to imagine that this largely unknown startup managed to make, let alone sell, such a product before Samsung and other giants like LG and Huawei were able to debut their own. (Samsung did eventually give a sneak peak of its foldable phone a month later.) 1:44 $1,318 Mentioned Above Royole FlexPai 14 Photos Gadgets Share your voice Tags See it Riding the hype of that launch, Royole is at CES 2019 showing off not only the FlexPai but several other devices that implement thin, foldable displays. Namely, a smart speaker, a flexible keyboard and a smart-touch selfie stick.The smart speaker has a 7.8-inch AMOLED touchscreen that bends at 100 degrees. You can swipe through the screen to play music, watch movies or just tap the interactive home screen.Though it wasn’t set up while we were taking a look at it, the speaker also has an 8-megapixel camera up top that pops up and rotates 180 degrees for taking pictures and video calls. The speaker is also integrated with Alexa and Google, so you can ask it different queries and command it to control your smart home devices. Royole’s Flexpai phone and flexible keyboard rolls into your pocket CES Products Amazon Google LG Samsung CES 2019: Royole demos all the quirky stuff its flexible… CES 2019 CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Royole demoed its flexible QWERTY keyboard as well, which can be laid on any smooth surface and connected to your phone via Bluetooth. It can work wirelessly and when you’re done, push the button twice and it’ll roll up so you can carry it around in your pocket. On standby I’m told its battery lasts for months. Though it was a little hard to type on, it looks really cool and the transparent surface is thin and flexible.  04-smart-speaker-flexible-screenRoyole’s smart speaker has a curved touchscreen. Sarah Tew/CNET Lastly, the company showed off its smart-touch selfie stick. It’s already available in China at Brookstone stores, and is expected to come to the US in 2019. It features multi-touch sensors around the handle. This allows you to navigate through a dedicated camera app so you can switch between different editing features on the phone.Official pricing has not been announced yet, but Royole plans to sell the flexible keyboard globally by Q2 2019 through its site and other retailers like Amazon. As for the smart speaker, Royole is still reaching out to retail partners for distribution.Royole also brought along two other devices that are already available on its site and Amazon: the digital writing pad RoWrite and an immersive 3D movie headset called Moon. They retail for $130 (£102 and AU$183, converted) and $600 (£471 and AU$842), respectively.CES 2019: See all of CNET’s coverage of the year’s biggest tech show.CES schedule: It’s six days of jam-packed events. Here’s what to expect. Royole FlexPai Preview • Royole FlexPai: First foldable phone beats Samsung to the punch Post a commentlast_img read more

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What Would a Dog Do on Mars

first_imgRecently, NASA released colorful, dreamy illustrations depicting an imagined future in which human beings have made it to other worlds. A curly-haired astronaut floats inside a lunar space station, with the crater-pocked moon behind her. A lunar explorer steadies a camera on a tripod to photograph Earth in the distance. And an astronaut stands on the dunes of Mars with her hands in the pockets of her spacesuit, a dog at her side. But dogs have been to space. In the 1950s and 1960s, the Soviet Union strapped dogs into capsules and launched them into the sky. The canines were not trusty space sidekicks, but research subjects, strays collected from city streets to test launch systems before humans themselves did. (The United States conducted similar tests, with several species of monkeys.) Read the whole story: The Atlantic Wait, a dog?center_img To be clear, NASA’s ambitious plans for missions to the moon and Mars do not include dogs. (At least, none that the public knows about. If you’re a member of a top-secret program to groom doggonauts, please contact me.) The agency does want to send humans there, sometime in the 2030s.last_img read more

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