Green House Project Featured on NPR

first_imgby, Kavan Peterson, Editor, ChangingAging.orgTweetShareShareEmail0 Shareselder-woman-in-chair-in-bedroom-1024x926.pdfI just had the pleasant surprise of learning that Dr. Bill Thomas would be featured on NPR’s All Things Considered tonight discussing The Green House Project. I learned this thanks to a tweet from ChangingAging Blogstream member Martha Stettinius (@InsideDementia) when I regained cell reception after a two hour drive through canyon country to Grand Junction, Colo.It still amazes me how quickly the ChangingAging community has grown and how incredible it is to rely on far-flung members to keep up to date on important news. Thanks Martha!I’m blogging via iPhone at The Denver airport so I’ll borrow Martha’s post from this morning:I just heard on the radio that Dr. Bill Thomas of The Green House Project will be interviewed on NPR’s All Things Considered TODAY at 5 p.m. ET. Those of you who have read my book know that I think highly of the Green House Project, a radical alternative to conventional nursing home care. Only a few of us are lucky enough to have one nearby, but more and more Green Houses are being built across the country.Listen to his interview today, or download the recording from the NPR website after today: http://www.npr.org/templates/rundowns/rundown.php?prgId=2Related PostsThe Apple of Long Term CareIf McKnight’s Long Term Care News thinks The Green House Project is the Apple of aging services, let me introduce you to the “Steve Wosniak” of the Green House.Doc Thomas kicks-off new NPR series on “What Works”Tune-in to NPR’s Talk of the Nation with Neal Conan this Thursday, April 2, to hear Bill Thomas interviewed in the first of a new series on “What Works.” Dr. Bill Thomas graduated from medical school passionate about emergency medicine. He was a “real” doctor, working long hours in an…’Green House’ Communities Reinvent Elder CareTweetShareShareEmail0 SharesTags: green house project NPR nursing homelast_img read more

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Going GreenHouse

first_imgby, Virgil Thomas, ChangingAging.orgTweetShareShareEmail0 SharesTGHP_10thAnni_Horizontal_Color_1Do UStream? You should.Look for us at the 6th Annual Green House Meeting and Celebration in Boston, MA November 18-20th. If you can’t make the conference don’t panic because we will be going UStream crazy. Check out the schedule to see if there is anything you just can’t miss.11/19:8:30-10:00a Welcome and 10 Years Strong, The Origin Story10:45-11:45  Short Term Rehabilitation in The Green House home1:30 – 2:15 pm Elders Rule Panel Discussion3:30 pm – 5:00 pm QAPI, 5 Star Ratings and Understanding Quality: Using the Team in the Home to Drive Process Improvement11/208:30-10:00a Dr Al Power: The Person Comes First , Best Practices around Serving People Living with Dementia10:15-11:45a Chris Perna, CEO of The Eden Alternative: Life, Liberty and Pursuit of Well-being3:00-4:00p Nancy Fox, Leadership: Dealing in HopeYou might notice that there are some of The Eden Alternative’s all-time greats on that schedule.Dr. Al Power, Certified Eden Alternative Educator and Mentor and a member of the Eden Alternative board of directors, is giving the opening plenary during the second day, “The Person Comes First- Best Practices around Serving People Living with Dementia.” Chris Perna, the CEO of The Eden Alternative, will be discussing the Domains of Well-being in his segment “Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Well-being. Nancy Fox, Certified Eden Alternative Educator and Mentor and the former Executive Director of Eden Alternative, is the closing plenary speaker.Though she is not on the list we have to give a shout-out to Rebecca Priest, an Eden Alternative Mentor and Registry Member from St. John’s Living. She will conduct an Education session on the second day entitled, “Convivium!”This event is something we encourage you to watch. When this many wise, passionate people from around the world of culture change meet, an experience like no other is created.Related PostsTweetShareShareEmail0 SharesTags: al power convivium Dementia Innovation Nancy Fox The Eden Alternative THE GREEN HOUSE Project well beinglast_img read more

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Thanks Thankfulness Thanksgiving

first_imgby, Meredith BurrusTweetShareShareEmail0 SharesThe month of November brings many joyous gifts and days to celebrate. Halloween graces us (or plagued us) with a week of leftover candy. We “fall back” an hour to give us some extra sleep and brighter, lighter mornings (all the better to celebrate my birthday). Veteran’s Day offers us an opportunity to honor and thank our Veterans. Thanksgiving is a time of reconnecting with loved ones to celebrate and share the year’s prosperity and abundance and it’s also a day to share our gratitude and give thanks for our many blessings.I remember, when I was a child in grade school, writing the infamous “I am thankful for” statement every year.  Years later, I have grow into new perspectives. Now my “I am thankful for” list no longer comes just with the changing of the leaves, but each and every day.For the next 3 weeks, we are inviting you to join in on the conversation by posting what you are thankful for in this season using the hashtag  #28DaysOfThanks either by commenting on the blog or posting on twitter or facebook .  We look forward to hearing from you.  In fact, I’ll get it started…I am thankful for Thanksmas.  My family gathers at the Ponderosa in Humboldt, Tennessee, the Saturday after Thanksgiving each year with all of my mother’s family for a day of food, family and lots of loud belly laughs!  We set aside this day years ago for the Warmath side of our family to gather because as we each grow and add to our families, it became harder and harder to all be together on the traditional holiday.  So, we created a day of our own…a day we call Thanksmas!Related PostsHappy Thanksgiving — Then and NowIf I remember correctly (always doubtful these days), that’s Norman Rockwell peeking out at us from the bottom right of his famous painting.  Here’s one of my favorite Thanksgiving quotes: I celebrated Thanksgiving in an old-fashio…Blanchard WinsDaysDaily Dose of InspirationChangingAging reader Guest asks for a little dose of inspiration: I am the caregiver for my 93 year old Mother. I am 54.  I am the youngest of four children.  My oldest sibling died three years ago.  Most of the family and extended family live in the same small town…TweetShareShareEmail0 SharesTags: ChangingAging convivium events fall family Thanksgiving The Eden Alternativelast_img read more

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Centrosome amplification may contribute to initiation of cancers research suggests

first_imgMay 8 2018Cells begin to accumulate centrosomes-;organelles that play a vital role during cell division-;before they transform into cancer cells, according to a new study of patients with Barrett’s esophagus condition, which is associated with esophageal cancer. The research, which will be published May 8 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that similar cases of centrosome amplification may contribute to the initiation and progression of a variety of human cancers.Centrosomes play crucial roles in a wide range of cellular processes by organizing the cell’s microtubule cytoskeleton. Cells usually contain just a single centrosome that they carefully duplicate once per cell cycle so that, when the cell divides, they can organize microtubules into a bipolar spindle that allows each daughter cell to inherit an equal number of chromosomes and a single centrosome of its own. Cells with too many centrosomes usually fail to divide properly and die.Cancer cells often contain excessive numbers of centrosomes, however, and usually survive cell division despite their propensity to form abnormal spindles and missegregate chromosomes. Indeed, the genomic instability created by excess centrosomes may help cancer cells to become more malignant.”Centrosome amplification is found in human tumors but not in normal cells, so it is an appealing feature to explore for diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy,” explains Carla Lopes, from the Instituto Português de Oncologia and Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência in Portugal. “Despite being a cancer hallmark, however, the timing, mechanisms, and impact of centrosome deregulation in human cancer are poorly understood.”Lopes and colleagues, including co-first author Marta Mesquita and co-senior authors Mónica Bettencourt-Dias and Paula Chaves, investigated the role of centrosome amplification in tumorigenesis by examining samples from patients with the premalignant condition Barrett’s esophagus, in which chronic acid reflux causes the epithelial cells lining the esophagus to be replaced by cells usually found only in the stomach and intestine. In a small percentage of patients, these “metaplastic” cells become dysplastic and proliferate abnormally, eventually giving rise to esophageal adenocarcinoma.Related StoriesTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerEmbrace your natural skin tone to prevent skin cancer, say expertsPatients with Barrett’s esophagus therefore undergo regular biopsy screenings, and any dysplastic tissue is removed. This allowed Lopes, Mesquita, and colleagues to investigate how centrosome numbers change at different stages of the disease.”We established a method to identify centrosomes at the single-cell level in clinical samples and found that centrosome number abnormalities arise early in Barrett’s esophagus progression,” Mesquita says.The researchers never saw excess centrosomes in normal esophageal tissue. Nor did they see centrosome amplification in Barrett’s esophagus patients that hadn’t progressed to later stages of the disease. But extra centrosomes could occasionally be seen in the premalignant, metaplastic cells of patients that developed dysplasia or adenocarcinoma. The incidence of centrosome amplification increased dramatically during dysplasia, and cells with excess centrosomes persisted throughout adenocarcinoma and metastasis.The increase in centrosome amplification at the onset of dysplasia coincided with the loss or mutation of the tumor suppressor p53. The most mutated gene in human cancers, p53 is thought to kill cells with too many centrosomes. Lopes, Mesquita, and colleagues found that p53 was activated in metaplastic cells with extra centrosomes and that removing p53 from these cells increased the levels of centrosome amplification.This suggests that centrosome amplification arises in some cells during metaplasia and that p53 prevents these cells from propagating until it is lost during the transition to dysplasia. Cells with extra centrosomes can then survive and proliferate, giving rise to cells with abnormal numbers of chromosomes that can become malignant cancer cells.”Given the widespread occurrence of p53 mutations and centrosome amplification in human tumors, our findings on the timing and ordering of these events in Barrett’s esophagus tumorigenesis are likely applicable to other cancers as well,” Lopes says.​ Source:http://www.rupress.org/last_img read more

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People with type 1 diabetes for decades show signs of mild drop

first_img Source:http://www.joslin.org/news/decades-of-type-1-diabetes-linked-to-mild-drop-in-cognition.html Jun 5 2018People who live with type 1 diabetes for very long duration show signs of mild decreases in cognitive abilities, primarily in memory, compared to those who don’t have the disease, Joslin Diabetes Center researchers have shown.The study compared Joslin 50-year Medalists, who have lived successfully with type 1 diabetes for at least that long, with other people of similar age with type 2 diabetes or without diabetes, says Gail Musen, PhD, an assistant investigator in Joslin’s Research Division. The work is the first to evaluate whether cognitive function is changing in an aging group of people who have successfully managed their type 1 diabetes, a very complex disease associated with many complications, for from 50 to more than 80 years.The mild cognitive declines don’t appear in clinical signs for these Medalists, who remain in the normal range of function for people their age, emphasizes Musen, who is lead author on the paper about the work published in Diabetes Care.Joslin investigators also examined how various measures of cognitive health among these Medalists might correspond to common diabetes complications. Most strikingly, “the memory changes are associated with cardiovascular disease,” says Hillary Keenan, PhD, a former principal investigator on the Medalist study and corresponding author on the paper.The scientists tested and compared cognition in 82 Medalists, 31 age-matched individuals with type 2 diabetes and 30 age-matched non-diabetic controls. Their investigation included standard tests for memory, psychomotor speed and executive function (higher cognitive processes involved in decision-making).The memory tests required participants to recall a list of words immediately after presentation as well as after a 30-minute delay. Performance was significantly but not dramatically lower in people with either form of diabetes than in people lacking the disease. While this has been known for people with type 2 diabetes, the changes in memory in aging people with type 1 diabetes had not been clearly established.Related StoriesDiet and physical exercise do not reduce risk of gestational diabetesMetformin use linked to lower risk of dementia in African Americans with type 2 diabetesMothers with gestational diabetes transferring harmful ‘forever chemicals’ to their fetusIn the psychomotor test, the researchers looked at how quickly and well subjects inserted small key-shaped pegs into similarly shaped slots that have been rotated to require fine motor dexterity. Medalists on average performed slightly worse than those without diabetes. This diminished performance was associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy, an advanced form of eye disease. (However, it didn’t reflect poorer vision, since Medalists wore their corrective lenses.)The executive-function test scored how quickly and accurately participants put scrambled letters and numbers into a given order. Here the Joslin team also saw a tendency of slightly worse results among Medalists than their peers without diabetes.”Overall, nobody among the Medalists needs to worry; this is a very healthy group that’s showing minimal signs of cognitive decline,” Musen stresses. “However, these small deficits may be avoidable with self-care behaviors that help minimize diabetes complications.”Previous research on the Medalists has consistently found that moderate physical exercise is linked to a reduction in cardiovascular disease. The latest findings provide yet another incentive for people with type 1 diabetes to pursue physical exercise, in addition to following general guidelines for healthcare and diabetes management, says Keenan.With the incidence of type 1 diabetes on the rise, Joslin continues to examine the long-term effects of the disease on cognition and other complications, says George King, MD, Joslin’s Chief Scientific Officer and Director of Research Division. “We want to further study this population, to better understand these processes and find therapies to protect against them,” he says. “Since both eye and cardiovascular diseases in diabetic patients are treatable, we are very hopeful the cognitive decline in type 1 diabetes is also preventable.”last_img read more

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Cardiovascular disease patients with internal bleeding more likely to be diagnosed with

first_img Source:https://www.mcmaster.ca/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Aug 27 2018Patients with cardiovascular disease who develop major internal bleeding are much more likely to be diagnosed with cancer, a large international clinical trial has found.Patients with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding are 18 times more likely to be diagnosed with GI tract cancer, and those who major genitourinary (GU) tract bleeding are 80-fold more likely to be diagnosed with GU cancer, than patients without internal GI or GU bleeding, respectively.The study results are part of a presentation today at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Munich, Germany. The clinical trial, called Cardiovascular Outcomes for People Using Anticoagulation Strategies (COMPASS), is led by the Population Health Research Institute (PHRI), a joint institute of McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences (HHS).Related StoriesLiving with advanced breast cancerTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsThe COMPASS study involves more than 27,000 patients with coronary or peripheral artery disease in 33 countries.Previously, COMPASS found that the combination of rivaroxaban combined with aspirin reduces cardiovascular death, stroke or heart attack by 24% compared with aspirin alone. Increased bleeding was an unwanted side effect of the combination of rivaroxaban and aspirin, although there was no significant increase in fatal or critical organ bleeding.The new analyses demonstrate that patients who developed bleeding were more likely to be diagnosed with cancer, particularly when the bleeding occurred in the GI or GU tracts. One in 5 of all new cancer diagnoses during the trial were in patients who had experienced bleeding.”This startling insight should stimulate a search for occult cancers in patients with cardiovascular disease who develop bleeding,” said John Eikelboom, co-principal investigator of COMPASS, an associate professor of medicine at McMaster’s Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine, and a hematologist at HHS.Stuart Connolly, co-principal investigator of the COMPASS trial, added: “Bleeding has become a key focus in cardiovascular disease prevention. Most of our efforts have been focused on discovering better ways to prevent and treat bleeding, but if bleeding allows us to diagnose cancer earlier, it may lead to an unexpected benefit.”last_img read more

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Podcast Sexist thermostats fighting climate change and more

first_imgWhy does weight loss surgery really work? Could sucking carbon dioxide from the air combat climate change? And is the thermostat in your office sexist? Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm chats about these stories and more with Science’s Sarah Crespi. Plus, Andrea Marzi discusses a vaccine that is effective against Ebola in monkeys.last_img

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Dinosaur tail trapped in amber sheds light on evolution of feathers

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Amber is often prized not just for its golden beauty, but also for the tiny creatures it contains, many of them millions of years old. Now, a chunk of this fossilized tree sap found at a market in Myanmar has turned out to contain a very rare treasure indeed: a slender piece of feathered tail that belonged to a small bipedal dinosaur that lived about 99 million years ago.“Since Jurassic Park came out, paleontologists have joked about finding dinosaurs in amber, since it would contain so much extra information. And now we have a piece of one,” says Thomas Holtz, a vertebrate paleontologist at the University of Maryland in College Park who was not involved in the study.Researchers aren’t using ancient blood from the belly of preserved mosquitos to recreate dinosaurs, as in the movies. But the finding does reveal a feathered dinosaur tail in 3D for the first time, and offers a unique glimpse into the early evolution of feathers. Amber is a uniquely useful fossilizer, notes Michael Engel, a paleontologist and entomologist at the University of Kansas in Lawrence who was also not involved in the study. “It preserves things in lifelike fidelity.” Although it’s rare to find larger animals preserved in the sticky flow, researchers have found everything from frogs to lizards to ancient bird wings, likely entombed after death. A feathered dinosaur’s tail, frozen in amber. The amber deposits of northern Myanmar harbor one of the most diverse arrays of animals from the Cretaceous period. Paleontologist Lida Xing of China University of Geosciences in Beijing was hunting through an amber market in Myanmar for lizard and insect specimens when a particular chunk caught his eye: Along with the usual scattering of insects, it contained a 3.6-centimeter-long section of a flexible, finely feathered tail. Right away, he knew he had something special. Royal Saskatchewan Museum (RSM/ R.C. McKellar) Xing contacted paleontologist Ryan McKellar of the Royal Saskatchewan Museum in Regina, Canada, and the team used photographs taken through microscopes and computerized tomography scanning (computer-processed combinations of images taken by x-rays at different angles to reveal interior details of the fossil) to study the eight preserved vertebrae and their feathers.Unlike Archaeopteryx (a 150-million-year-old creature thought by many researchers to be among the very earliest birds) or modern birds, the vertebrae were not fused into a solid rod at the tip of the tail. Instead, the tail in amber is whiplike and flexible, bending in several places at once. That, the researchers report online today in Current Biology, suggests that its owner was not a bird but in fact a dinosaur, and likely a member of a group of small two-legged dinosaurs called coelurosaurs. (Jurassic Park fans, take note: Compsognathus—nicknamed “compys” in the movies—are a member of this group.)Plumage pigments preserved in the amber suggest the theropod was colored chestnut-brown along its dorsal side (the top of the tail), and lighter on its underside. The amber also allowed the researchers to study the structure of the animal’s plumage in 3D. Many well-known feathered dinosaur fossils—such as those of the “Jehol Biota,” a fossil deposit in northeastern China dating to about 130 million years ago—are “squashed flat, so that we have to deconstruct what the original shape of the feathers was,” Holtz says. “Here we can see them in the round, and this gives a better sense of some of the shapes.”The feather of the bird you see out your window today has a central shaft, or “rachis,” that branches out into a series of barbs that branch again into fine barbules. In the new specimen, the rachis is relatively thin and flexible compared with the thick, rigid central rachis of modern birds; however, the structure of barbules is complex, with fine tiers of branching as in modern feathers, distributed evenly across the length of the feathers. In all, the structure of the feathers suggests that the animal wasn’t capable of flight, although “it may have been a glider,” McKellar says.That combination of features—weak rachis and evenly spaced barbules—has not previously been directly observable in the flattened 2D fossils, Holtz says. He agrees that the bird likely couldn’t fly with this configuration—and notes that the discovery thus further reinforces the idea that feathers “evolved in a context other than flight,” such as for warmth or for mating.last_img read more

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Monarch miscalculation Has a scientific error about the butterflies persisted for more

first_img Christopher Hamm By Michael PriceFeb. 24, 2017 , 3:00 AM (Left to right): bushton3/iStockphoto; Fabrice-Chanson/iStockphoto A new study suggests the first published chromosome count for the monarch butterfly (right) was actually based on cells from the similar-looking common tiger butterfly (left). Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Hamm thinks that Rao and Murty, perhaps not knowing about the reclassification, netted bugs they assumed were monarchs but were actually common tiger butterflies. Back in the lab, they performed a technique known as a chromosome squash—squeezing the butterflies’ cells between thin films of glass until individual chromosomes are visible under a microscope—counted to 30, and published the results. Then, in 2004, Brazilian zoologist Keith Brown Jr. cited the work in his own research exploring the evolutionary history of butterflies; he never suspected that Rao and Murty might have been working with a misidentified species. Brown’s paper has been cited a dozen times since, and the idea that monarchs have 30 chromosomes is now well established in the literature.Murty has since died—though his name lives on in a namesake flatworm, Pseudodiplodiscoides murtyi—and Rao could not be located to confirm the theory. Still, it’s a plausible explanation, says Krushnamegh Kunte, a biologist at the National Centre for Biological Sciences in Bengaluru, India, who studies butterfly genetics. “Unfortunately, history has a strong influence in taxonomy,” he says. “Many Indian taxonomists continued to erroneously refer to the Indian populations of Danaus genutia as Danaus plexippus.”Hamm performed his own chromosome squash with six juvenile monarchs—real ones given to him by Kansas-based Monarch Watch, a network of scientists, teachers, and volunteers that supports research on the butterfly. Earlier this month, he reported his count of 28 chromosomes on the bioRxiv preprint server, an online repository where scientists publish work before it has been peer reviewed. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Monarch miscalculation: Has a scientific error about the butterflies persisted for more than 40 years? Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe A few years ago, Christopher Hamm was reading up on monarch butterflies when he noticed something peculiar. All of the scientific articles that mentioned the number of the insect’s chromosomes—30, it seemed—referenced a 2004 paper, which in turn cited a 1975 paper. But when Hamm, then a postdoc at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, did a genetic analysis of his own, he found that his monarchs only had 28 chromosomes, suggesting that an error has pervaded the literature for more than 40 years. Another twist, however, was just around the corner.Hamm suspected a mistake when he read the original 1975 paper. The authors, biologists N. Nageswara Rao and A. S. Murty at Andhra University in Visakhapatnam, India, had studied what they claimed was an Indian monarch butterfly in their work. But there’s a problem: Monarchs are nearly exclusively a North American species. “It’s implied they just went outside their building and collected some butterflies,” Hamm says. “I immediately thought, ‘Monarch butterflies in India? Really?’”Sure monarchs are master travelers, with the longest-known seasonal migration of any insect. And it’s not uncommon for a few to get blown off course to Australia, the Philippines, the United Kingdom, and a handful of other places from time to time. But ending up as far away as India seemed like a stretch. Hamm, now a data scientist at Monsanto in Woodland, California, also knew that taxonomists since Carl Linnaeus have struggled to distinguish species in Lepidoptera, the order of insects to which monarchs belong. For example, the monarch (Danaus plexippus) and a similar-looking butterfly known as the common tiger butterfly (D. genutia) were thought to be the same for more than a century until they were reclassified as separate species in 1954. And guess what: D. genutia lives in India. A zoomed-in view of a monarch butterfly’s chromosomes. Case closed, right? Not quite. A paper published a few days later on bioRxiv by some of Hamm’s former colleagues at the University of Kansas claims to have found, like Rao and Murty, 30 chromosomes in monarchs. “Previously, an observation of N=30 chromosomes was reported only for males (Nageswara-Rao and Murty 1975),” the authors write. “Our current analysis confirms the same chromosome number not only in males but also in females.” The authors of that paper declined to comment on Hamm’s findings.Hamm doubts that he miscounted the chromosomes in six different samples, but he says there’s a chance he and his former colleagues are both right. Lepidoptera genetics is notorious for the fact that chromosome counts can vary between populations of the same species and occasionally even within cells from the same individual, he explains.“I am glad that other researchers are skeptical and want to build on my minor contribution,” Hamm says. “There could be some interesting biology going on.”Kunte admits it won’t exactly shake up the field of monarch research to revise the species’s chromosome count; a few genetic studies might need to be reconsidered.The larger point is that it’s important to correct the historical record, says Akito Kawahara, a butterfly researcher at the Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville. The work underscores a common complaint that all too often in genetic research, taxonomists are left out of the equation, he says. As a result, genetic studies are vulnerable to species misidentifications like this one.“These kinds of things do happen with closely related species,” he says. “Twenty-eight versus 30 chromosomes doesn’t really have any impact on the conservation of the species or our understanding of it, but the next time someone makes a mistake like this, it could be with something important.”last_img read more

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Top stories the appendixs secret seeds earthquake warnings and a halted heart

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country (left to right): B. A. KILLINGER ET AL. SCIENCE TRANSLATIONAL MEDICINE (2018); ROBERTO CIGNA; SPL/SCIENCE SOURCE Top stories: the appendix’s secret seeds, earthquake warnings, and a halted heart repair trial Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Frankie SchembriNov. 2, 2018 , 3:50 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Seeds of Parkinson’s disease may hide in the appendixWe tend to ignore the appendix unless it gets inflamed and needs cutting out. But a new study suggests this enigmatic organ in the gut harbors a supply of a brain-damaging protein involved in Parkinson’s disease—even in healthy people. The study is the largest yet to find that an appendectomy early in life can decrease a person’s risk of Parkinson’s or delay its onset.California’s new earthquake warnings deliver critical seconds of notice The U.S. Geological Survey has released ShakeAlert, its earthquake early warning system. If all goes as planned, a dense network of seismometers on the U.S. West Coast will detect the first waves of an earthquake and relay warnings to first responders, power companies, transit agencies, and in later iterations, the public. But the initial, ambitious promises of detecting distant earthquakes far in advance have been tempered by the complex, unpredictable ways faults fracture. Even the mere seconds of warning the system is now able to produce are considered a major victory.Federal officials pause trial testing stem cells for heart diseaseThis week, federal officials paused a clinical study on the potential of stem cells to repair the heart, citing the news that Harvard University plans to retract 31 papers from cardiac researcher Piero Anversa, many of which were foundational to the trial. Some critics of Anversa’s work say studies like the now-halted trial should never have started, given long-standing questions about how—and whether—the cells Anversa identified might repair heart tissue.This ‘two-faced’ membrane can create electricity—from nothing but salty waterResearchers have developed a “two-faced” membrane with different properties on either side capable of harvesting electric energy via osmosis, in which dissolved particles move spontaneously to balance their concentrations. In this case, the membrane helps efficiently shuttle salt ions from seawater into less salty freshwater, generating an electric current along the way.New generation of ‘flow batteries’ could eventually sustain a grid powered by the sun and windWith the rise of wind and solar power, energy companies are looking for batteries to keep the power flowing when the sun doesn’t shine and the wind fails. Giant devices called flow batteries use tanks of electrolyte capable of storing enough electricity to power thousands of homes for many hours. But most flow batteries rely on vanadium, a somewhat rare and expensive metal, and alternatives are short-lived and toxic. Last week, researchers reported overcoming many of these drawbacks with a potentially cheap, long-lived, and safe flow battery.last_img read more

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Mama Creole star urges aspiring artists and musicians to listen

first_imgShareTweetSharePinOphelia speaks at panel discussion which formed part of activities to celebrate her 40th anniversary in musicDominica’s Lady of song, Ophelia Marie has been giving advice to young aspiring artists and musicians in Dominica, ahead of a special event this evening, which is being held to honour her.The affair, which is dubbed “Mama Creole”, is the culmination of a number activities which have been organized to observe the 40th anniversary of Dominica’s Lady of Song.Ophelia spoke at a panel discussion which was held at the University of the West Indies (UWI) Open Campus earlier this week as part of her anniversary celebrations. “Last time we were here [OECS Music Talk], we were talking about young artists and some of the things that we did and they could pay attention to and one of the things “Mama Creole” will do [is] to insist on the value of listening because I think if I can have some kind of success now, is because I listened and Mama Creole always listens,” she said.She continued, “I can tell the young people to get into understanding their craft and build on their craft. Get into understanding music and what it represents…I have a team and Mark (her husband) is a big part of that team, who can understand having a song knowing to register it so that it is protected. That is one of the main streams for a song writer, to get money from your songs. And if you don’t have money, you cannot do recordings; you cannot move from one place to another to be able to share your work.”The Dominica music icon said Dominica needs to find a way to help young song writers, artists and musicians because they cannot be left to fend for themselves, treated badly and disrespected.Ophelia will be the highlight of the “Mama Creole” show as she celebrates 40 years in music. The event is schedule to take place at the strip (Lalay Coco) on Saturday, May 11th from 9pm. and Sunday, May 12th from 6pm.Ophelia said the show is a big concept because it recognizes the contributions made by creole women.Tonight’s show will also feature French singer Stafane Ravor, Cool Sessions band from St. Thomas and several local acts.Below is video clip featuring Cool Session’s lead vocalist.Video Playerhttps://dominicanewsonline.com/news/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/WhatsApp-Video-2019-05-10-at-2.00.38-PM.mp400:0000:0000:23Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.last_img read more

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Tropical wave affecting Dominica

first_imgShareTweetSharePinA tropical wave is expected to generate cloudiness with shower activity and possible isolated thunderstorms across most of the island chain during today, according to today’s 6:00 am advisory from the Dominica Meteorological Service.People in areas prone to flooding, landslides and falling rocks are advised to exercise caution mainly during this morning.Additionally, another tropical wave over the Central Atlantic currently has a low chance of development and is projected to affect mainly the southern portion of the island chain by late Sunday into Monday.Gusty winds are expected during the next few days particularly over elevated areas of the island.Moderate seas are expected during the next 24 hours with waves peaking near 7.0 feet. Small craft operators and sea bathers, particularly on the east coast, should exercise caution.last_img read more

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Govt cant do away with tolls pay for good services Nitin Gadkari

first_img Parliament Monsoon Session, nitin gadkari, Nitin Gadkari on toll tax, traffic toll plaza, toll tax India, toll FASTags, Indian express However, the minister maintained that toll cannot be collected if roads are not maintained properly.Amidst parliamentarians expressing concern over the collection of toll, Union minister for Road Transport & Highways Nitin Gadkari said people will have to pay the same if they want good services, and said the government cannot do away with it as it requires funds to build infrastructure. After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Related News Advertising Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence Gadkari said his ministry is ready to support every state to set up driving training centres as there is a requirement of 25 lakh drivers in the country. The training centres could be used to train people from tribal and economically weaker communities to provide them jobs, he said.The minister pointed out that land acquisition is a major problem in road construction projects. He urged state governments to come up with solutions and help find a way out. He said his ministry was not moving forward with the project without 80 per cent completion of land acquisition, and this principle is being followed very strictly.Talking about ongoing projects, Gadkari said that in three years, the Greenfield Expressway from Gurgaon to Mumbai will bring down the travel time between Delhi and Mumbai to 12 hours. It will pass through backward and tribal areas of Rajasthan, Gujarat and Maharashtra, and also save Rs 16,000 crore in land acquisition, he said.Noting that more than 400 projects worth Rs 3.85 lakh crore were closed when he assumed charge of the ministry in 2014, Gadkari said the Modi government saved NPAs worth Rs 3 lakh crore over the past five years by beginning work on these projects. “There were 403 projects pending when Narendra Modi came to power, involving a cost of Rs 3,85,000 crore. It is a great achievement of the Indian government that we saved bankers of Rs 3 lakh crore of NPAs and now 90 per cent of projects are mo”ing fast,” he said. Explained: What the government intends to do to improve road safety? Parliament Highlights: Both Houses adjourned for the day, will commence 11 am tomorrow Best Of Express center_img If you want good service, you have to pay: Nitin Gadkari on toll collection However, the minister maintained that toll cannot be collected if roads are not maintained properly.Gadkari, who was replying to a debate on demands for grants for the Road Transport and Highways Ministry in the Lok Sabha, also urged members from all parties to support the Road Safety Bill as the number of people who have died in road accidents over the past year has crossed 2,00,000. Expressing pain over the deaths caused by road accidents, he said his ministry had identified 786 black spots, adding that poor engineering is one of the main reasons for them.The minister also said that the NDA government built 40,000 km of highway during its previous term. Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Advertising He also quoted former US President John F Kennedy to emphasise on the construction of good quality of highways and roads: “American roads are not good because America is rich, but America is rich because American roads are good.”Gadkari said his ministry is working to make Delhi pollution-free, adding that pollution levels have come down by 32 per cent due to various efforts, including building peripheral roads to prevent trucks bound for other states from entering the national capital. All new vehicles from April 1, 2020 will comply with Euro 6 emission norms, he said.The House later passed the Demand for Grants for the ministry. N K Premchandran of RSP withdrew all the cut motions he had moved. Written by Liz Mathew | New Delhi | Published: July 17, 2019 2:23:44 am Post Comment(s)last_img read more

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A fuel shortage is crippling agriculture in Venezuela

first_img venezuela, venezuela agriculture, venezuela agriculture crisis, venezuela news Hundreds of cars wait in a line outside a gas station that had been closed for six days in Venezuela’s Pueblo Llano municipality. (The New York Times)Written by Anatoly Kurmanaev and Isayen Herrera Explained: Kulbhushan Jadhav case file In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief Post Comment(s) Best Of Express Advertising Top News In Venezuela, where hunger is rampant, a farmer recently had to abandon his entire crop. Guiding a pair of oxen, he drew a wooden plow over his field, turning over thousands of shriveled carrots.The trucks that would pick up his harvest never came, he said.A fuel shortage has been gripping the country since May, bringing the nation’s already struggling agriculture industry to the brink of collapse and threatening more hunger and malnutrition in a nation where nearly half the population is eating fewer than three meals a day. “The collapse is exponential,” said Fedeagro President Aquiles Hopkins. “The only possible explanation is that the government simply doesn’t care.”Maduro has responded to the agricultural crisis by promising $35 million in new farming credits in May — a program Fedeagro says is pitifully small and benefits only producers close to the government.Gasoline shortages in the country with the world’s largest oil reserves are only the latest manifestation of a collapse of services under Maduro, which has left millions without reliable supplies of electricity, water and cooking gas.When a fuel import crunch coincided with refinery outages in mid-May, the country plunged into chaos. At least two people died waiting in the gasoline lines that followed.Fuel supply has improved in most major cities since but remains scant in the western half of Venezuela, which accounts for the majority of food production. In the states of Tachira and Mérida, which grow most of the country’s vegetables, residents are limited to 8 gallons of gasoline a month.On a visit to Pueblo Llano last month, 150 cars waited outside the closed gas station for the sixth straight day. Many of the drivers slept in their cars to prevent robberies, braving the frigid weather at an altitude of 7,500 feet. During the day, they walked backed to their farmsteads, a trip that in some cases took hours.“While I’m sitting here in line, my produce is rotting in the fields,” farmer Richard Rondón said as he gave away summer squash as long as his arm from the back of his pickup truck to people passing by. “I got nothing to harvest with.”The collapse of national food production will be nearly impossible to replace with food from abroad, economists say.Venezuelan imports per capita in April fell to the lowest level since the 1950s, as the country ran out of hard currency amid a worsening economic crisis and the tightening of U.S. sanctions, according to Torino Capital, a brokerage firm. The country’s imports totaled just $303 million in April, down 92% from the same month in 2012.“With this level of imports and given the destruction of Venezuela’s agricultural sector, it will be very difficult to avoid a significant deterioration in the availability of food,” said Francisco Rodríguez, Torino Capital’s chief economist.The fuel crunch came at a time when many Venezuelans were already going hungry. In December, the month before America imposed its toughest sanctions, only 55% of Venezuelans ate three meals a day, according to Delphos, a local pollster.The impact of gas shortages in the fields is already felt in the cities. The price of carrots, potatoes and plantains has more than doubled in Caracas’ main wholesale food market in the past month, overshooting even the country’s runaway inflation rate — estimated at about 26% a month — according to market traders.A 120-pound sack of potatoes now costs five times the Venezuelan monthly minimum wage. Faced with skyrocketing food costs, the majority of Venezuelans have been reducing their consumption of vegetables in favor of less nutritious foods like pasta, rice and processed corn, which many get in the government’s subsidized food boxes.Only a third of Venezuelan households bought vegetables other than cheap local root plants on weekly basis in 2017, according to the latest figures from annual nutritional survey co-written by Fundación Bengoa, a local nonprofit. Consumption of vegetables and other nutrient-rich foods has slid further since, contributing to “the hidden hunger of Venezuelans,” according to Maritza Landaeta, a researcher with the organization.“It can’t be possible that the country is going without food and here we are with 6,000 hectares of vegetables, paralyzed,” said the head of Pueblo Llano’s La Trinidad cooperative, Augusto Alarcón. The area is equivalent to 15,000 acres.Soaring vegetable prices for city dwellers are not benefiting the producers, but only reflect the soaring logistical costs.The expense of transporting potatoes from Pueblo Llano to Caracas has tripled in the past few months, said Oswaldo García, one of the last surviving vegetable wholesalers in the region. While car fuel at the pump in Venezuela is nearly free, shortages force logistics companies to make up the shortfall on the black market, where a gallon of gasoline costs up to $6.50, or nearly three times the average price in the United States.Two years ago, García operated a fleet of 70 trucks which shuttled 120 types of fresh vegetables across the country. Today, he has 15 trucks left.To deal with the gasoline shortages, some food transporters have been switching to trucks powered by diesel, which has been better supplied. Gasoline, however, remains a crucial part of the farming chain of production, from the transportation and feeding of workers, to the operation of pumps and the sourcing machinery parts.The shortage has hamstrung the time-sensitive rice and corn harvest in Portuguesa state. In May, it prevented farmers from planting a new crop before the rainy season.“When it’s time to harvest again in four months, we will see the full cost of this” shortage, said Victor Sánchez, a farmer from the Portuguesa town of Turén.His neighbor, Roberto Latini, came to Turén as a boy with his father from Italy in 1956, attracted like hundreds of his compatriots by the offer of free land in a model farming colony built by Marcos Pérez Jiménez, the country’s military ruler.Last month, Latini left all his fields fallow for the first time. The farmers said they have tried to produce despite scarce inputs, price controls, crime, inflation and collapsing demand.Santiago’s municipality of Pueblo Llano, in the Andes Mountains of western Venezuela, has accounted for about 60% of all the potato and carrot production in Venezuela. But this year’s harvest is only half of 2018’s because of the gasoline shortage and other problems such as lack of seeds and fertilizer, according to the local farmers’ cooperative, La Trinidad.Pueblo Llano’s downfall is repeated across the sector. In Venezuela’s vast plains farther east, sugar cane rots just yards from a refining mill and rice fields are left barren for the first time in 70 years because farmers don’t have fuel to transport their produce to distribution centers or seeds and fertilizers to plant new crops.Venezuela’s main agricultural association, Fedeagro, estimates the area planted with the country’s main crops, corn and rice, will shrink about 50% this year. And the sugar output in the main producing state of Portuguesa is down to 5 million tons this year from 12 million in 2018, according to the local sugar cane growing association. More Explained In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home Karnataka: SC to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook Advertising Advertising “This decision has changed my life — it brings fear, anguish,” said Latini, who relies entirely on farming and only has enough savings to survive until the next planting season. Karnataka: SC to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook By New York Times |Venezuela | Published: July 7, 2019 11:27:18 am NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home “It’s all lost,” the farmer, Joandry Santiago, said, pointing to the spoiled vegetables that cost him months of wasted labor.Venezuela is an oil-rich nation. But years of mismanagement and corruption in the oil industry, worsened by U.S. sanctions, have dried up gasoline pumps at a crucial moment. First, the shortage prevented farmers like Santiago from getting their produce to markets. Now, it is making it hard for them to sow new crops.The New York Times interviewed dozens of Venezuelan farmers. Nearly all have slashed their planting area this year and some are leaving their fields fallow — steps that are likely to deplete what is left of the food supply and lead even more Venezuelans to join the estimated 4 million who have fled the country.The lack of fuel is the last straw after six years of economic crisis under President Nicolás Maduro, whose policies of price controls, expropriations and state-sanctioned embezzlement have wiped out the country’s private sector. His repression of political opponents and Socialist rhetoric have drawn the ire of the Trump administration, which has imposed crippling sanctions on top officials and key economic sectors.last_img read more

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More than half of UK firms fear hit from postBrexit immigration plan

first_imgBy Reuters |London | Published: July 9, 2019 9:23:08 am Related News Advertising British employers are already finding it hard to recruit many categories of skilled workers after unemployment in Britain fell to its lowest rate since the 1970s.The BCC said the survey was conducted between April 29 and May 16. Fifty-three per cent of 380 businesses polled by the British Chambers of Commerce (BCC) and job site Indeed said they would be negatively affected by an expansion of Britain’s existing minimum salary threshold for skilled workers from outside the European Union to include all migrant workers after Brexit.Fifty-seven per cent said they would be hurt by plans for a 12-month work and residency limit on lower-skilled immigrants.“Businesses in many sectors are finding it increasingly difficult to hire workers with the right skills,” Pawel Adrjan, an economist at Indeed, said. More than half of UK firms fear hit from post-Brexit immigration plan: Survey Fifty-seven per cent said they would be hurt by plans for a 12-month work and residency limit on lower-skilled immigrants. (Representational)More than half of British companies with foreign staff fear they would be hurt by the government’s plans for a post-Brexit immigration system, according to a survey published on Tuesday. Post Comment(s) UK economy probably shrank for first time in seven years Advertisingcenter_img “Like in any open economy, migration flows are one way to release that pressure valve but as our survey found, new proposals do not appear to flex and breathe depending on employers’ needs,” Adrjan said.The healthcare and construction sectors in particular needed more flexibility, he said.Tighter migration has been central to the Brexit plans of Prime Minister Theresa May – who is due to stand down this month – since the 2016 EU referendum when worries about immigration were widely seen as a factor behind the vote to leave the bloc.Britain’s interior minister Sajid Javid last month asked an advisory committee to look again at its proposal for a salary threshold for skilled migrant workers of 30,000 pounds ($37,512.00) a year which could exclude paramedics, lab technicians, chefs and junior doctors. Best Of Express Aegean lessons Explained: 1.6 lakh Conservative Party members vote to decide next British PM NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home Karnataka: SC to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief last_img read more

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Bihar floods Six districts under water over a lakh displaced NDRF deployed

first_img Congress members slam govt over handling of the flood situation in Assam and Bihar The floods are a result of additional water discharge in Kosi, Gandak and Bagmati rivers from Nepal owing to heavy rains in the country. Due to increased water pressure on banks of Kosi in Supaul, all 56 gates of Birpur barrage have been raised since Saturday evening. Nearly four lakh cusecs water was discharged from the barrage on Sunday morning, causing floods in Supaul, Kisanpur, Marouna and Nirmali. Meanwhile, Bagmati river, which has been flowing above danger marks, has caused floods in over 200 villages of Sitamarhi and Sheohar in North Bihar.Bihar, Bihar floods, Bihar flood deaths, Bihar news, Champaran flood, Nitish Kumar, Bihar CM, NDRF, SDRF, Flood, Sitamarhi, Muzaffarpur, India news, Indian Express Bihar Chief Minister Nitish Kumar takes an aerial survey of the flood affected districts of Bihar, Sunday. (PTI Photo)Sheohar district has lost connectivity with adjoining districts as roads have submerged underwater at several places including the road between Nanpur block of Sitamarhi and Gayghat block of Muzaffarpur. Besides Bagmati, Kamala Balan and Lakhandei rivers have also swelled.Bihar Chief Minister Nitish Kumar, deputy CM Sushil Kumar Modi and water resources minister Sanjay Jha conducted an aerial survey of the flood-hit districts during the day. Nitish has issued a series of instructions to water resources and disaster management department to intensify relief and rescue operations. Advertising Rapid warming of Arabian sea among causes of 3-fold rise in erratic rain in central India: Weather experts Bihar, Bihar floods, Bihar flood deaths, Bihar news, Champaran flood, Nitish Kumar, Bihar CM, NDRF, SDRF, Flood, Sitamarhi, Muzaffarpur, India news, Indian Express East Champaran: A view of flooded streets following incessant monsoon rainfall, at Patahi Block under East Champaran. (PTI Photo)Incessant rains over the last three days have caused floods in six districts of Bihar displacing over a lakh people. The floods have ravaged Sitamarhi, Sheohar, Muzaffarpur, East Champaran, Madhubani, Araria, Darbhanga, Supaul and Kishanganj districts in the state. While three people have reportedly drowned in different locations, there is no official confirmation of any death. Meanwhile, the National Disaster Response Force (NDRF) has been deployed to conduct rescue and relief operation.Bihar, Bihar floods, Bihar flood deaths, Bihar news, Champaran flood, Nitish Kumar, Bihar CM, NDRF, SDRF, Flood, Sitamarhi, Muzaffarpur, India news, Indian Express A view of broken culvert broken due to flooded water following incessant monsoon rainfall, at Chiraiya block under East Champaran. (PTI Photo)“We are sending teams of NDRF and SDRF for rescue operations. We have been also running dozens of camps and community kitchens for the flood-affected people,” Disaster management principal secretary Pratyaya Amrit told The Indian Express.Thousands of people are now living in camps and eating at community kitchens being run by the state government. By Express News Service |New Delhi | Published: July 14, 2019 8:11:36 pm Related News Advertising Bihar floods: Death toll reaches 67, water levels recede but more areas affected 4 Comment(s)last_img read more

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Lok Sabha passes bill to strengthen NIA Amit Shah says Modi govt

first_imgAside from this, the amendments will also allow the NIA to probe cybercrimes and cases of human trafficking.मोदी सरकार राष्ट्रीय अन्वेषण अभिकरण (संशोधन) विधेयक 2019 का कभी दुरुपयोग नहीं होने देगी।इस कानून का शुद्ध रूप से उपयोग देश से आतंकवाद को खत्म करने के लिए ही किया जाएगा।और आतंकवाद को खत्म करते वक़्त हम यह भी नहीं देखेंगे कि यह किस धर्म के व्यक्ति ने किया है। pic.twitter.com/upghrckyuj— Amit Shah (@AmitShah) July 15, 2019The NIA was set up in 2009 in the wake of the Mumbai terror attack that had claimed 166 lives. Since 2017, the Union Home Ministry has been pushing for giving more power to the NIA to meet fresh challenges.Defending the bill, Union Home Minister Amit Shah countered opposition claims over “misuse” of the NIA law. He asserted that the Narendra Modi-led government will never misuse it on the basis of religion and said instead it will ensure the menace of terrorism is uprooted irrespective of the religion of the guilty.He also targeted the previous Congress-led UPA government for repealing anti-terror act POTA, saying it was not done because of its alleged misuse but to “save its vote bank”. Shah further said terror attacks witnessed an upsurge after the Prevention of Terrorism Act (POTA) was repealed resulting in the same UPA government being forced to constitute NIA after the Mumbai attacks. By Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Updated: July 15, 2019 8:59:11 pm Bill to give NIA more powers gets Rajya Sabha nod 36 Comment(s) Advertising Related News What’s changing in NIA: Wider jurisdiction, more offences, faster trial  NIA, NIA bill, National Investigation Agency, Amit Shah, NIA in LokSabha, Amit Shah on NIA, National Investigation Agency (Amendment) Bill, Amit Shah in Parliament, Parliament live, Parliament news, Indian Expres news  Parliament should speak in one voice in giving powers to the NIA to send out a message to terrorists and the world, Amit Shah asserted. (File)The Lok Sabha on Monday passed the National Investigation Agency (Amendment) Bill, 2019, seeking to empower the agency to probe terror attacks targeting Indians and Indian interests on foreign soil. Seeking all-party support for the bill’s passage, Shah said a division in the House on the issue of strengthening the agency will send out a wrong message and boost the morale of terrorists. Parliament should speak in one voice in giving powers to the NIA to send out a message to terrorists and the world, he asserted.Explained: What are the changes in NIA (Amendment) Bill 2019Shah’s response came as several opposition leaders criticised the bill and accused the government of using investigating agencies for “political vendetta”. Some MPs claimed that the anti-terror law is misused at times to target members of a particular community. Click here for Parliament highlights“Let me make it clear. The Modi government has no such intention. Its only goal is to finish off terrorism but we will also not look at the religion of the accused while taking action,” Shah said.During the discussion, Parliament also witnessed a spat between Home Minister Amit Shah and AIMIM leader Asaduddin Owaisi, with the BJP chief asserting that he is not frightening anyone but cannot help when someone has fear in their minds.(With PTI inputs) Malegaon blast: Won’t examine witnesses whose names are truncated in chargesheet for a week, says NIA Advertisinglast_img read more

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BlackBerry KEYones Success Hinges on Physical Keyboard Longing

first_imgThe KEYone is the first licensed BlackBerry device, and as such it is a gamble both for BlackBerry Limited and for handset maker TCL.”This matters more to TCL than BlackBerry,” said IDC’s Llamas, “but no matter how the sales are, BlackBerry (the company) will reap the license revenue.”However, it also will allow TCL, which historically has been producing phones for the consumer market, to pivot toward business users, he pointed out.TCL will not bear all of the risk, though.”If this was a traditional licensing agreement, then that would be true,” explained IHS Markit’s Fogg.”While we don’t know the terms of the agreement, beyond the costs there is the brand risk. If this handset does badly, or there are issues, it could damage the brand; so brand risk is there, even if there isn’t an actual monetary risk,” he explained.”The Priv and the DTEK60 didn’t do all that well, and there isn’t any sign to the carrier that this will do much better either,” Fogg added. “Simply getting adequate distribution and persuading carriers to offer the KEYone with a contract plan is going to be the big challenge. Without that distribution, it is going to be just a niche device.” The KEYone likely will have no appeal for iPhone users, or for Android users who want the functionality of a large touchscreen.”Clearly, it is for the loyalists out there,” said Ramon T. Llamas, research manager for wearables and mobile phones at IDC.”We’re not expecting it to light the world on fire, even as some people said this is the device that should have come out years ago. We can’t rewind time,” he told TechNewsWorld, “but we can see that there are those business users who are typing hounds and will want the device for its physical keyboard.”This isn’t the first Android device running BlackBerry software, noted Ian Fogg, senior director for mobile and telecoms at IHS Markit.However, “this is really the first non-sliding classical BlackBerry with a keyboard under the screen,” he told TechNewsWorld.”Price is the biggest issue, as $550 is a lot to swallow,” noted IDC’s Llamas. “Yes, it is cheaper than Samsung Galaxy S8, but arguably that is a different kind of customer. However, BlackBerry used the same blueprint to target business users with a different choice years ago.” Key Strategy Key Thoughts Key Differences The KEYone’s greatest strength may be the inclusion of the physical keyboard, based on early reviews.”The BlackBerry KeyOne feels like it was built by BlackBerry, which means TCL did a good job keeping things familiar,” Todd Haselton wrote in his review for CNBC.”The highlight of the device is its hardware backlit keyboard, which some people apparently still want in a smartphone,” he added.”A BlackBerry without a keyboard is like a ThinkPad without the pointing stick,” wrote Brian Heater for TechCrunch.However, going from a virtual keyboard to a physical keyboard posed a challenge.”It’s actually hard to move back to typing on a QWERTY keyboard,” explained CNBC’s Haselton. “And unlike the BlackBerry Priv, which offered a software keyboard option, you have to stick to the hardware here.”The phone’s $549 price point could make that keyboard an expensive feature, but it “should align well with anyone who misses the feel of a physical keyboard,” noted Jeff Dunn for Business Insider. “What’s more, it’s the only good phone for that group. For everyone else, though, it’s probably overpriced.”center_img Key Market Peter Suciu has been an ECT News Network reporter since 2012. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, mobile phones, displays, streaming media, pay TV and autonomous vehicles. He has written and edited for numerous publications and websites, including Newsweek, Wired and FoxNews.com.Email Peter. The first reviews of the new KEYone BlackBerry handset appeared this week, and the early consensus is that this device will appeal to BlackBerry fans who want its familiar physical QWERTY keyboard coupled with the functionality of Google’s Android operating system.This handset technically is not a true BlackBerry — it is the first device from TCL since it entered a licensing agreement with BlackBerry Limited, formerly Research In Motion, the maker of the original BlackBerry handsets. TCL’s license agreement covers the name and hardware patents, including the QWERTY keyboard. BlackBerry still provides the back-end software, but the KEYone runs the Android OS under its BlackBerry skin.The KEYone has the appearance of a classic BlackBerry. It features a 4.5-inch scratch-resistant display, an 8-MP front camera with flash, a 12-MP autofocus large-pixel rear camera, a fingerprint scanner and BlackBerry security software.It is powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 625 Octa-Core 2.0 GHz CPU with a 64-bit Adreno 506, 650-MHz GPU. It has 3 GB of RAM and 32 GB of flash memory.The KEYone is preloaded with BlackBerry applications, as well as standard Android apps including Google Chrome, Google Maps and Gmail. It can run on LTE and CDMA networks. It supports Bluetooth 4.2, NFC, WiFi and even FM radio.The BlackBerry KEYone became available earlier this year in Canada. It will hit the shelves next month in the United States for US$549 unlocked. It will become available from Sprint this summer. Even though it might excite long-time BlackBerry users who desire the tactile experience of a physical keyboard, it is unlikely that the KEYone will shake up the market.”It’s a niche product,” said Steve Blum, founder and principal analyst at Tellus Venture Associates.”The KEYone has a screen size and physical keyboard that’s optimized for email. It’s not exactly a nostalgia phone, like the Nokia 3310, but it is a retro product,” he told TechNewsWorld.Sending email using a physical keyboard was the entry point into the mobile tech world for many Gen-Xers and baby boomers, and many of them might find comfort in the KEYone, suggested Blum.That could help sustain the product line — but only to a point.”Whether it’ll sell well enough to keep BlackBerry in the smartphone game is a different question,” Blum said. “The answer depends on whether BlackBerry’s shareholders will be satisfied with a niche role in the mobile market.”last_img read more

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Fathers age shown to affect health of offspring

first_imgA significant number of these negative birth outcomes were estimated to be prevented if older fathers had elected to have children before the age of 45 years. The risks associated with advancing paternal age should be included in discussions regarding family planning and reproductive counselling.” Sources:Infants of older fathers are more likely to be less healthy at birth.Association of paternal age with perinatal outcomes between 2007 and 2016 in the United States: population based cohort study. BMJ. 31st October 2018. By Sally Robertson, B.Sc.Nov 2 2018Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)A new study conducted at Stanford University in California has shown that infants of older fathers are less likely to be healthy at birth, compared with infants of younger fathers. Image Credit: Tatiana Shepeleva / ShutterstockThe authors say the risks of poorer health remain low, but that the study suggests men should be included in preconception care and the health implications of rising paternal age should be investigated further.Traditionally, women have been encouraged not to leave having children until their late thirties and forties because of the increased risk to their offspring and themselves. It is widely believed that aging does not carry the same risks for men. However, the current study suggests that paternal age also has an impact.Few studies have assessed the effect paternal age may have and those that have, have mainly looked at the risk of congenital diseases.As reported in the BMJ, the Stanford researchers examined data available for 40,529,905 births that took place between 2007 and 2016 for the influence of paternal age on various health outcomes of babies and mothers.After adjusting for maternal age, maternal smoking status, the number of prenatal visits, race and education, children with fathers aged 45 years or older were born an average of 0.12 weeks earlier than babies with fathers aged 25 to 34 years and were at a 14% greater risk of being born prematurely (at less than 37 weeks.)The children of fathers aged 45 plus were born an average of 20.2g lighter and were at a 14% greater risk of low birth weight (less than 2500g). Their risk of being admitted to neonatal intensive care was also 14% greater and their risk of having seizures was 18% greater.In addition, the infants of fathers aged 55 years or more tended to have lower scores on a test of newborns’ health called the Apgar test.The study also showed that women carrying the baby of fathers aged 55 plus were at a 34% greater risk of developing gestational diabetes.The researchers emphasise that this is an observational study, meaning no firm conclusions about cause and affect can be drawn. However, they suggest that changes in the sperm of older fathers could explain the results.They also stress that the overall risks of the poorer health outcomes is probably still low, but that rising paternal age is associated with a negative health impact on mothers and babies.last_img read more

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Storage failures of eggs and embryos gain a new perspective

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 20 2018On March 3, 2018, a liquid nitrogen storage tank at the University Hospitals Fertility Center in Cleveland failed. Dr. Eli Adashi, a professor of medical science at Brown University’s Warren Alpert Medical School, characterized the event as a “tragic accident” in which 950 patients lost more than 4,000 frozen eggs and embryos.However, one couple’s wrongful death lawsuit following the incident, which seeks to establish that embryos should be treated as “persons” under the law, could have “a chain of profound implications for other families,” Adashi says.In an “Ideas and Opinions” article published on Nov. 20 in Annals of Internal Medicine, Adashi and co-authors I. Glenn Cohen, a professor of law at Harvard University, and Dov Fox, a professor of law policy and bioethics at the University of San Diego, wrote about the potential implications should the Ohio court hearing the case rule in favor of the couple. They argue that a ruling in favor of the plaintiffs could lead to limits on abortion, stem cell research and in vitro fertilization (IVF).”It would be a sad irony if a legal claim aimed at protecting the rights of those who lost their ability to reproduce had the effect of limiting the reproductive rights of countless others,” the authors wrote.The plaintiffs in the case, Wendy and Rick Penniman, are challenging a legal precedent in Ohio establishing that “a fetus that is not yet viable is not a ‘person’ under its wrongful death law,” the authors wrote. The challenge is based on “the grounds that the ‘life of a person begins at the moment of conception,'” the article notes.A ruling that embryos are “persons” could be used as grounds to limit abortion rights, the authors say, as well as to potentially restrict research on embryonic stem cells. There could be implications for the future of IVF as well.”IVF would be significantly compromised,” Adashi said. “If a clinician were to freeze embryos, and some do not survive the process, how would that be dealt with? Would that be manslaughter? One needs to view this suit in that context. The implications are of national interest. They go beyond the pro-life / pro-choice debate and reach into the very conduct of IVF and other fertility promotion techniques.”Legal limitationsRelated StoriesScientists develop universal FACS-based approach to heterogenous cell sorting, propelling organoid researchSchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds researchMost women glad to do genetic testing before IVF, reports surveyThe authors also discuss the limitations of conventional legal strategies tried in similar cases, including breach of contract, medical malpractice, negligent infliction of emotional distress, and loss of property.Many fertility clinics require patients to sign waivers that explicitly excuse liability for storage failures due to negligence, limiting breach of contract suits, the authors wrote. Medical malpractice also doesn’t apply in a case such as this, because the egg-harvesting procedures were performed properly. And in Ohio, negligent infliction of emotional distress requires the plaintiffs to be “bystanders” to a physical threat to another person; in this case, they did not witness the tank failure, the authors wrote.The last strategy, loss of property and medical costs, doesn’t fully capture the painful disruption of “family-building plans,” Adashi said. However, these are the legal grounds the other 70 other patients affected by the accident are pursing in their class-action lawsuit.The legal system hasn’t established appropriate venues for seeking damages for the destruction of eggs or embryos, he added. “At this point, there’s no clarity in the courts as to how to deal with cases like this.”Revising regulationsAccidents happen, but more needs to be done to limit and track them, Adashi said.”It was a wake-up call for a lot of people in the field,” he said. “How do we deal with something like this? How do we prevent something like this? Who should be in charge?”Professional societies in the fertility field are evaluating the root cause of the incident and are working on new recommendations and guidelines, Adashi said, in an effort to avoid similar situations in the future.The authors note that currently there are few federal regulations pertaining to assisted reproduction technologies and there is no system for tracking reproductive errors in the U.S. Because agents from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) already visit IVF labs to screen donated human tissues for communicable diseases, Adashi says the FDA would be the most relevant agency to assume responsibility for the liquid nitrogen freezers involved in assisted reproduction clinics and track accidents involving eggs and embryos. Source:https://news.brown.edu/articles/2018/11/embryoslast_img read more

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